Mysteries of Christianity: Was Jesus a Victim?

A painting entitled, "Ecce Homo" (Behold the Man!) by artist, Antonio Ciseri (1821-1891), showing Pontius Pilate presenting Jesus of Nazareth to onlookers.
A painting entitled, "Ecce Homo" (Behold the Man!) by artist, Antonio Ciseri (1821-1891), showing Pontius Pilate presenting Jesus of Nazareth to onlookers. | Source

"Look what they did to him." That is the type of thing one might say of any victim. Was Jesus a victim?

What does it mean to be a victim? It means that someone else does something bad to someone. The victim does not have control. Does that sound like Jesus?

If someone knows in advance that something bad is going to happen and walks into it knowingly, we might normally call that foolish or brave. What's the difference?

"Foolishness" we might define as including an ignorance of reality—either blindness or an active ignoring of the situation. "Ignorance of reality" might be one way to describe "delusion."

Bravery, on the other hand, is full knowledge of reality and the consequences, but bearing the risks so as to help others. The only difference between such bravery and suicide is in the motivation. The hero would not normally want to take such a risk, but has the reason of helping others. They are unselfish. The suicide victim, on the other hand, wants the risk and its consequences for purely personal (selfish) reasons.

Strength that Transcends the Weakness of Flesh

The Bible's Hidden Wisdom: God's Reason for Noah's Flood (Volume 1)
The Bible's Hidden Wisdom: God's Reason for Noah's Flood (Volume 1)

This book is from years of my own research into a biblical timeline compatible with those of mainstream science. I wasn't surprised that God's holy book would match his own creation (reality), but there were many surprises, including discovering through science the target of Noah's Flood -- a species which went extinct at that time.

 

Is a hero a victim? The two concepts seem completely incompatible. But why? Other people, nature or circumstances threaten great harm upon the hero. And if the hero dies, it was their decision to put themselves into harm's way. Again, this is no suicide victim, because they are unselfish and perhaps because they take full responsibility for their actions.

The suicide victim is all about what "they did to him or her," or what circumstances "did to them." This is zero responsibility. This is an individual full of resentment and creating the greatest separation between self and the rest of the universe.

The hero embraces humanity; the suicide victim shuns humanity.

The hero possesses one other prime quality—that of humility. If someone does something good for someone else, but goes around bragging about it, that immediately tarnishes their badge of heroism. The true hero wants no part of ego.

So, Jesus had awareness of the situation and its risks, he walked into those risks knowing the consequences, but only because his friends needed his help. Jesus took full responsibility for what his enemies did to him. And how else could anyone ever forgive?

When anyone ever truly forgives, one ceases to be a victim. This is because the hero takes full responsibility for what happens to them, even after the fact.

So, was Jesus a victim? Not even for a moment.

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Comments 30 comments

davidkaluge profile image

davidkaluge 5 years ago

The only trust which you have the right to deny is that seeing Jesus as a hero or victim depends on how one considers it. My unpublished book will say more. This is because the Jehovah witness claimed in one of their article that Socrat did not want to escape death when he had the chance because he wanted to prove the concept of soul. They forgot that one can rightly say that Jesus choose to be killed just for the glory he enjoys today even the apostles.He even pushed judas to do it. So it depends.


royblizzard profile image

royblizzard 5 years ago from Austin / Leander, Texas

I enjoyed your article. This is what we should be teaching in our schools, and on the TV, etc. One of my favorite shows was Oliver North talking to the Silver and Bronze Star winners a few years ago. Real Heroism.


lone77star profile image

lone77star 5 years ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

DavidKaluge, thanks for stopping by and sharing the ideas.

"One can rightly say?" I don't think so. Perhaps if you leave out big chunks of the story you could conclude that he was in it for the glory.

Jesus had the power of creation. Wow! Think about that. Satan (ego perhaps?) tempted him to use his power to rule the world. Sounds like something ego would clamor for. But Jesus didn't. He resisted that temptation.

Why would Jesus sacrifice himself on the cross? What does it mean to take on our sins? The great sin was ego -- the opposite of the heroic. Only with the sacrifice and humility he showed can we hope to wake up spiritually. The entirety of his ministry was aimed at that sacrifice -- that lesson. And clearly so many still don't get it.

Jesus push Judas? I don't think so. Jesus knew in advance the nature of Judas. He knew what kind man he was; he could see his ego. He knew Judas would betray him. Perhaps that's why he chose Judas to be one of the twelve. Perhaps he needed a betrayer to facilitate the events to come. But push Judas? Judas didn't need pushing. In the Judas Gospel, Jesus tells his confused disciple not to be afraid that he will amount to much (ego), but that Judas will exceed them all. For he will betray the man which Jesus wore. Interesting wording: wearing his Homo sapiens body like a cloak.

DavidKaluge, you really, really, really do not understand what Jesus was doing. You are sorely confused. I don't know much, for myself, but I seem to think that someone who goes to all the trouble to help save us from ego would not betray that purpose by giving in to ego. I know I have much more to learn, but I'm not convinced by your argument.

And again, thanks for sharing. That's the best way for any of us to learn.


lone77star profile image

lone77star 5 years ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

Thanks Roy. Glad you liked it.

I didn't see the Oliver North program. I've lived in the Philippines for the last 4 years, and didn't see much television the few years prior to leaving the States.

I do remember the Profiles in Courage program of the early 1960's, based on President Kennedy's bestseller. Inspiring stuff. Certainly we could all use more of this.


davidkaluge profile image

davidkaluge 5 years ago

My main point is not what you belief because it does not change anything if your belief is right or wrong because we do not know it. You said Jesus knew Judas and allowed him into his circle just for the expected end. Which means he knew Judas and he could had saved Judas yet he did not not save Judas but let him carry out the deeds. That is all assumtion because we only belief and we are never certain. My main concern is that humanity respect any man that died for a worthy cause including Jesus and others.


Rod Marsden profile image

Rod Marsden 5 years ago from Wollongong, NSW, Australia

Well, lone77star Jesus did know what would happen even before he came into the city. He mounted a donkey then rode it past the gates during a Jewish holiday which is definitely against the custom even to this day. His actions were accepted by the crowd because they understood that he was something special. He also went into the temple and upturned the money tables which was a direct challenge to the priesthood. We know of the breaking of bread and the drinking of wine now referred to as the eucharist and enacted every Easter by most Christians and more often than that by Catholics. He even told Judas what was up so he didn't walk into anything blind. I'll vote up.


Betty Johansen profile image

Betty Johansen 5 years ago

Wow, lone77star, a fascinating analysis! I never considered the question you raise: Was Jesus a victim? But I certainly agree with your conclusion. Not a victim. A hero! My hero!!! Thank you for this interesting discussion.


lone77star profile image

lone77star 5 years ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

Thank you, DavidKaluge. Wonderfully put.


lone77star profile image

lone77star 5 years ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

Rod, thanks for the extra information. Clearly, he was on a mission and was unafraid of anything toward that end. That kind of fearlessness is refreshing, and some day I might have it.


lone77star profile image

lone77star 5 years ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

Betty, my pleasure. Thanks for your kind words. My hero, too! And to be like him is my dearest dream. I also dream of everyone else awakening, too. What a beautiful vision that is.


Enlydia Listener profile image

Enlydia Listener 5 years ago from trailer in the country

If you read my hub on Chapter H, I write about Jesus accepting the mission to come to earth...granted it can be considered fiction, but it is my belief that Jesus chose to come, knew the outcome, and looked forward to the Price he had to pay...not out of heroic foolishness, but a Godly love for his people...not victim...but fearless warrior.


lone77star profile image

lone77star 5 years ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

Enlydia, that gives me goosebumps. Very nicely put. And I agree "Godly love for His people," but could it also be seen as a brother's love for his siblings? Genesis 1:26 seems to indicate that we were all originally children of God -- "sons" of the Most High. I have been blessed with what seems to be evidence of this connection -- miracles and spiritual nature.


ruffridyer 5 years ago from Dayton, ohio

I think it is important to note that Jesus did not want to suffer and die. He asked his Father if the cup could be removed but accepted it anyway. The only way to save mankind he knew and accepted it.

Enlydia is correct, Jesus choise to be the Redeemer before the earth was formed.


lone77star profile image

lone77star 5 years ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

Thanks, Ruffridyer. Yes, his sacrifice was not a comfortable one, but necessary to show us what we need to do -- not literally. We don't each need to climb up on a cross and die physically. We need to sacrifice our most precious mortal self, ego.


Sarah Shepherd profile image

Sarah Shepherd 5 years ago from San Diego, California

Good hub. I have to admit, I am a bit wary of anything having to do with Jesus and dying for our sins, but that is MY belief and I do not push it upon anyone. Anyways, as a firm believer in God AND in Jesus, I must say what you wrote was very nice. And in reading all the comments it certainly makes me take a step back and "reconsider", if you know what I mean. Thank you for the insight!


lone77star profile image

lone77star 5 years ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

Thank you, Sarah. I find myself taking a step back quite often. By no means do I have all the answers. In fact, far too few. Thanks for sharing the journey with me.


Keith Bartley profile image

Keith Bartley 5 years ago

It was with interest that I read this. The thing I always got from the word was his love for us, and more importantly his obedience to God and doing the Father's will. He is truly my Lord. Yes, out of his love he knowingly knew what he was to endure, but God revealed all the glory of it all to him, which he kept his focus on despite the scourging, beatings, and being crucified.


lone77star profile image

lone77star 5 years ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

Lovely words, Keith. I agree. The focus of his mission was merely that of "love." And what a beautiful thing that is.


Kosmo profile image

Kosmo 5 years ago from California

If Jesus was a victim, he was a victim of his own fame. But even discussing such issues is quibbling over trivialities. Jesus shared his humanistic experience, as did the Buddha, and the rest is merely interpretation and imagination. Later!


lone77star profile image

lone77star 5 years ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

Thanks, Kosmo, for your "hit-and-run" opinion. Not very enlightening.

Yes, dude. Later!


Pollyannalana profile image

Pollyannalana 5 years ago from US

It is like a parent protecting their child with their life. Victim would not even be a word to consider. You are certainly right.


lone77star profile image

lone77star 5 years ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

I agree Polly, "victim" isn't even in the right ballpark.

And God has gone to great lengths to rescue His children. Amen to that!


arksys profile image

arksys 5 years ago from Adelaide, Australia

I would never have thought of Jesus being a victim, only a hero.

but in islam we have a little twist in the story where the cross is involved, Jesus was not on the cross, it was a man who resembled Jesus. I might write a hub on the lines of Jesus and islam to explain it further.


lone77star profile image

lone77star 5 years ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

Thanks, Arksys. Not having been there, I cannot say one way or the other. It seems quite curious that Islam would say one thing and Christianity something else entirely.

I have great respect for Mohammed, peace be upon him. I look forward to gaining greater understanding, wisdom and enlightenment.


Minnetonka Twin profile image

Minnetonka Twin 5 years ago from Minnesota

Thanks for starting this great discussion lone77star. Jesus was no victim but a brave hero for dying so that we could have everlasting life. Because of his humanness, he was at times scared but knew what he wanted to do and go beyond his fear and ego. Great hub and hit many buttons.


lone77star profile image

lone77star 5 years ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

Thanks, Minnetonka Twin. Glad you liked the discussion. He certainly is our "guiding light."


Rina Pinto profile image

Rina Pinto 4 years ago from Dubai - UAE

Jesus the Son of God accepted the Will of His Father God Almighty, knowing all the consequences He would have to bear and chose to be a Victim - The Will of the Father - The Cup of bitterness. The Humble Act of our Savior! The Lamb ready for slaughter by the hands of His people! Quiet & Willingly come to Rescue & Redeem us with His Precious Blood.

Thank you for the write - God Bless


lone77star profile image

lone77star 4 years ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

Beautifully written, Rina. Thanks!

I agree with the spirit of what you've written. Spot on!

By most definitions of "victim," you are exactly right. I could use the definition, "A person who is tricked, swindled, or taken advantage of." That Christ certainly does not fit this definition, I'm sure you'll agree.

But how does society view a victim by their behavior? We see none of this in the definitions.

Normally, I don't think of a victim as someone who fully "accepts" the burden. Only when someone fully accepts, then forgiveness is possible and then they cease to be a victim. I have been blessed with this kind of freedom, and though I suffered at the hands of others, their acts were completely forgotten by my love for them. And I felt the love of the Father for me.

Victims, by my definition, do not "willingly" suffer. "Victim" is typically thought of as the dichotomy of "perpetrator." Christ was part of no dichotomy, but only part of the purest and most perfect love.

Perhaps the key difference I see in Christ's suffering, compared to that of victims or even heroes, is that of a complete lack of will or ego. This was his message for us all -- that we should let ego die without any resistance, for ego is the veil we have pulled over our own eyes. Ego is the darkness; Christ is the light.

May God bless us all.


Rina Pinto profile image

Rina Pinto 4 years ago from Dubai - UAE

How marvelous are the thoughts of our Father God in Heaven to send His only Son Jesus on earth and take our place of sacrifice


lone77star profile image

lone77star 4 years ago from Cebu, Philippines Author

Yes, Rina. A stroke of divine genius.

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