Sentence Sermons (Christian Inspiration) #118 --- Sacrifice

Quotations on Sacrifice

As a man is made to the image and likeness of God, self-sacrifice is an outstanding resemblance.

---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., July 31, 1932.

Sacrifice is the leaven of character.

---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., June 5, 1932.

Nothing but Divine Love’s power can bring self-sacrifice to flower.

---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., April 19, 1936.

Sacrifices are divinely demanded of the spirit, that it may learn to be self-supporting.

---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Aug. 22, 1937.

Sacrifice is a God-given opportunity to rid ourselves of earthly baggage that impedes our way through heaven’s narrow door.

---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., July 11, 1943.

Self-sacrifice is a poem, of which even the unlettered heart is capable.

---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Nov. 26, 1933.

There is no service without sacrifice.

---Elijah Powell Brown, Fulton County News, McConnelsburg, Pa., March 22, 1905.

No sacrifice is bitter when sweetened by love.

---Elijah Powell Brown, Natchitoches Populist, Natchitoches, La., March 18, 1898.

Great sacrifices are never self-conscious.

---Elijah Powell Brown, Fulton County News, McConnelsburg, Pa., May 31, 1905.

Christ appoints to His service those anointed with sacrifice.

---Elijah Powell Brown, Fulton County News, McConnelsburg, Pa., Oct. 3, 1901.

No sacrifice is too extravagant in the service of Christ.

---James DeForest Murch, Christian Standard, Cincinnati, Ohio, May 21, 1938.

The game of life is often won by a sacrifice hit.

---James DeForest Murch, Christian Standard, Cincinnati, Ohio, Sept. 5, 1942.

A religion without sacrifice is a religion that does not grow.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Sept. 15, 1937.

Whatever leads to happiness will also lead through sacrifice.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., April 4, 1938.

Life is to be glorified by sacrifice if it is not to become commonplace.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Nov. 7, 1939.

He has not learned the meaning of life whose has not discovered the joy of sacrifice.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., May 21, 1941.

There is no permanent hope without sacrifice.

---Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Dec. 6, 1941.

Sacrifice and service sanctify.

—Henry F. Cope, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash., Jan. 15, 1911.

Where the life is consumed in love’s sacrifice the halo takes care of itself.

---Henry F. Cope, East Oregonian, Pendleton, Ore., May 31, 1909.

Every sacrifice is both a test of sincerity and an expression of service.

---Henry F. Cope, Evening Star, Washington, D.C., Dec. 24, 1907.

The walls of the house of happiness are built of sacrifice.

---Henry F. Cope, Lincoln County Leader, Toledo, Ore., Aug. 3, 1906.

There are no great successes without great sacrifice.

---Henry F. Cope, Monroe City Democrat, Monroe City, Mo., March 31, 1910.

Self-sacrifice is but wise investment.

---Henry F. Cope, Syracuse Herald, Syracuse, N.Y., May 28, 1905.

The only successful life I know is the self-sacrificing life, devoted to God and service to man.

---S. Parkes Cadman, Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, N.Y., Jan. 20, 1930.

We shall be all the happier if we follow the Master’s example, since happiness is a faithful reaction to our unselfish service for others. It may sound paradoxical; nevertheless, it is true, that cheerful living requires sacrificial living. It scatters to increase and what it gladly gives is returned to the giver a hundred fold. We must be saved from our growing self-centeredness and from the malignancies it breeds.

---S. Parkes Cadman, Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Brooklyn, N.Y., March 11, 1935.

There is no service without sacrifice. Love in its vicarious sense means that you must give up something to others that you wanted for yourself.

‑‑‑Robert E. Goodrich, The Shreveport Times, Shreveport, La., March 24, 1924.

Love is the spice of service and sacrifice, and makes both a pleasure rather than irksome tasks.

‑‑‑B.J.W. Graham, Christian Index, Atlanta, Ga., Feb. 18, 1915.

We cannot divorce sacrifice from religion.

---Thomas L. Graham, New York Times, New York, New York, June 29, 1931.

The large results of sacrificial suffering are determined by the greatness of the personality who makes the sacrifice.

‑‑‑William P. King, The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Ga., May 23, 1926.

Love reaches its climax in sacrifice, but hate burns and blazes into vengeance.

‑‑‑H.W. Knickerbocker, Houston Post‑Dispatch, Houston, Texas, Jan. 21, 1929.

Truth triumphs through sacrifice. Its banner is never defeated.

---J.F. Kingsley, Reading Eagle, Reading, Pa., May 27, 1918.

The surest test of love is sacrifice. In the willingness to sacrifice lies the measure of noblest love.

‑‑‑W.H. Knight, The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Ga., Dec. 9, 1935.

Pure love carries the stamp of sacrifice.

---Ernest C. Wareing, Western Christian Advocate, Cincinnati, Ohio, Nov. 13, 1924.

Love is the heart of Christ's religion. Sacrifice is the warm blood that pulsates through the heart and gives it life and energy and meaning. Sacrifice gives to it a burning glow and heat and color, and transforms any life it touches; it puts power into the springs of Christian activity, cleans up the wheels of life for good works along the deadened centers, awakes the feelings anew for Christ and God. Sacrifice is love, and we all know that love is power.

‑‑‑J.B. Whaling, Dallas Morning News, Dallas, Texas, July 14, 1913.

There is the joy of sacrifice. When we give up something for the sake of Him who gave up so much for us; when we deny ourselves in order that we may help somebody, there comes a big shaft of sunlight into the soul, which is at once life-giving and heart-warming. He knows nothing of joy who has not offered sacrifice. The real deeps of our being seem to be stirred only when we prune some of our branches that more fruit that may be borne. And now think for a moment of the character of this joy. It is not on the surface, but it is way down where the storms cannot destroy it. The little surface pleasure is good enough in its way, but it has no real foundation. It is the joy which has as its associates love and intelligence, and the prophetic eye, and the surrender for righteousness, that can never be taken away, because only the hand of God can reach it, and His hand does not destroy, but fulfill.

---Floyd W. Tomkins, Richmond Times-Dispatch, Richmond, Va., May 9, 1915.

The highest service demands sacrifice, and that life is well spent which is poured out in a great cost. No life so spent is ever lost. It is in hoarding life we lose it. Selfishness defeats its own object. Sacrifice never fails of its goal.

---George Venn Daniels, Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 16, 1912.

Vicarious sacrifice is the reality upon which the whole life of the spirit is built, and as it was true for the Lord of all good life, so it is true for every disciple of the same Lord. Sacrifice is not something which cramps and represses life; it is the one thing which expands and glorifies it.

---Earl L. Douglass, The Daily Times, Beaver, Pa., April 13, 1940.

Self-sacrifice is the law of God’s command, and when He redeems a man He redeems him out of the law of self-preservation and into the law of self-sacrifice. This is the communion of life in which we are enjoined with the fellowship of saints from life. This is the life before us. We should withhold nothing, for He withholds nothing He has promised. Believing is finding, and yielding is having.

---M. Woolsey Stryker, Reading Eagle, Reading Pa., Sept. 23, 1906.

Love is the incentive for sacrifice.

—George F. Richards, Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, Jan. 12, 1931.

Sacrifice begins where convenience leaves off.

—George H. Brimhall, Relief Society Magazine, Salt Lake City, Utah, October 1923.

All greatness begins in vision and ends in sacrifice.

—Peter A. Simpkin, Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah, May 31, 1909.

Any service, to any man, under any circumstances, that does not involve, to some degree, personal sacrifice, is not worth giving.

—Alma O. Taylor, Deseret News, Salt Lake City, Utah, Feb. 25, 1922.

The spirit of sacrifice is always the spirit of salvation. The road to salvation and satisfaction is a road marked with the thin red line of sacrifice.

---J.O.J. Taylor, Waycross Journal-Herald, Waycross, Ga., July 24, 1937.

Any sacrifice that man is required to make is simply a discipline, a preparation, through which he will receive a greater blessing than the one he relinquished. If we make a sacrifice in the proper spirit, we will take up far more than we laid down. That is a law of God. He never demanded a sacrifice of anybody but He had in view the bestowal of a greater blessing.

—Orson F. Whitney, Deseret Evening News, Salt Lake City, Utah, Dec. 4, 1909.

If you do not know it is more blessed to give than to receive, it is because you have never given sacrificially.

‑‑‑Gloria Young, Baptist Standard, Dallas, Texas, Sept. 5, 1940.

The road to success always lies across the hills of sacrifice.

‑‑‑Carson City News, Carson City, Nev., Sept. 20, 1921.

Kindness always has in it something of sacrifice.

-‑‑Galveston Daily News, Galveston, Texas, Nov. 12, 1894.

The chief reward of sacrifice is gratitude. Without it, most sacrifice ceases.

‑‑‑Greeneville Democrat‑Sun, Greeneville, Tenn., Oct. 13, 1922.

The law of Christ is the law of service, and the spirit of Christ is the spirit of sacrifice, and no man can call himself a Christian who is not doing some service and making some sacrifice.

—Thomas Frank Gailor, New York Times, New York, N.Y., June 2, 1913.


Life is not a speculation but a sacrament. Its ideal is love and its purification is found in sacrifice.

—H.W. Knickerbocker, Houston Post Dispatch, Houston, Texas, March 26, 1928.


It is a common law to the experience of life that the reward is always in keeping with the sacrifice made. God will never call you from a thing without offering you something better in its stead.

—E.W. Potter, Houston Daily Post, Houston, Texas, May 24, 1915.


Service and sacrifice should often be interchangeable terms.

—Albert R. Bond, Baptist and Reflector, Nashville, Tenn., April 4, 1918.


The fruits of sacrifice become the roots of love.

—Henry F. Cope, Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Ill., Oct. 22, 1905.


Everything that serves serves at the cost of sacrifice, for sacrifice is the price of service.

—S. Stephen McKenney, Western Christian Advocate, Cincinnati, Ohio, May 9, 1929.


Love leads life through the rugged mountain passes of sacrifice that its feet may be strong to climb the crests of contentment.

—W.A. MacKenzie, The Leesburg Morning Commercial, Leesburg, Fla., Feb. 5, 1927.


In sacrificial service we find general satisfaction. In failing to sacrifice ourselves in the cause of others we lose our own respect and that of others.

—Marshall S. Burns, Crowley Daily Signal, Crowley, La., June 14, 1941.


All joy of earth that is deep and true is based on sacrifice. The best, the truest and the most lasting is the fruitage of sacrifice.

—John Edward Carver, Ogden Standard-Examiner, Ogden, Utah, Dec. 12, 1932.


Sacrificial service is the road to the abundant life.

—James DeForest Murch, Christian Standard, Cincinnati, Ohio, March 7, 1942.


Self-sacrifice never fails. The influence of a good life devoted to unselfish purposes is as indestructible as the divine love that inspires it and the omnipotent power which protects it.

—J.W. Chalker, Panama City Pilot, Panama City, Fla., May 2, 1935.


The greatest fact of our life is that we belong, not to ourselves, but to God. We express this relationship chiefly in the act of sacrifice.

—Damian L. Cummins, The Catholic Tribune, St. Joseph, Mo., Feb. 3, 1940.


Sacrifice must be superseded by intelligent self-giving.

—Charles Francis Potter, New York Times, New York, N.Y., Dec. 12, 1927.


What is more beautiful than an act of self sacrifice? It is the fragrant flower of human conduct. It is that which the animal world does not do, but mankind, becoming more and more like God, lives more because of the good they can do for others.

—A.J. Gearheard, The Shreveport Times, Shreveport, La., Aug. 9, 1925.


It takes sacrifice to polish and round off the corners of our character. Sacrifice builds character, and a sacrificial life is a beautiful and noble character. The apostle Paul declares that we are to present our bodies a living sacrifice unto God, which is our spiritual service.

—Eugene N. Duty, St. Petersburg Times, St. Petersburg, Fla., Nov. 29, 1937.


Love is a divine spark laid upon the altar of sacrifice.

—Mrs. H.W. Savage, The Times Picayune, New Orleans, La., Nov. 26, 1916.


Love is the deepest thing in human life and the highest thing in Christian fellowship. But love is vague and formless until it finds expression; and its most effective expressions are in sacrifice and service. Sacrifice and service, through the eyes of love, enlarge and intensify our vision so that we are able to see things in our fellow men that we had never seen before.

—William E. Gilroy, Alexandria Daily Town Talk, Alexandria, La., March 15, 1929.


The two kinds of sacrifice are spiritual and material, but it is difficult to separate them. The spiritual is on the inside of us, in our thoughts and emotions. The material is the visible or audible expression of our emotions. But they go together. The emotions will not endure without some visible and palpable expression; they will be greatly strengthened by such expression. And the material expression of worship, or sacrifice, is only acceptable to God when it is impelled by our inward emotions.

—P.I. Lipsey, Baptist Record, Jackson, Miss., June 2, 1932.


The Master emphasized unselfish service which often involves sacrifices. Many shy away from the idea of self-denial as something repressive, but many thousands have learned that from self-sacrificing service there is two-fold reward. First, there is the joy they get in witnessing and in participating in the rejoicing of the beneficiaries. But more important is their own spiritual uplift and development, their own elevation of soul which may bring indescribable joy and gladness of heart compared with the passing satisfaction enjoyed from selfishly acquired gains or through self-indulgent and worldly pleasures that are bleak and cold, and often bitter. ...

We must be willing to practice self-discipline and to teach our children that Christian sacrifice for fundamental principles and truths pays off in rich rewards, both to individuals and to society.

—J. Percy Goddard, Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah, May 20, 1950.


To the Christian sacrifice means not a payment, but an offering to God of something that is our own. . . If our sacrifice must consist of something which is our own, then we must endeavor to find out what is our own. Surely the lands that we occupy and claim are not our own where are the deed records and the owners of the city lots of Nineva and Babylon? Where will be our boasted ownership to the houses and lands of this earth when we away? No, these material things are not our is the Lord's and the fullness thereof. The Apostle Paul in his letter to the Roman Corinthians says to them: "I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God that ye present your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable sacrifice." (Romans 12:1.)

We see from this that true sacrifice is a personal matter. ... We must take of our means that we have been devoting to our own pleasure and use them for the welfare of others. We must even go so far as to sacrifice our desire for rest and slumber on the Lord's morning, in order that we may worship and serve God on that day. We must indeed sacrifice our opinions when we find that they conflict with the word of God.

Let us try to realize that real sacrifice means the giving of ourselves to God, submitting our wills to the will of God, conquering our own limitations, remembering that in this way we are offering that which is our very own and not another's.

—D.H. Walsh, Austin Daily Statesman, Austin, Texas, April 10, 1911.


Stamp your work with the blood of self-sacrifice, and it will always please God.

—Ernest C. Wareing, Western Christian Advocate, Cincinnati, Ohio, July 19, 1928.


Self sacrifice is the greatest of all human services. Service for Christ is useless and worship is void if our hearts are not in it. The very first commandment is, "Thou shalt love the Lord." Service without sacrifice is not the greatest that can be rendered to our Lord. He does not want our spare moments and odd pennies, for they are the expression of a thankless and heartless soul. God's love demands our best, and we show our love when we give Him our best. True love always gives the best.

—W.T. Watson, St. Petersburg Times, St. Petersburg, Fla., Nov. 5, 1928.


The sacrifices we are compelled to make, as a result of difficult circumstances, have their values when properly appropriated, but the self-imposed sacrifice is an entirely different sort. It represents a voluntary choice of action, a kind of discipline that results in strength of character and breadth of vision.

—Roy L. Smith, Christian Advocate, Chicago, Ill., Oct. 10, 1946.


Sacrifice is the price that every man must pay for success.

Sacrifice is the only short cut to real achievement.

Sacrifice is the mark of any man's mastery over life.

Sacrifice is the partner of love in the administration of the universe.

Sacrifice is the greatest mystery Evil ever attempts to explain.

Sacrifice is the only hope that righteousness has of ultimate victory.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Jan. 1, 1931.


Prayer makes the way for proper entrance into service, and sacrifice begins the service for God and fellowmen.

—George H. Brimhall, Relief Society Magazine, Salt Lake City, Utah, December 1923.


Love for God can be proven in no way so well as by sacrifice for the cause.

—J.B. Cranfill, Baptist Standard, Waco, Texas, May 6, 1897.


Love gives birth to sacrifice and each day brings fresh tidings from the field of service.

—Eugene N. Duty, St. Petersburg Times, St. Petersburg, Fla., July 13, 1936.


Self-sacrifice is essential to leadership. You will give, give all the time. You will give of yourself physically, for the longest ours, the hardest work.

—C.A. Bach, The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Ga., Dec. 23, 1917.


One cannot be a leader without paying the price; but the sacrifice is justified by the service rendered. To be misunderstood and misjudged, to have friend or foe slight or abuse, to go on in the rough and unappreciated task of heroic leadership, to know that one is above the level of the valley groups and try to uplift them, to be willing to suffer and to labor, to .. pass under the shadows of the Olive Trees, and finally to come to the Soul's Cavalry this is to follow a true and worth moral and religious leadership.

—Albert R. Bond, Baptist Education Bulletin, Birmingham, Ala., November 1920.

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