Responsibilities

Arguing with myself

     I have started this ‘essay’ at least five times by now. Every time I get a little into it I get somebody disagreeing. “Well, walking the dog is not really a responsibility,” said my buddy as he walked out of my room. “You’re not the only one that walks your dog . . . and you don’t have to do it.” And that’s true. I used to have to do things. I remember as a kid I had tons of responsibilities. I even had to pray at night before going to bed.

     Yet, here I am about twenty years later from the time I had to pray before bedtime and I realize that responsibilities are in the eye of the beholder. They are as divers as the species of fish in our oceans (with some of which we have not even discovered yet). We all have responsibilities of some sort but I am thinking that we all must have some common responsibilities as a species and as inhabitants of this planet, (I am perhaps thinking of Kant and his categorical imperative). I feel that there must be or should be some universal responsibilities, which all people could follow. Thus, I shall explore the world of ‘responsibilities’ to see if I can find ‘something for everyone’.

     Responsibilities are to begin with of two kinds: practical and moral. I will not focus on the practical responsibilities because not only are they too divers amongst people but they come secondary to the moral responsibilities. It is out of the moral responsibilities that the practical ones arise. The action (practical responsibility) only follows after the questions: “What should I do,” and "Why should I do'it'?" are answered.

     Muie! So here I am after the deadline or maybe not yet but very near. I thought about this essay many times and I started it even more times than thinking about it. It’s tough. There aren’t any moral responsibilities or even any practical ones which are universal. As specie, we are too different between each other. Reproduction is not even a responsibility for all of us (I will not have children – there are too many who need help in this world, adoption is a possibility). I was thinking for a second that to live is a responsibility but then, I remembered that my brother-in-law hung himself. For him although he had three little kids, living was not a responsibility. To be fair, truthful or honest . . . again is not something that all people do. We are extremely fucked-up as a specie! And I am done with this topic! I think I have a split personality. My third self will maybe ‘shoot some lines’ later on this topic but I do not see much to be changed.

     The third self has been here, edited a few things but that is it! This topic is still buried. Done with! There is no one responsibility of any kind which every single person on this planet has!

     Well, the ‘fourth self’ is here now (years later), edited only a few words from before and there are ‘things’ needed to be said. I can not imagine how I wrote the last two paragraphs … how I did not see any flaw in my argument and that I was ‘finished’ with the subject.

     I was talking at one point about ‘practical’ and ‘moral’ responsibilities. I already established that ‘moral’ responsibilities are of greater importance than the ‘practical’ responsibilities because the latter category results out of the first. Thus, I shall not talk about the ‘practical’ responsibilities such as: walking the dog, doing laundry, etc.

     The ‘moral’ responsibilities are the ones I would like to focus on. It is this type of responsibility which ‘creates’ an individual, the ‘character’ of a person. Indeed, I have not yet found (or even given it much thought) a ‘moral’ responsibility which everyone in this world already has. In the above two paragraphs I seem to have thought that just because I cannot see any ‘moral’ responsibility common to all people, all is "in vain". “Done with!” as I wrote 'earlier'.

     That is not a valid argument though. It negates our identity as humans. Humans are innovative, creative … we like to think and invent things we dream about thus, imagining and striving for a ‘better world’. In that spirit should we not also strive for some ‘moral’ responsibilities that would fit everyone in this world?

     The Bible (as much as I dislike Christianity and all other monotheistic religions) gives us a list of ‘moral’ responsibilities such as “Do not kill” and so on. Putting aside all the nasty stories about priests or all the garbage about Muslim fanaticism when it comes to Christianity and Islam as well, both the Bible and the Qu’ran give for the most part an insight into a ‘morally’ responsible life. I recommend both books to be read but read as philosophy books and not as some message given by some omnipotent god who is watching us while 'sitting on a cloud'.

     One can look at Buddhists or the Native Indians as well and how they do not like to kill any living creature just for the sake of killing. I believe that to be also a ‘moral’ responsibility for us all: “To respect all forms of life.” It is the Spirit of Life which exists in all of us. So that ‘spirit’ which makes my kitten run around the house is the same ‘spirit’ that allows my fingers to run across the keyboard right now: it is as I like to call it ‘the Spirit of Life’. We should all respect It.

     I am sure more 'moral' responsibilities can be found which everyone should follow. I wonder if I let this ... I was going to say essay but it is not an essay, whatever this is, sit like this for a few more years if there would be a ‘fifth’ self that would come and argue some more. One thing is for sure though: this never turned out to be an essay of any sort.

(I posted this 'thing' that has been "sitting" around for years because I am interested in what other people have to say on this topic thus, I am awaiting comments please.)

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Comments 30 comments

Petra Vlah profile image

Petra Vlah 6 years ago from Los Angeles

As I was reading your essay a picture started to take shape in my mind; it was the logo of the Olympic Games, the interconnected circles of responsibilities (practical and moral). The three circles on top are, more or less, the practical self driven by life experiences and the need to survive.

The bottom two are the deeper self, the ones forming the base for the other three, and the ones who bare the responsibility of moral decisions

By the time I finished reading, a different but somewhat similar picture took shape; it was the image of concentric circles that form on the surface of a motionless lake when you throw a stone.

I do believe that the fifth self is the one creating the ripple effect and influences the other “selves” through energy of thought and feeling.


christinecook profile image

christinecook 6 years ago

I believe the morals we have from our christian heritage cover everything we need.

I am curious though. Are some morals more harmful on society than others? For instance abortion, what is the real cost of this,not only for the person but for society?

Also with morals being challenged,who is really deciding them now?.With the rise of the New World Order,do you think we will have any say?

I am concerned about the moral standards of our society. It seems to me that for every action there is a re-action.Some good,some bad.

Morals our needed to protect people from people.How strange is that.If left to our own demise,what would happen to us?

Greed takes away morals.Greed causes morals to be pushed aside,re-vamped,done away with, for the almighty dollar.

Too many people suffer today for lack of morals. Do we need new ones? I do not think so.


Mr. Happy profile image

Mr. Happy 6 years ago from Toronto, Canada Author

Mrs. Petra, you took my blog to a "different" level all together. Now we are perhaps talking metaphysics. I literally had to switch "mind-frames" to understand your comment. Once I understood it though, it made complete sense. I do believe there are different "selves" to each person; some people having more "selves" than others. And I am not talking about people with "split personalities", I am talking about regular people. Not many of us pay attention to that I would say. This conversation can get very complicated as most metaphysical topics are. Did you at some point study philosophy by any chance?

Mrs. Christine, you also raise very important questions. Who decides on what morals we should follow? I believe all of us do, hence I wanted to ask other people's opinion to see if there is some common ground to be found. And yes, for every single action there is a reaction, always!

Greed is in my view the biggest and worst problem in today's world. Much would be solved and the world would be a much better place if we can stop or at least minimize the "greed" in people.


Petra Vlah profile image

Petra Vlah 6 years ago from Los Angeles

To answer your question Mr. Happy; I had study some philosophy while in collage (since it was a mandatory course), but I read the Socrates’ dialogues with Plato out of curiosity, just as I have done with St. Augustine metaphysics and Kant ethics or Kierkegaard life choices.

That does not qualify me as half an expert.

My comment to your essay is mostly just reminiscence, from what at the time of my college years was the most popular method of thinking, called “structural analysis”; meaning everything could be visualized and interpreted. That’s about it.


christinecook profile image

christinecook 6 years ago

I disagree with your statement that we all make moral choices. I would say that from what I see, moral choices are more often imposed, with most people scratching there heads.

Greed being minimized or stopped, I do not see that happening. Do you?


Mr. Happy profile image

Mr. Happy 6 years ago from Toronto, Canada Author

Mrs. Christine, I am not a greedy person and I highly doubt you are either. Thus, why would it be impossible to have more 'non-greedy' people around. 'Greed' is just like the idea of 'consumerism' and 'materialism' and these last two I see them going 'extinct' sooner than later. It will not happen over-night but the more people become educated, the higher the chances are that they will see 'greed' as something detrimental to our world's society. Thank you for the comments.


christinecook profile image

christinecook 6 years ago

Mr Happy,

What do you think will replace consumerism and materialism?


Winsome profile image

Winsome 6 years ago from Southern California by way of Texas

Thanks for the insights. It helps me to think of responsibility as "response ability." I talked about this in Be Your Best or Die Laughing Trying---the idea is that we have the ability to respond, we can and should make choices when life confronts us. Your essay on Cuba is your response to what you see as injustice. Who gave you that ability to discern the unfairness? How did you know that the disparity was "wrong?" Even primitive societies know that it is "wrong" to take another's wife, to cut in line etc. C.S. Lewis explores a pre-existent "moral law" in his classic "Case for Christianity." Whatever your religion or lack of it, as philosophy goes, it is the clearest thinking I have seen on the subject. As to what God says about our responsibilities, you might also check out this statement by a minor prophet in the Old Testament: Micah 6:8 He has shown you, O man, what is good;

And what does the LORD require of you

But to do justly,

To love mercy,

And to walk humbly with your God

Great Hubs!


Mr. Happy profile image

Mr. Happy 6 years ago from Toronto, Canada Author

Thank you for the great comments everyone! Much appreciated.


ColdWarBaby 6 years ago

"Act only according to that maxim whereby you can at the same time will that it should become a universal law."

One can "will" something from birth to death with no hope of it necessarily becoming a law of any sort. If wishes were horses, beggars would ride.

However different we all may seem, we are really more alike. We all know the difference between right and wrong. Unfortunately we seem unable to act appropriately upon that knowledge.


Amata76 profile image

Amata76 6 years ago from Central Illinois

Very thought provoking. I agree with the not killing just for the sake of killing. I think that if we must kill, for example an animal for eating, it should all be used. No part of the animal should be tossed away, if it can be used. This is why I hate "trophy hunting". Why would you kill an animal just to hang part of it on your wall? Society as a whole is too wasteful nowadays, it goes along with greed. I agree that with education perhaps we can change the greed and wastefulness of society. I like the ripple effect that was suggested in previous comments. Maybe that's how you could look at moral responsibility. What you do will ripple out and affect others, so you should make sure that what you do is what you consider morally right?? I don't know, but hey! Your hub made us give some thought to this subject and that's a good thing :)


lelanew55 profile image

lelanew55 6 years ago

We are all interconnected. All humans are. Not only to each other but to all of life and to what we consider non living too. We are deeply connected to our environment. to the planet and the universe. Our trouble starts when we think we are separate from all these. IF we are connected there is no problem really and we know what our responsibility is.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa

What a fascinating Hub and the comments are great also!

I think there might be some merit in separating morals and ethics to take the argument further. Not that I want to do that here and now!

I do think we each of us makes choices all the time and these choices are based on our values. We might not be conscious of our values but they are guiding us moment by moment, each day of our lives.

Fellow-Hubber Paraglider has made a splendid case for a rational set of ethics.

I would like just to add that from my perspective (what a silly phrase - who's perspective could I speak from, anyway?) I think the various statements of human rights are a good point to start when looking at responsibilities because for every right there is a corresponding responsibility and in trying to understand that responsibility we might find some answers to your question about universal reponsibilities.

For example, if all people have the right to "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness" what is my responsibillity relative to that right? And of course the answer might, indeed certainly will be, different for different people in different situations.

So moral behaviour cannot in the final analysis be pre-determined or imposed from "above" but needs to be discovered anew by each person every day.

So if you want one universal, general responsibility it is, I think, something along the lines of the old Socratic dictum of "know yourself", with the understanding that to know oneself cannot be done in a vacuum - because, as one of your commenters noted, we are all connected. So to know myself means I have to know those around me, and that is my responsibility if I am to act ethically in the world. I need to know and understand those around me, to share life with them, and then, in the light of that knowledge and experience, make the decisions that I have to make each moment.

I've rambled on a bit here, hope someone can make some sense of what I've written here! (taking advantage of my age again!)

Anyway thanks again for exciting the thought processes!

Love and peace

Tony


Mr. Happy profile image

Mr. Happy 6 years ago from Toronto, Canada Author

Thank you all very much for your contributions in terms of comments to what I think is a considerably important issue: that of our "resposabilities". It is greatly appreciated.


andromida profile image

andromida 6 years ago

Great hub, full of moral values and responsible voice.Many time I also argue with myself the same way you do.thanks.


Gigi2 profile image

Gigi2 6 years ago from UK

Great hub, so much to think about. Each of us answers to ourself ultimately. Ethics are what you practice when no one is watching. Sadly morality and ethical practice seems to me far from the leading force in a lot of human existence.


Ladybird33 profile image

Ladybird33 6 years ago from Georgia USA

I am very pleased I stumpled upon you, enlightening and spiritual. thank you.


CMerritt profile image

CMerritt 6 years ago from Pendleton, Indiana

Mr. Happy, to me, accepting personal responsibility for our actions is the most moral act any of us can do. On a Christian level, being willing to accept personal responsibility for our sins is a must, for lack of that is what seperates us from God....and PART of the Christian responsibility is accepting and striving towards the transformation of the fruit of the Spirit, which is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness and temperance....if we ALL could be responsible for our actions with this in mind....what could be wrong?


Spirit Whisperer profile image

Spirit Whisperer 5 years ago from Isle of Man

It is every man's responsibility to wake up from the dream he is living.


Mr. Happy profile image

Mr. Happy 5 years ago from Toronto, Canada Author

That's a good responsibility to think about. Thanks for adding that to the list Mr. Spirit Whisperer. Cheers!


Spirit Whisperer profile image

Spirit Whisperer 5 years ago from Isle of Man

You are welcome my friend. I like your open and honest approach and the comments clearly show that many more appreciate it too. Thank you.


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

Brilliant and left much food for thought.

Her's to so many more to share on here.

Take care and enjoy your day.

Eddy.


Mr. Happy profile image

Mr. Happy 4 years ago from Toronto, Canada Author

Thank you for stopping by and leaving me a comment Mrs. Eiddwen. All the very best!


phdast7 profile image

phdast7 4 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

White Wolf - Good suggestion on your part; I am in the process of responding to your comments and moving our conversation over here. I will probably have to finish commenting on your comments tomorrow. The pile of essays to be graded beckons.

Quoting you – “Now regarding crime and punishment, I say what I say after having worked for over a decade in the underground economy, after having done law-enforcement work and after having trained in martial arts for many years: force does not work, jails do not work and we are only creating more problems in the way we are looking at this issue. People need healing and not punishment. This is the truth.”

People do need healing and not punishment and our prison system is problematic in that so much focus is on punishment, or even revenge as you mentioned in a previous post. (And we have criminalized many behaviors that should never have been considered crimes….but that is another topic, so I will set that aside for now.)

And I am eager for and supportive of alternative methods which focus on healing rather than punishment. But for me, there is still a rationale, a righteous purpose for prisons.

I believe some form of incarceration for some percentage of our population may be necessary to protect the innocent from the cruel, the callous, the greedy among us. I cannot be everywhere at once, but I want the people in my community protected from murderers, habitual rapists, child molesters.

In the society that I would create there would probably still be prisons (many fewer, and smaller), but their entire purpose would be protection. Not punishment for deeds committed, but protection of the innocent, those at risk.

Quoting you – “Whatever I seem to do, I come back to the issue of morality and personal responsability. Perhaps You can give the following a read when You have some time and we can move the conversation there: “ http://hubpages.com/religion-philosophy/Responsibi

Now, I am going to go read your Hub on Responsibilities and respond to your other post. There are not enough hours in the day sometimes. :) Theresa


Mr. Happy profile image

Mr. Happy 4 years ago from Toronto, Canada Author

Greetings Mrs. Theresa,

thank You for visiting this blog/post. I think it was meant to begin with as a place of discussing morals and it does seem to me that morals or lack-off, is a significant factor behind our actions/inactions as people.

In regard to law, crime and ways of prohibiting crime, I think that there are many things to take into consideration.

There are crimes which as You mentioned in a previous comment, should not even be regarded as crimes. Perhaps possesion of marijuana could be one, for example. Then, there are obviously more serious crimes: murder, kidnappings, armed-robberies, etc. All such crimes in my opinion, are linked to psychological malfunctions of the brain. I am not a psychologist nor a psychiatrist but I have encountered people who have done some of the above crimes and there is certainly a "skip" in their reasoning/thinking process. This in my opinion, is a result of either mental illness or some traumatic experience in the past. There are serious reasons for serious crimes. Jails certainly do not help. Hence there are so many repeat-offenders and such.

This brings me to the point You made earlier about the need for putting criminals in jail would be more for protecting the public than for punishing them.

In that case, I would argue that most criminals should be placed in places of rehabilitation. Still under supervision and not free at large but in a place where psychological and emotional needs could be adressed. Otherwise in my opinion, the revolving door keeps spinning. The cost (in so many ways) to us and our societies is extremely high if the status-quo continues.

That is what brings us to this entry here. For quite a long-time, I have been trying to think of certain morals, or responsabilities, which would be able to unite people; to see ourselves as One, to work together and be compassionate and kind ... it is "The Law of One": We are All One.

All the best and thank You again for the opportunity to have this conversation. Cheers!


phdast7 profile image

phdast7 4 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

Good Afternoon White Wolf -

My frustration with laws and punishment exists because I see their failure in trying to establish a fluid and harmonious society. The same may be said of institutionalized religions, for they tried doing much the same thing: control masses of people. The failure can be seen just by simply looking around.

***Punishment is often ineffective and even worse misdirected; we have criminalized many actions and activities inappropriately. Religion too failed at trying to control masses of people, and itself often became cruel and evil in the process. I am not religious, but I do believe there is great truth and healing in spirituality and faith.

***When I feel the need to associate with or worship with a group of likeminded people, I meet with a group of inter-denominational Christians who come from many diverse backgrounds and who do not believe in the “structure or control” of either the Catholic church or the Protestant denominations.

***We meet in small groups, do not invest in buildings or real estate, sharing, singing, learning, caring for one another, and we find ways to be involved in our local communities – feeding the hungry, job training, family counseling, prison ministry, open-air musical outreach for teenagers, etc.

Of course, punishment bothers me because I see it as revenge.

***When it is revenge, which it often is, I think it is both wrong and as we all know, extremely ineffective. Recidivism rates have proven that for years. With extremely violent offenders, I still believe any government has a responsibility to protect innocent citizens…until we establish and implement ways of healing those violent offenders.

At this point, I would rather focus on solutions as I do not see much point into proving our current system flawed - I think many people realize the need for significant and substantial change within our social structures.

To answer your questions about how a moral system could be implemented, I can pick the both of us as an example. We come from very different backgrounds, from different age groups ... even our sex differs yet, we seem to understand each other and respect each other on moral terms. How is this possible? And how can we extend this sort of relationship and way of thinking on a large scale? I think it is through education mainly; that is what You and I have in common as a base for our morality.

Criminal behaviour can be controlled through supervision and care. With that in mind, instead of armies of police officers roaming the streets, there should be armies of social workers, psychiatrists and such ...

***I am in agreement with you here, I would gladly exchange prisons and police for more and better education and treatment facilities and counselor. I think we differ in being able to envision this sort of change taking place.

I live in a very densely populated country and our crime rates and incarceration rates are already so high. What I cannot imagine, although I would totally welcome it, is the resolve of enough people in the US to commit the time and money that would be necessary to create a system like you describe.

Take a look at this when You have time (might find it interesting): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g3hVnVWZ2cQ

***I was vaguely familiar with Indian practices for restoration, but these two videos explained it well. I bookmarked them to go back and learn more later on.

http://gregas.hubpages.com/hub/59-A-Navajo-Traditi

***I also read this and find myself in agreement with Gregas for the most part. I follow him as well.

…anything is possible, as long as we put our minds together. Or as the saying goes: "Anything is possible, it just costs more." (Cost here can be anything from time to energy, resources, etc.)

***This is my major concern….the cost. Not that the consequences of crime and out current criminal system are not horrendously expensive, in more ways than one. They are.

But I see in America no grass roots or political movement willing to fight for the funding and structures and personnel required for such an approach to work. Eventually it would save money and lives and eliminate much suffering and hardship…but hot to generate interest and financial support eludes me.

I cannot thank You enough for the discussion. Many thanks and all the very best!

***Sorry for the long delay in returning to our conversation. It is a good one.

May Wakan Tanka walk with You. : )

***And always with you as well. :) I know the Great Spirit by a different name, but he walks with me and mine, and I am glad for it. :)

Theresa [I can certainly live with the Mrs., if you don't mind the appellation, White Wolf.] :)


phdast7 profile image

phdast7 4 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

White Wolf –

It does seem to me that morals or lack-off, is a significant factor behind our actions/inactions as people.

[I totally agree, so the goal is how do we as a society insure that morals are being taught, absorbed, inculcated, and so on…?]

In regard to law, crime and ways of prohibiting crime, I think that there are many things to take into consideration. There are crimes which as You mentioned in a previous comment, should not even be regarded as crimes. Perhaps possession of marijuana could be one, for example.

[There are probably a lot of behaviors which we have criminalized unnecessarily.]

Then, there are obviously more serious crimes: murder, kidnappings, armed-robberies, etc. All such crimes in my opinion, are linked to psychological malfunctions of the brain…certainly a "skip" in their reasoning/thinking process. This brings me to the point … that jails would be more for protecting the public than for punishing them.

[I think we agree on this, I guess I just hae less hope than you of ever seeing it implemented in my lifetime. But, I will try to have hope based on your hope and maybe not feel quite so discouraged.]

In that case, I would argue that most criminals should be placed in places of rehabilitation. Still under supervision and not free at large but in a place where psychological and emotional needs could be addressed. Otherwise in my opinion, the revolving door keeps spinning. The cost (in so many ways) to us and our societies is extremely high if the status-quo continues.

[The cost of that status quo is terribly high, even more so in lost lives and broken families and destroyed spirits, than in money.]

That is what brings us to this entry here. For quite a long-time, I have been trying to think of certain morals, or responsibilities, which would be able to unite people; to see ourselves as One, to work together and be compassionate and kind ... it is "The Law of One": We are All One.

[I think our conversation if caught up for the moment. :) Hope you are having a wonderful weekend. It is cold and rainy here, but the cats are helping me grade history exams and I am listening to have good music, so what more could I ask for? :) ] Theresa


Mr. Happy profile image

Mr. Happy 4 years ago from Toronto, Canada Author

"I think we differ in being able to envision this sort of change taking place ... What I cannot imagine, although I would totally welcome it, is the resolve of enough people in the US to commit the time and money that would be necessary to create a system like you describe." - If You cannot even imagine it then, how can it ever take place? It wil not. It cannot. So, please start dreaming! (lol) : )

"***This is my major concern….the cost." - Can You elaborate on this please? As You can see, for me cost can be many things, from money to time, energy, etc.

"But I see in America no grass roots or political movement willing to fight for the funding and structures and personnel required for such an approach to work." - We are the Occupy Movement. We have locations world-wide, in every major city of almost every country: from Melbourne - Australia to Frankfurt - Germany, to Paris - France, to Toronto - Canada, to Denver - United States and many, many other places. We have just began our efforts but if You are looking to work at creating a better, fairer and more just world, join us! We need You.

Thank You for the conversation Mrs. Theresa. Cheers!


phdast7 profile image

phdast7 4 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

Hello White Wolf – My apologies for taking so very long to get back to you. I hope things are well with you.

WW - If You cannot even imagine it then, how can it ever take place? It will not. It cannot. So, please start dreaming! (lol) : )

I loved your response and maybe I do need to dream more. :) Over time certain things seem to be consistent failures and problems, and perhaps as I have gotten older, it has become harder to dream, to hope for real change.

Those feelings and attitudes came quite easily in my teens and twenties, not that I had any idea of how to create change on a system-wide scale. I focused my time and effort on local social problems that I could see and attempt to improve.

For many years I helped cook for about 80 people in a homeless shelter – thirty area churches each took a night or two and a team of four women from each church assumed responsibility to buy, prepare, serve, and clean up after the evening meal.

I had three boys, age 8, 10, 14 and they came with me and participated…and that was important to me. Some of the husbands came each evening and stayed up all night washing, drying, folding clothes for all the shelter’s residents while they slept.

I made sure the shoeless children in our neighborhood had shoes; I worked with a fresh fruits and vegetables co-op that provided for about 12 families in our church – healthier food for less money. Until I started working full-time, I was usually involved in several community or church related programs, but I never thought about how to pressure and change the larger system, the power class.

Maybe that is why I have a hard time envisioning what you describe, although I believe in it. When I mentioned that I don’t see in America the will or determination to pay the “cost” I guess I was assuming (and I could be wrong) that the kind of supportive, rehabilitative institutions you describe (as opposed to prisons) would require substantially more money…and I can’t envision Americans willing to pay for that.

Eventually costs would go down, I know that, I have seen that in other areas. The difficulty usually is persuading people to initially spend a lot more on programs that in five, ten years will make a huge difference in society and also bring costs down.

WW - "We are the Occupy Movement. We have locations world-wide, in every major city of almost every country: from Melbourne - Australia to Frankfurt - Germany, to Paris - France, to Toronto - Canada, to Denver - United States and many, many other places. We have just began our efforts but if You are looking to work at creating a better, fairer and more just world, join us!"

Finally!! You have put a name and face and structure to what you hope to achieve that I can get my mind around. Good! Great! I only know a little about a few Occupy locations in the US. But I have been impressed and hopeful, although not altogether sure what their final goals were. It has also been discouraging to see some mayors and governors pay lip service to the Occupy groups and then ignore them or sidestep them.

I was not aware that there were similar Occupy groups around the world (yes various groups protesting for various things), but I saw them as unlinked in any way. I will have to read more and pay more attention and see in what way I might be able to be helpful to the Occupy Atlanta group. When all is said, I will try to “dream” more and more broadly. Be well. Theresa


Mr. Happy profile image

Mr. Happy 4 years ago from Toronto, Canada Author

Thank You for the conversation Mrs. Theresa. I actually cannot thank You enough. All the best! : )

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