Sentence Sermons (Christian Inspiration) #35 --- Work

Quotations on Work

Providence has so ordained that man’s daily responsibility to work is the never failing leaven of his life.

---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., July 24, 1942.

Work is a divinely ordained remedy for the distress of human disillusionment.

---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 25, 1942.

They unnecessarily work hardest who forgo readily available divine assistance.

---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 16, 1954.

The blessing of work is appreciable from the fact that we would feel utterly lost if the Lord had not given us something to do.

---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Dec. 4, 1955.

Work is man’s salvation, a blessed release from care and worry, a carte blanche to human accountability through the medium of self-expression.

---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Jan. 13, 1957.

There is no day to be faced that will not be made brighter with the sunshine of God’s grace. Whatever the day’s work, the Lord is ready to take a helpful interest in it.

---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Feb. 16, 1958.

One never should take pride in one’s work without humble appreciation of the Lord’s assistance.

---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 24, 1967.

The worth of one’s lifework is not in one’s own estimate but in divine approval.

---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Sept. 10, 1967.

Divine assistance best enables one to do a good day’s work.

---Edmund J. Kiefer, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 23, 1967.

The windows of heaven are always shut against the man who will not work.

---Elijah Powell Brown, Caledonia Advertiser, Caledonia, N.Y., April 12, 1893.

God approves our toil by setting us new tasks.

---Elijah Powell Brown, The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash., Jan. 13, 1901.

Work is honorable if for the sake of developing man, while work for the sake of keeping down manhood is a slavery. One is an honor--the other a curse.

---Henry Ward Beecher, New York Times, New York, N.Y., Oct. 30, 1860.

There are no loafers in heaven. Ability to serve is the first prerequisite of exaltation.

—George H. Brimhall, Y News, Provo, Utah, May 31, 1923.

Work is the key to eloquence and knowledge as well as to virtue.

---Theophile Meerschaert, The Indian Advocate, Sacred Heart, Okla., October 1896.

The man who despises labor despises God and the universe.

---John Dodwell, The Citizen, Berea, Ky., Oct. 23, 1902.

While our blessings come down from heaven, they have to be worked up on earth.

---John Wesley Holland, Livingston Republican, Geneseo, N.Y., April 17, 1930.

Work is always a moral as well as an economic necessity. There is a vital connection between work and growth in character. The person who is denied the opportunity to earn his own living by physical or mental effort is being deprived of a sacred right.

---Walter D. Cavert, Oswego Palladium-Times, Oswego, N.Y., Sept. 3, 1932.

Work has a moral as well as an economic value; idleness corrodes the character. When one is doing nothing the consciousness of the fact annoys him, and he endeavors to find some excuse; and as there is no reasonable excuse his vision becomes distorted by the effort to find even a plausible explanation of his refusal to render service to society. Carl Hilty, the Swiss author, says that happiness is only possible when one is engaged in some regular work which occupies his time, employs his mind and satisfies his conscience, and no one can doubt the truth of that statement. God never intended man to be a drone, and man cannot expect to enjoy life or the respect of those whose respect is worth having if he is no able to show that his existence adds something to the world’s activities, to the world’s wealth, and the world’s welfare.

---Frank Hilton Greer, Oklahoma Farmer, Guthrie, Okla., Sept. 1, 1910.

Work is not a hardship but a joy. God made us to work, and except as our nature is perverted we find in work our chief happiness. The true enjoyment of rest and recreation comes only when there has been work before it. How can a man rest unless he has worked? How can a man relax unless he has first tightened the nerves of exertion? When we have the properly balanced life, with its alteration of toil and rest, and its due proportion of work and play, there is greater joy in the hours of toil than in the hours of rest. Work is an exercise of the soul as well as of the body. Mental toil is a yoke of exertion and enjoyment. And in every useful task there is a chance for skill, for head work and heart work as well as for hand work.

---William Goodell Frost, The Citizen, Berea, Ky., Sept. 29, 1910.

Don’t be sorry that you have to work. You have the hardship of economy; don’t be sorry that you have to save. We have the hardship of careful care and planning of time, careful guardians of conditions of good health. Don’t be sorry that you have these hardships. The only question is, are you working for a good cause? It is an important thing that you should help for the uplift of [your fellow men]. If you have that in your eye, all these hardships will be as nothing. Be useful, independent, equipped. Dwight L. Moody said, “I am going to find out what God can do with one man who is thoroughly consecrated and thoroughly in earnest.”

---William Goodell Frost, The Citizen, Berea, Ky., Sept. 24, 1914.

God never intended that man should live a life of idleness, but has given to each one his appointed work and capabilities to do it. Many people wish themselves rich, imagining that they would have nothing to do, and possibly this is why so many are kept poor. Man has been more highly favored than all of God’s creatures, giving him brains, implanting in him talents and placing in his way opportunities. Thus equipped He says: “Go work today in my vineyard,” and as we work earnestly and faithfully, striving with the capabilities possessed to do all the good we can, we honor and glorify God on earth. God has no rewards for the wicked and slothful, but cheerfully welcomes the good and faithful servant into the joy of his Lord. We should seek to glorify God by the spirit of perseverance in our work.

---William R. Templeton, Reading Eagle, Reading, Pa., Aug. 6, 1888.

The most miserable is he who has nothing to do. “Idleness is the devil’s own workshop.” All our blessings are conditioned upon labor, and there is no such thing as achievement without labor on the part of somebody. It takes spiritual work to develop spiritual strength. All value is conditioned upon work. The ignorant man is of no value intellectually because his brain has done no work. Work and improve your brain and your value will increase as time goes by. We are all laboring men, and all have our places.

---A.M. Lumpkin, El Paso Daily Herald, El Paso, Texas, Jan. 24, 1898.

Honest toil is holy in the sight of God, and an absolute necessity to the well-being of men. Of all the shining stars ever looked down, none is more to be pitied than he who feels in his heart no desire for work, but longs to spend his life in pampered indolence. Life becomes worth living through labor, toil blesses one’s fellowmen and makes the world a happier place in which to live, and best of all, there is the vision of God to those who toil earnestly at their appointed tasks with trust in Him, the fruits of labor upon the stem of life.

---C.B. Foelsch, The News and Courier, Charleston, S.C., Sept. 2, 1929.

We are all agreed that work is a blessing, as well as a duty. The blessing of work is inherent in the quality of life. It is what we are here for. And its rewards, whatever form they may take, are the witness of achievement, the assurance that we have attained to some of life’s values. So I will go cheerfully to my work, expecting that there I shall find the service for which I was made, and so the way to happiness and enduring rewards.

---Clarence H. Wilson, Southeast Missourian, Cape Girardeau, Mo., Feb. 18, 1929.

Work may be an inherited or an acquired taste. In either case it is heaven sent. Something to occupy the mind and hand is essential to happiness. It may be drudgery at first. But all work well done has a future. Work is doing what you do not enjoy for the sake of a future which you clearly see and desire.

---L.D. Young, Dallas Morning News, Dallas, Texas, May 29, 1922.

There is a dignity of labor arising from the fact that it is of divine appointment. Without it there is little satisfaction in life. The active man is not only the useful man, but if he is working on right lines and by right methods he is the happy man. To recognize the dignity of labor, to seek to find happiness in it, to grasp the truth that all useful labor is divine service—this will do more for humanity than all the laws that can be passed on the subject.

---M.L. Zweizig, Reading Eagle, Reading, Pa., Sept. 2, 1912.

We are all agreed that work is a blessing, as well as a duty. The blessing of work is inherent in the quality of life. It is what we are here for. And its rewards, whatever form they may take, are the witness of achievement, the assurance that we have attained to some of life’s values. So I will go cheerfully to my work, expecting that there I shall find the service for which I was made, and so the way to happiness and enduring rewards.

---Clarence H. Wilson, Southeast Missourian, Cape Girardeau, Mo., Feb. 18, 1929.

Work may be an inherited or an acquired taste. In either case it is heaven sent. Something to occupy the mind and hand is essential to happiness. It may be drudgery at first. But all work well done has a future. Work is doing what you do not enjoy for the sake of a future which you clearly see and desire.

---L.D. Young, Dallas Morning News, Dallas, Texas, May 29, 1922.

There is a dignity of labor arising from the fact that it is of divine appointment. Without it there is little satisfaction in life. The active man is not only the useful man, but if he is working on right lines and by right methods he is the happy man. To recognize the dignity of labor, to seek to find happiness in it, to grasp the truth that all useful labor is divine service—this will do more for humanity than all the laws that can be passed on the subject.

---M.L. Zweizig, Reading Eagle, Reading, Pa., Sept. 2, 1912.

In your daily toil you can be a plodder without being a furious grubber.

---J. Marvin Nichols, Amsterdam Evening Recorder, Amsterdam, N.Y., Sept. 5, 1931.

A man’s work is his immortality in process of construction.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Nov. 7, 1930.

God gives every man the ability to work, but he must find his own employment.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 25, 1932.

Life is work. In the work of a man is found the purity or filthiness of his heart. Good work displays the goodness of the soul.

—George S. Benson, The Bison, Searcy, Ark., Jan. 6, 1942.

Wise work is work with God, along the lines of His laws and truths. Foolish work is that work against the laws of God. Wise work is threefold in the eyes of God--it is useful, it is honest, and it is cheerful.

—Carl C. Gregory, Dallas Morning News, Dallas, Texas, Sept. 5, 1927.

When we do honorable work, we're doing much to help to lead happy and productive lives Excellence and quality are reflections of how we feel about ourselves, our lives, and God. Real craftsmanship reflects real caring, and real caring reflects our attitude about ourselves, about our fellowman and about life. Can you imagine Jesus doing poor work as a carpenter and not caring about what He did through those years of service?

—Spencer W. Kimball, The Daily Universe, Provo, Utah, March 15, 1977.

Work is necessary to the mind in the production of truth as the plowing and planting of grain is to the harvest.

—H.W. Knickerbocker, Houston Post-Dispatch, Houston, 'Texas, Feb. 20, 1928.

Genius is faith hard at work.

—Arthur Growden, The Commercial Dispatch, Columbus, Miss., Dec. 9, 1929.

Work today as though it is your last day, but be sure to make the work last.

—Gabriel Ward Hafford, North-Central Louisiana Register, Alexandria, La., Jan. 28, 1955.

Work is a good thing to keep temptations away. We can outflank sin.

—Borden Parker Bowne, The Personalist, Los Angeles, Calif., October 1920.

Work is the best preventive of moral weeds.

—Henry F. Cope, Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Ill., Aug. 15, 1909.

Don't expect God to give you your daily bread unless you are willing to butter it with hard work.

—Dewey O. Miller, The Wesleyan Youth, Marion, Ind., August 1963.

Being good and idle at the same time is simply impossible.

—Bert Moses, Lake Charles American-Press, Lake Charles, La., March 1, 1922.

Work is the best relish for food and the prospector of sobriety and contentment.

—Charles C. Selecman, Dallas Morning News, Dallas, Texas, Sept. 30, 1929.

Success cannot be obtained without work. Develop yourselves by work and meet life’s obstacles with strong and determined resistance. Be pure, upright, moral and honest, and remember that you must possess integrity to succeed in life. Do not shun toil and seek to live in idleness, for you will find that people are generally suspicious of the idler, while the man who is always employed is free from suspicion.

—Francis M. Lyman, The Journal, Logan, Utah, June 3, 1905.

He who would be happy must go to work and stay at work. Work is the normal condition of man; indolence is abnormality. Laziness is the twin sister of crime. The greatest help to health, the inexorable law of success, the preventive against crime, the shield for temptation, the key to happiness, the secret of contentment, the path to wealth, the demand of God and the boon of man is work.

—Louie D. Newton, The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Ga., July 12, 1937.

Enumerating the blessings of life, one must give large place to the blessing of work. There is no happiness apart from work. God has ordained it so. Here is a principle which cannot be ignored if one is to be happy. "To every man his work." (Mark 13:34.) Satan has no more dangerous weapon in his realm of deception than the idea that a man can get something for nothing--that work can be shirked. Many have accepted the suggestion, and they have seemed a little while to succeed, but pay day always comes, and every such victim of Satan finds himself in grief, his hands filled with ashes. Christ is the Master Workman. He declares: "My Father worketh hitherto, and I work. Work for the night cometh when no man can work. Be thou faithful unto death, and I will give the crown of life." (See John 5:17; John 9:4; Revelation 2:10.)

—Louie D. Newton, The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Ga., Sept. 4, 1940.

What work isn't the Lord's work? Anyone who draws the fine line (false because there isn't one) between sacred and secular, between spiritual and temporal, misses many of the meeting points with Christ. Sweat is as real a token of love as is the sound of a choir. He put His own sandals to the dust, didn't He? Draw Him in the heat of the day. Strangely, I have learned that, contrary to every expectation, the more involved I become the lighter the load. Exhaustion does not come from involvement, but from the ceaseless throb of nervous shirking, the emotional strains of the slacker. Conscience–which is the light of Christ--knows what is good for me: Work. And work with Him is energizing instead of enervating.

—Truman G. Madsen, New England Advocate, Boston, Mass., May 1965.

God never works miracles for those who will not work for themselves.

—Roy L. Smith, Christian Advocate, Chicago, Ill.,Aug. 13, 1942.

It is work–

By which we imitate God.

By which we exhibit our divinity.

By which we find the way to happiness.

By which opportunity is translated into achievement.

By which we keep faith in a healthy condition.

By which courage fortifies itself.

By which visions are made virtues.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., May 25, 1932.

The greatest thing in work is its kinship with divinity.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Oct. 2, 1934.

The Lord will provide, but just remember that Providence works with the man who is himself a provider.

—Frank L. Stanton, The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Ga., June 13, 1917.

Inspiration unrolls the drafting paper, thought creates the design and toil builds the temple.

—W.A. MacKenzie, The Leesburg Morning Commercial, Leesburg, Fla., Feb. 17, 1927.

It is a misfortune to have to lead so starched and monotonous existence as to never break into a sweat. The experience should come as the Maker means it--through common toil, and not by artificial processes. Sweat is more than a method of elimination. It is God's earliest and most honorable way of making character. It is the regime of heaven's most ancient reformatory. When God turned to rebuilding a fallen man, he set him to common toil, and said: "In thy sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread all the days of thy life." (Genesis 3:19.) Sweat is the foe of artificiality and conventionalism. It takes the starch out of life and makes us human and approachable. No one can be stuck up who sweats. Suspect the man whose sign of respectability is soft hands and a quarantine against common toil. Sweat is in some subtle way connected with self-respect. Every man, to be a good man, must not be a stranger to the sanctity of sweat. Aspiration, inspiration, perspiration; but the greatest of these is perspiration; only I prefer to call it SWEAT.

—James I. Vance, Kansas City Post, Kansas City, Mo., Nov. 28, 1920.

Work is the blessed privilege–an opportunity–to use hand, heart and mind in the betterment of humanity. It is an expression of the divine in man.

—Kate Brew Vaughn, Dallas Morning News, Dallas, Texas, Jan. 17, 1920.

What the world needs is plenty of work. Work is above reproach and creates self-respect. It wears out clothes in the right place. Work is civilization and salvation.

—Jack Warwick, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Pittsburgh, Pa., Nov. 18, 1936.

Labor is the dignity of man. It is the task of an appointed earth conqueror. It is partnership with God, who creates the materials and purposes in man, a fellow worker who shares with his Maker dominion over the earth. The that ever got abroad in the world is the notion that labor is evil in itself--a penalty, a debasement, and therefore to be regretted and if possible evaded. Work is the ordinance of God. Christ glorified in its dignity. "My Father works and I work." (John 5:17.) ...

Labor is man's necessity. "Man goeth forth to his work, and to his labor." Why? Because it is a sure thing that man's place here in this world was intended to work in it. It is fixed as unavoidable in the purpose of his existence by two necessities. The first is the very simple and effective law that if he does not work he shall not eat. Nothing but a constant output of labor will keep us going. The other necessity is equally compulsive. Health in both personal and public sense is dependable upon the physical exercise of labor. When a large number of men are withdrawn from work, their physical morale begins to decline. In times of unemployment the health records always report a downward start in the community's physical vigor. Work and mental reliability go hand in hand. Idle brains do not develop. Work is also a moral necessity. When men are not working their hearts and minds are in an unhealthy state--beset of bitter thoughts and evil imaginations. Honest labor and true religion are involved together. In his honest labor a man senses his right relations to the will of his Heavenly Father. By his honorable toil he achieves that self-respect which the poet declares leads life Heavenward. Through labor we render an account of stewardship to Him who endowed us.

—John E. White, Christian Index, Atlanta, Ga., Sept. 26, 1929.

Work sounds a little dull and drab. But victorious work has a glow and a charm about it. Honorable work is one of the basic ingredients of satisfactory living. Victorious work is a tonic and a builder of desirable personality. Hard work always brings results. The difference may not appear at once, but it shows up ultimately. No honest work in Christ is lost. Victorious work requires vision. Hazy, indefinite outlook is not inspiring. A clear, definite, glowing possibility will grip and thrill. Both people and work perish when there is no vision. We must see something tremendously significant before we labor with the energy and spirit sufficient for victory. Victorious work requires a goal. We make no headway toward a worthy achievement unless we set our stakes. We cannot go in all directions and get anywhere. We must be specific in our purpose. Those who aim at everything in general and nothing in particular accomplish little compared with what they are actually capable of. Victorious work must be passionate. There must be the contagion of a holy enthusiasm. Folks who are desperately in earnest cannot be denied. Things will yield unless they yield. Where there is a real will inside God's will, victory comes. If we believe in it and love it, our efforts will compel a verdict. Victorious work must be saturated with assurance.

—W.R. White, The Sunday School Builder, Nashville, Tenn., September 1946.

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