Do You Choose Cremation Over Burial?

A Royal Crematorium In Thailand

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My Personal Decision About Cremation

I have never liked the idea of being buried in the ground after I die. This is a very person decision. It is a decision that must be discussed among family members so there is no misunderstanding. I have discussed my decision to be cremated with my family.


The cost of a modern funeral and burial is very expensive, depending on the type of service and casket that is purchased. I am very frugal, and I could never understand why people pay so much money to have a fancy casket that will disintegrate in the ground after a few years.

How Modern Cremations Are Done


Cremation occurs in a crematorium that may be part of a chapel or a funeral home. There are also independent commercial facilities.


The body is usually placed in a plain wooden box. The temperature of crematory can be between 870-980 degrees C. or 1,600-1,800 degrees F. Modern cremators have adjustable controls that will monitor the furnace during cremation. The experienced operator monitors the furnace so he will know when the cremation is complete. The entire process can be less than one hour.


Cremators are computer controlled to ensure legal and safe use. In the United States federal law does not require any container requirements. The container can be a simple cardboard box that fits inside a wooden shell that is designed to look like a traditional casket. This shell can be reused after the cremation is completed and the cardboard box is removed.


The “ashes” of the deceased can be delivered to the family according to the custom of the country. In the United States the cremains are usually given to the family in a thick watertight polyethylene bag that is labeled with the person's name. Some families purchase a special urn to be kept in the home.

Interesting Ways To Keep The Cremains


Some Memorial Gardens have a special place to house urns.

The cremains may be scattered over the ground, usually a favorite place of the decedent.

Airplanes can fly over a special place and a family member can release the cremains over the property.

Cremains may be scattered at sea.

One service will send a lipstick sized container of the remains into low earth orbit, where they will remain for years before re-entering the atmosphere.


Another company claims to be able to turn part of the cremated remains into synthetic diamonds that can then be made into jewelry. I have seen advertisements for bracelets and necklaces made this way.


With a special permit cremains may be scattered in national parks.


The possibilities are limitless. This all depends on the personal wishes of the deceased.



A Horrible Incident In Georgia

There was a horrible incident in 2002 when 334 corpses were found intact on the grounds of a crematoriums in Georgia. The owner of the establishment just didn't do his job in making sure theses cremations were carried out. He was tried and sentenced to two 12 year prison sentences. He will then be on probation for 75 years after he serves his time in prison.



Ashes To Ashes: Dust To Dust

At all the funeral services I've ever attended, the clergy always says as part of his prayer: “ashes to ashes, dust to dust”. The phase comes from the Book of Common Prayer, not from the Bible. This phrase is usually recited as the clergy casts earth on top of the coffin.

Mahatma Gandhi's Funeral Pyre

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A Stupa To House The Remains Of Budda

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Some Famous Jews Who Chose Cremation

In modern times as well, one can find famous Jews who chose this way:

  • Albert Einstein - thought to be one of the greatest physicists of all times, whose name became a synonym for the word "genius".

  • Sigmund Freud - the father of modern psychoanalysis, which serves as the current basis for all existing theories about understanding the mind.

  • Robert Oppenheimer - the most important nuclear physicist to work on the American Manhattan Project; he was the first to exploit nuclear energy.

  • Arthur Rubenstein - one of the greatest pianists and conductors of the 20th century. The Arthur Rubenstein International Piano Competition was named in his honor.

  • Harpo Marx - one the three famous Marx brothers.

  • Ethel Merman - Born in Queens, New York, in 1908, she was known for her talent in acting, theater, and especially singing.


How Some Other Religions And Cultures View Cremation


Buddhism: Cremation is acceptable but not mandated. Their founder, Shakyamuni Buddha was cremated.


Hinduism: They feel by cremation, this will induce the soul to pass to its next destination.Open air cremations are becoming less frequent in urban areas. There are crematoriums in most major cities, which are in effect indoor electric or gas based furnaces. Most cremations take place in these indoor crematoriums.

By Hindu tradition Mahatma Gandhi's ashes were to be spread on a river. His ashes were poured into urns which were sent across India for memorial services.


Muslim: They have very strict rules for burial of their dead. The body is bathed and enshrouded in white cotton. The head is positioned in the grave so that it is facing Mecca.


Christian countries and cultures: Cremation has historically been discouraged, but it is accepted now in many denominations.

Catholicism: In 1963, the choice of cremation was permitted in many circumstances. The 183 Code of Canon Law states it recommends the custom of burial should be retained, but it does not forbid cremation. Practices that seem to show disrespect for the ashes of the dead by turning them into jewelry would not be allowed.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS): They have discouraged cremation without expressly forbidding it.

Jehovah's Witnesses: They do not condemn cremation, but it is discouraged.

Judaism: Judaism traditionally disapproved of cremation; however as the Jewish cemeteries became overcrowded in the European towns, cremation became an approved means of disposal. Burial is still the preferred option.

Some secular Jews may reject cremation because of the horrific memories of the Holocaust. At many former Nazi death camps, mounds of ashes are still present.

The Orthodox Jews: Their Jewish law forbids the practice of cremation.














My Husband's Memorial

My huband's ashes were scattered over his beloved ranch, but we erected this memorial in his honor.
My huband's ashes were scattered over his beloved ranch, but we erected this memorial in his honor. | Source

My Husband Was Cremated

My husband and I had discussed our wishes to be cremated. After his untimely death, he was cremated. I was given his cremains at the Funeral Home.

One of his closest friends was an airplane pilot. This friend and I flew over my husband's beloved ranch where he had spent many happy days.

As the plane flew over the ranch, I scattered the ashes out of the open window and cried as I watched his ashes float down to the earth.

This was a very moving experience for me, and one I will never forget.

A Personal Story About A Friend's Cremation

I once had a dear friend who died of cancer. Her wish was that another friend, an airplane pilot, would fly over her ranch with her cremains. Her husband would scatter her ashes over the ground as the plane flew over.


I was seated with the other guests watching all this unfold before our eyes. I saw a small ash floating down from the sky. It landed right in my lap.


I carefully wrapped the tiny ash in my handkerchief, and gently carried it home and placed it in my jewelry box. My intention was to save this little ash forever to remember my friend.


I laid awake that night, thinking about my friend's ash. Then I began to fret about it. I began to have second thoughts about keeping it. If she had wanted me to have her ash, she would have let me know.


I crept out of the house and drove some 25 miles to her ranch. I said a little prayer for her, and opened my handkerchief and released the tiny ash.


How Some People View Cremation


Some people find they prefer cremation to traditional burial for many reasons.

Those people view cremation as a way of simplifying their funeral process. These people view a ground burial as an unneeded complication of their funeral process, and thus choose cremation to make their services as simple as possible.

My mother was a strict Baptist, and as such, would never have approved of my being cremated. She believed the soul would not go to Heaven.

I believe cremation instead of a traditional burial also relieves a lot of stress and pressure for the grieving family.

Also, I don't want my family to think they have to visit my graveside out of obligation.

In my opinion, the cost factor makes cremation attractive, too. The traditional burial takes up space. I feel I have occupied this space on earth for many years, and upon my death, I do not want to take up more space. I will leave space on earth for the living.

I believe in recycling every thing possible, and I think cremation is the ultimate way to recycle our bodies.








What Are Your Feelings About Cremation?

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© 2014 Mary Hyatt

More by this Author


85 comments

billybuc profile image

billybuc 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

It's not my favorite topic, but you wrote it so I read it. LOL I choose to be cremated with as little fuss as possible...then I want my ashes spread at Mt. Rainier. :)


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

I know how interested you are in recycling and preserving our earth's resources. I think that is a lovely idea of having your ashes scattered at Mr. Ranier.

Thanks for reading and making the very first comment!


heidithorne profile image

heidithorne 2 years ago from Chicago Area

I am definitely for cremation and creative ways to celebrate those who have passed on. Our environment cannot sustain the funeral rituals of casket burial.

That being said, I am glad that some cultures (primarily Egypt) have advocated elaborate burial schemes so that we can get a glimpse of how these cultures believed and behaved. But now that we have the written word and so many more ways to communicate and commemorate, this should not be necessary in the future.

Voted up, beautiful, interesting and sharing!


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi heidithorne, Thank you for your views on cremation. It is a subject most people would prefer to not think about, but I do think it is am important subject, and one that should be discussed with to our families.

With the world become more and more overly populated, I think cremation is a very good option.

Thanks so much for the votes and the share, I appreciate that, Mary


JayeWisdom profile image

JayeWisdom 2 years ago from Deep South, USA

Great hub, Mary! The information you provided about how world religions and various cultures consider cremation is very interesting.

My own views about cremation mirror yours. I've told my children so that they can grow accustomed to the idea since it will be the first cremation in our immediate family. But they respect my wishes.

After all, once life is gone, the body is an empty shell. Why take up space on a planet (even underground) which is rapidly running out of room? I can imagine a time in the future when population growth and lack of space may require that all those full cemeteries be 'recycled' and the remains they now house be cremated. I'll just take mine (cremation) from the beginning.

Voted Up+++

Jaye


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi JayeWisdom I grew up a Baptist, and my mother would turn over in her grave if she knew I wanted to be cremated! All the Baptist were buried like she was. I feel very strongly about preserving the earth.

You bring up a good point about cemeteries that could be recycled to return those bodies to the earth by cremation.

When you have some time, check out the link I supplied about becoming a tree after death. I want to live on as an oak tree!

Thanks for reading and for the votes, Mary

Thanks for reading and for the votes, Mary


JayeWisdom profile image

JayeWisdom 2 years ago from Deep South, USA

I read that hub when it was first published, Mary, and loved it. I love the idea of a tree!

Jaye


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 2 years ago from southern USA

Dear Mary,

It is such an important decision to make one's own personal choice and letting all of the family know your wishes. A family member's wishes should be honored.

The costs of funerals are outrageous. You have provided much insight into cremation, and the added information about different cultures and religions was so interesting.

Thank you for sharing about your dear friend. That story brought tears. You are such a good friend to really think hard about what your friend would want. It is a beautiful story.

I still like the idea of becoming a tree, maybe an Oak tree.

Voted up +++ and away


Bob Bamberg profile image

Bob Bamberg 2 years ago from Southeastern Massachusetts

Good hub, Mary! You put a lot of work into it and made it very interesting. On this issue, I'm to the right of billybuc. I want as little fuss as possible, only I don't really care what happens to my ashes.

A dead friend or loved one lives on in my heart and thoughts. I get no comfort from visiting graves or having souvenirs, therefor don't partake. Both my wife and I will be cremated. Neither of us has discussed the ashes issue.

She's very religious; I'm not. I'll offer her ashes to her two children, neither of whom is religious. If they decline, I'll keep her ashes stored away but her picture will certainly be prominent in the house. I just think the time to honor friends and loved ones is while they're living. Voted up, useful and interesting.


bravewarrior profile image

bravewarrior 2 years ago from Central Florida

Mary, I want to be cremated also. My parents are against it, but it's my decision and mine alone. I'd like to have my ashes spread in one of my gardens to help give life to something new.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Good Morning, Faith. So nice to see you! Thanks for reading my Hub about cremation. I just could never understand why people spend so much money to a burial. I'd rather give that money to my family rather than spending it on a burial, and I, too, love the idea of living on after I die as an Oak tree.

Thanks for the votes and your response to this very personal subject, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Bob You sound like me....I've told my children I really don't care what they do with my ashes after I'm cremated, but that was before I found out about these urns that have a tree seed in them. The seed will sprout and make a tree! I want to live on as an Oak tree!

I don't want my family to feel obligated to visit my grave, as I do with my parents who are buried.

Thanks for reading and for the nice compliment on my Hub, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, bravewarrior Yes, this is a very personal decision to be cremated, and I'm sure your parents will honor that decision. If my mother were alive, she would not be happy with my own decision, she was a Baptist and believed that by cremation, the soul would be destroyed!

I love your idea of having your ashes spread in your garden. I want to live on as an Oak tree.

My best, Mary


always exploring profile image

always exploring 2 years ago from Southern Illinois

I found this topic very interesting and informative. I don't know why but the thought of cremation is stressful. My sister Virgie was cremated and there was no viewing, there was really no closure for me. I missed seeing her. I have a large family cemetery where dozens are buried. I already have my headstone in place and the funeral paid for, my burial clothing is hanging in plastic. I do believe that cremation is the best way since our planet is running out of space. The famous people you listed who were cremated was surprising. I must say, " To each his own. " I enjoyed reading your take on this subject. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, always exploring You have really thought out how your body will be taken care of after you are gone, and I admire you for that.

My family has a plot in the little graveyard near where I grew up. My mother and father are there. My mother would never have approved of my decision to be cremated; she was a strict Baptist and believed the soul would not go to Heaven if it were cremated.

I just don't care to take up any more space on earth after I'm dead and gone.

Thank you so much for reading and adding your comment, Mary


AliciaC profile image

AliciaC 2 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

You've raised some good points, Mary. My father and mother were buried beside each other because that's what my mother wanted, but a traditional burial is very expensive. It's also a waste of land, unless the burial is emotionally important for someone. Cremation seems like a much better option, but what I'd really like is to become a tree, as you described in an earlier hub!


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi Alicia Yes, my mother and father are buried in a plot along with several other family members. I feel duty bound to visit their graves on special occasion out of a sense of duty and respect, I guess. I don't want my children to feel the same way. They have more important things to do in their lives!

I have instructed my children where to purchase the urn that will turn us into a tree! I'm glad you like that idea. I 'd love to see that idea catch on, thanks for remembering that Hub.

Have a great day, Mary


midget38 profile image

midget38 2 years ago from Singapore

Good points here, Mary. My grandma said that she


tobusiness profile image

tobusiness 2 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

A subject most of us tends to shy away from, but one that needs to be discussed before it's too late. You've handled this delicate matter extremely well. I like the idea of a biodegradable urn that grows into a tree, a wonderful way to be of use even after death.


Suzanne Day profile image

Suzanne Day 2 years ago from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

I agree with you that I don't want to leave a big financial burden for my family when I go and to be honest, I think they'll be the only ones caring at that point anyway! I feel that being able to scatter my ashes someplace meaningful would make a great funeral rite! Voted useful.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, midget38 Oh, I'm so sorry your comment got cut off. I'd like to know what your grandma said. I do hope you will come back and finish your comment.

Thanks for reading, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, tobusiness I'm glad you agree the cremation should be discussed with our families, as it is very important. I'm also glad you like the idea of being a tree after death. My children already know where to order one of these urns!

Thanks for reading and taking the time to comment. Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Suzanne Day. I'm so glad you would prefer having your ashes scattered in a meaningful place.

I also do not want to be a financial burden on my family, that's why I choose to buy an urn that will turn me into a tree!

So nice to see you, thanks for reading and for the vote, Mary


Lady Guinevere profile image

Lady Guinevere 2 years ago from West Virginia

I have been wanting to find the time to read this. Finally I had the time. Well my father wanted to be cremated when he died on May 27, 2014. He did not want people to look over him and talk about him while he laid in that coffin. I want to be cremated because I feel that we truly are made of the dust of the earth and so shall we become that when our soul and energy leave that heavy body. I also do not want to, one day, float around in a flood.....if you get my drift...lol


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 2 years ago from Orlando, FL

I am much too hyper and also extremely claustrophobic to be laid to rest in a box. I'd go stir crazy. Cremation is the way to go, for me.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Lady Guinevere, thanks for taking the time to read my Hub about cremation. I feel just like your father: I think death is a very private matter, and I hate the idea of people looking at my body lying in a coffin!

I share your thoughts on this subject exactly!

I am so sorry you lost your Father, my condolences.....Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Sunshine625 I feel the same way: I don't want to spend eternity in a box, either! Or until I disentergrate alone with the box! I can just see you banging on the box trying to get out!

Only you and I can find humor in the subject of cremation, right?

Good night, Mary


vibesites profile image

vibesites 2 years ago from United States

Cremation is something special. Yes, for me I'd rather be cremated than be buried. Besides, it has less fuss as well as less expenses as well. Some people wear rings and necklaces with the ashes of their loved ones encased in them. Do you know that some manufactures "diamonds" out of those cremains? It's a bit bizarre, but when the "jewels" are finished they look like any other precious stones... only with a more special meaning.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

HI, vibesites I'm glad you share my desire to become cremated. Yes, I've seen the ads for jewelry made from cremains that look just like diamonds. I like that idea, but I still want to become a tree after death.

Thanks so much for reading and commenting, Mary


Au fait profile image

Au fait 2 years ago from North Texas

When I did my research for my article "All About Death," I discovered that embalmed bodies and caskets enclosed in vaults (usually required by law) can last many hundreds of years.

Given the cost of a casket, and the high cost of a burial plot, I think a lot of people may not get this method of burial even if that is their preference. I would never want my surviving family members scraping up money to buy a burial plot for me when they might need that money for other purposes. Cremation isn't cheap either, which I discussed in my article on death. Once I die I am done with this body so I have told my daughter cremation is the more practical thing to do.

Very interesting article. Voted up and interesting. Will share.


rebeccamealey profile image

rebeccamealey 2 years ago from Northeastern Georgia, USA

It was interesting reading the different views and rules on cremation. I think it is a very "green" thing to do.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Good Morning, Au fait. Yes, I think embalmed bodies are a little like plastic in that they survive for many years! I would not want to take up valuable space on earth for even a short time.

I purchased my cremation with a local funeral home 15 years ago, and my children know where to purchase the recyclable urn that will turn me into a tree after death.

I feel the same way you do; once I'm dead, just return me to the earth.

Thanks so much for reading, the votes and the share, Mary

BTW: I'm off to find your article, I'm anxious to read that.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi rebeccamealey. I think cremation is the ultimate way to keep the planet green, too. I have occupied this earth for a long time, so after my death, I'd like to leave the earth for the living.

Thanks so much for reading and commenting, Mary


travmaj profile image

travmaj 2 years ago from australia

Hi Mary, your decision to cremate and subsequently turn into a tree is most civilised and I'd definitely opt for that too. I have to admit though that I do find cemeteries fascinating for their historical value. When I was researching my family tree I found the graves of my great grandparents in England and much information. However, nowadays cremation is the only way to go - (when we have to!)


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi travmaj I'm so glad you like the idea of becoming a tree after death, too. My mother and father are buried in our family plot where I visit from time to time, but I don't want my children to feel like they have to visit my grave (if I had one) out of obligation.

Yes, I do think cremation is the way to go!

Nice to see you today, thanks for reading, Mary


Dolores Monet profile image

Dolores Monet 2 years ago from East Coast, United States

I agree that cremation is the way to go. But I do know some people who seem to hold onto the cremains. Our family needs to take care of the ashes of a dearly loved one and we are having trouble. I am hoping to go to the place where he was very happy, a beautiful place and near to the spot where he died, a place of his last true joy on earth.


Pamela99 profile image

Pamela99 2 years ago from United States

My husband and I decided on creamtion a few years ago. We purchased a plan and it is all paid for, so it will not be so hard for our children. I have been to several funerals in the last few years that are termed "celebrations of life" for peole that have been creamated. I love that as we remember the person and the things we loved about them, and we are not looking at a casket with a made up body that doesn't even look much like the person. This is my personal opinion, and I think this is a good topic as planning ahead is smart.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi Dolores Monet Your idea of where to scatter those ashes of that person is a good one, I think: a place where he was happy in life. We scattered my husband's ashes over his beloved ranch from an airplane piloted by one of his closest friends.

Thanks so much for your thoughts, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi Pamela99 I, too, have already purchased my cremation, so my children won't have to do that. They know of my feelings about cremation, and I've already told them where to buy the urn that will turn me into a tree after death. Did you by any chance read my other Hub about the urn? I included a link to that one. I want to live on as an Oak tree!

My best, Mary


FlourishAnyway profile image

FlourishAnyway 2 years ago from USA

Your description of how your husband and friend's ashes were distributed were especially moving. I definitely want o return to the earth directly, without taking up precious land.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi FlourishAnyway, so nice to see you. I'm glad you want to return to the earth, too. My cremation was purchased years ago, and my children know where to purchase the urn that will turn me into a tree: I love that idea.

Thanks for taking the time to read and comment, Mary


marcoujor profile image

marcoujor 2 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

Good blend of your personal experiences with factual information, Mary.

I agree and also plan to be cremated as well.

Voted UP and UABI. Hugs, Maria


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi there, marcoujor (Maria) It seems more and more people are interested in becoming cremated rather than occupy more needed space on earth!

My wishes are to live on as an Oak tree. If you're interested in that concept, read my Hub about that when you have some time.

Thanks so much for reading, and the votes, Mary


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 2 years ago from England

I think I would go for the cremation under a tree, I love trees, its not something I thought about, who would? but now you mentioned it, your personal stories touched me, and made me realise its not how they are buried but who loves them, saying that it really all depends on the person, nicely done mary.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Nell Rose Few people have ever heard of this concept of becoming a tree. I like it very much. I do not want to take up more space on this earth in death.

Thanks for the nice compliment, Mary


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 2 years ago from Wales

Very interesting indeed Mary; not a subject I have ever looked into but found this hub very enlightening.

Voted up.

Eddy.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Good Morning, Eddy. So nice to see you here today! Thanks for taking the time to read and comment on the subject of cremation, even though you have not ever looked into it. Yes, it is food for thought, isn't it?

Thanks for reading and for the vote, My best, Mary


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 2 years ago from Houston, Texas

Hi Mary,

Both my husband and I wish to be cremated and scattered when we die. I think as time passes more people will seek this option just due to taking up so much space on earth. I would rather be cremated than end up in a bone house like others do in certain countries. It is nice for families when such things are discussed and decided upon ahead of time. Up votes + sharing.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Peggy W I think all families should discuss this subject as you and your husband have done. My family knows my wishes and I'm sure they will follow through.

I agree with you, I don't care to take up any more space on this earth afer I'm gone; I'd rather leave the space to those who are still living.

My cremation is already paid for, and they know where to purchase the urn that will turn my cremains into an Oak Tree!

Thanks for the votes and the share. Goodnight, Mary


ChitrangadaSharan profile image

ChitrangadaSharan 2 years ago from New Delhi, India

A very unique and bold hub, as I have not read something like this before.

I am a Hindu and the established practice is cremation in our religion. Cremation takes place in the open at the assigned places. There are electrical crematoriums in big cities and the job is done in few minutes. And some part of ashes is handed over to the relatives in earthen pots, to be disposed off with due respect. And it goes back to Nature, from where it came.

Very nice and informative hub about other religious practices. Thanks and voted up!


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, ChitrangadaSharan I am happy to have you as a Hindu comment on my Hub. I personally want to return to the earth as your religion believes. I want to come back as an Oak tree! I wrote a Hub explaining that. I do not want to take up space on this earth after death.

Thank you so much for reading, the votes, and your comment. Mary


Pamela99 profile image

Pamela99 2 years ago from United States

My husband and I made the decision to both be cremated a few years ago, bought ploans and they are paid for. We spent $11,000 on his mother's funeral per her wishes, but I knew I did not want that for me.

I have really like the "Celebration of Life" funerals that often follow a cremation. I want that for my family and friends. My children don't have any big decisions to make and I hope they celebrate the good parts of my life. This is certainly a personal decision. Our ashes will be combined and we will be strewn across the beaufitul water of the gulf.

I think this is a very timely hub and well done.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Pamela99 I just don't understand why people continue to pay huge sums of money for funerals. My instructions to my family are to have me cremated, and the ashes placed in a recyclable urn that has a tree sprout in it. Then I can live on as an Oak tree!

That is a lovely idea of combining your ashes to be scattered in the ocean.

Thanks so much for reading and commenting, Mary


Pamela99 profile image

Pamela99 2 years ago from United States

Mary, I love the oak tree idea. It is certainly like living for a very long time!


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Pamela99 I'm glad you agree with me that living on as an Oak tree is a good idea.

I've already told my family where to buy the urn for my cremains!

My best, Mary


Pawpawwrites profile image

Pawpawwrites 2 years ago from Kansas

My wife plans to be cremated, I don't. I may change my mind in a few years, who knows.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Pawpawwrites As I said, cremation is a very person choice for us. You could change your mind later on; maybe not.

Maybe I have given you food for thought! Mary


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 2 years ago from Houston, Texas

Sharing this good hub of yours again Mary by G+, tweeting and again sharing with HP followers.


DeborahNeyens profile image

DeborahNeyens 2 years ago from Iowa

Interesting article, Mary. My husband and I already have decided cremation is the way to go, with our ashes scattered in a meaningful place. Hopefully, it won't happen for many, many years. Several years ago, a good friend lost her significant other in a car accident. He was cremated and a few months later, she had a celebration of life for him at a horse track (he was a sportswriter and loved the horses). One of the races that day was named in his memory, and my friend got to present the trophy to the winning horse and jockey. I always thought that was a wonderful way to remember him.


DealForALiving profile image

DealForALiving 2 years ago from Earth

In my culture everyone is cremated when they pass away, so I've never given thought to being buried once my time is up.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, there, Peggy. It's always nice to see you! Many thanks for the reread and for the shares; I appreciate that so much.

Have a wonderful day, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, DeborahNeyens. What a lovely thing your good friend did. My Doc was a horse lover, and as I said in the Hub, we had a plaque erected that stated that love.

I like the idea of becoming a tree after death in a recyclable urn.

Thanks for reading and adding to the discussion on cremation. Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, DealForALiving, I think more and more people in our country will opt for cremation as we use up more and more of our earth. I don't want to take up any more space after death that could be used for growing food, etc.

Just curious; where is your country? Thanks for reading and commenting, Mary


caseymel profile image

caseymel 2 years ago from Indiana

I am a bit of a minimalist, so I think cremation would go along with my beliefs.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, caseymel I feel the same way. I like to conserve the earth and do not wish to contribute to its destruction.

Thanks for reading and commenting, Mary


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 2 years ago from The Beautiful South

Well I believe in the "Rapture" mary so I truly hope not to die since the end looks so close; but since we can none know the day nor hour of our Lord's return I know I could die before He comes and I would want cremation. I can't see this earth being taken up with graves and I am fine with from ashes to ashes...from dust to dust. Very interesting hub; sorry I somehow missed it. Up and shared.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi Jackie, I feel the same way. I feel I have taken up space for all these years, now I should leave that space to the living.

You may be interested in my Hub on being a tree after death by way of a recyclable urn!

Thanks so much for reading, the votes and the share, my best, Mary


Elsie Hagley profile image

Elsie Hagley 2 years ago from New Zealand

I'm not a believer in Cremation.

I have told my family in no way to cremate me, I don't think I'm been a bad person and to me that would be like being sent to the devil, I would like my soul to go to heaven and be buried on our farm, but that isn't allowed in NZ.

You have done a great job with this hub and all though it brings tears to my eyes while reading the comments, I feel a bit lost now.

I'm in my seventies now, I will be thinking about this seriously.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Elsie, as I said, this is a very personal decision. Cremation is not for everyone. My parents were Baptists and would "turn over in their graves" if they knew I chose to be cremated!

I am so frugal, and I don't want my children to have to pay those high prices for a regular burial, either.

Thanks for reading, and for the nice compliment on my Hub. Mary


MsDora profile image

MsDora 2 years ago from The Caribbean

I agree with all your reasons for favoring cremation. After Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the thought of bodies flooded out of their graves and floating around convinced me. In addition, the living has better things to do than fussing over graves. Thanks for writing about this topic.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, MsDora Oh, my I remember that well. I don't want my children to think they have to visit my grave and place flowers on it on Mother's Day. Yes, they have better things to do.

Thanks for reading my Hub about cremation and your nice comment. Mary


DDE profile image

DDE 2 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

I prefer cremation. You have introduced another topic I have to think about. Catholics don't cremate and I am married to a Catholic but haven't converted. Interesting thoughts here.


Mel Carriere profile image

Mel Carriere 2 years ago from San Diego California

Considering how many Christian martyrs have been burned at the stake it is interesting that some Christians contend that the soul will not go to heaven after a cremation. I see no problem with, although I am not sure I would choose it. Great hub!


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, DDE. As I said in my Hub, my Mother was a strict Southern Baptist, and she would "turn over in her grave" at the thought of my being cremated! It is a very personal decision for everyone.

Thanks for reading and commenting, Mary


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, Mel Carriere. Cremation is just another way I would choose to preserve our earth's resources. I don't worry about my soul; I think it will go right on up to Heaven!

Thanks for reading and for your comment and compliment, Mary


peachpurple profile image

peachpurple 2 years ago from Home Sweet Home

chinese prefer to cremate to save money and put their ashes in an urn, in the temple. Christians like me, prefer burial where we can stay beside our ancestors.


mary615 profile image

mary615 2 years ago from Florida Author

Hi, peachpurple. Cremation is a very personal choice. My Mother would never have approved; she was a Southern Baptist. I just don't want to take up any more space on this earth after I die.

Thanks so much for reading and for adding your comment, Mary


pstraubie48 profile image

pstraubie48 23 months ago from sunny Florida

As you have said, this is indeed a very personal decision. My choice is cremation too for many reasons.

It is a decision that will often cause division in families when family members disagree even when someone has expressed in writing a desire for such to occur.

Many good thoughts, blessings, and Angels are on the way to you this morning, Mary.


mary615 profile image

mary615 23 months ago from Florida Author

Good Morning, pstraubie48. Some family members will not agree on a person's choice. I think it is so important to have everything in writing while we are alive and well. I have good written instructions for my family. In fact, I have already paid for my cremation!

I return your good thoughts and blessings today, Mary


colorfulone profile image

colorfulone 22 months ago from Minnesota

Mary, I want to share with you what my daughter said when she was little. It was after my, Dad died, and was cremated. One day she said, "When I die, I want to be laminated." She got her words mixed up, but that has made me chuckle over the years every time I am reminded of it.


mary615 profile image

mary615 22 months ago from Florida Author

Hi colorfulone. Your daughter was surely a very bright child!! Thanks for making me chuckle, too!


Kathleen Cochran profile image

Kathleen Cochran 21 months ago from Atlanta, Georgia

I've always thought I'd rather burn than rot, but after hearing about that same guy in Georgia I made my husband promise to watch at least my toe going into the crematorium.

My husband and I both want to be scattered (not smothered or covered - you'd have to live near a Waffle House to appreciate that reference) in the national cemetery in our hometown that dates back to the Civil War. We had one of our first encounters in high school at this cemetery. We had an English assignment to write a story based on someone's tombstone there. Then our sons' Boy Scout Troop placed flags on those graves every holiday. We drive past it every Sunday on the way to and from church.


mary615 profile image

mary615 21 months ago from Florida Author

Hi, Kathleen Cochran Thanks for the chuckle about your toe going into the crematorium! I'm with you; I do not want to rot in the ground; I prefer to come back as an Oak Tree! I like to visit old cemeteries, they are interesting to see, but I do not want to be laid to rest in one.

Thanks for reading and commenting, Mary


Caleb Hart 20 months ago

I've learned a lot about cremation from reading this article. It's interesting that the crematorium delivers the ashes to the family in a bag. I thought they put it in an urn, but I guess the family does that. I'm not sure if I want a traditional burial, or a cremation when I die. http://www.cremationchicago.com/services.html


mary615 profile image

mary615 20 months ago from Florida Author

Caleb Hart, hi. Glad you learned more about cremation from reading my article. My family knows I want to be cremated, and since mine is all paid for, I'm all set!

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