Sentence Sermons (Christian Inspiration) #74 --- Malice

Quotations on Malice

The man or woman who nurses malice in the heart and goes around like an old vulture living in filth, will be safe from hell. The devil keeps a respectable set of boarders compared to such people.

---Frank Hilton Greer, Oklahoma Farmer, Guthrie, Okla., May 8, 1907.

Envy and malice are toothless curs ready to run at the first repulse.

---Frank Hilton Greer, Oklahoma State Capital, Guthrie, Okla., Dec. 6, 1910.

Malice drives love to the wall, guile witnesses to its death, hypocrisies merely counterfeit its noble deeds, envy and evil speaking show that this most noble virtue has been supplanted by foul hatred.

---H.F. Wright, El Paso Herald, El Paso, Texas, Nov. 14, 1910.

The man who harbors spite against another is like a man who would keep a colony of ants in his clothes that they might perchance bite his enemy.

---Wickes Wamboldt, Waycross Journal-Herald, Waycross, Ga., Feb. 14, 1934.

Malice is the will to do injury to others without cause.

---Perry Braxton Fitzwater, The Citizen, Berea, Ky., Feb. 19, 1920.

Malice is a terribly deadly gun—at the breech end.

---Henry F. Cope, Lincoln County Leader, Toledo, Ore., Nov. 24, 1905.

Most men feel like giving good measure when malice is in the market.

---Henry F. Cope, New Ulm Review, New Ulm, Minn., Oct. 11, 1905.

Malice—The fruit of the envy tree.

---Hazen Conklin, The Evening World, New York, N.Y., Oct. 18, 1915.

Feeding malice is fostering murder.

---Elijah Powell Brown, Aberdeen Herald, Aberdeen, Wash., June 9, 1904.

Prayer will not flow where malice is allowed to grow.

---Elijah Powell Brown, Duluth Evening Herald, Duluth, Minn., Sept. 28, 1901.

Love never joins in the chorus when malice sings.

---Elijah Powell Brown, The News-Herald, Hillsboro, Ohio, March 31, 1904.

People who remember malice easily forget mercy.

---Elijah Powell Brown, The Watchman and Southron, Sumter, S.C., Sept. 12, 1906.

Rooting out malice may be repressing murder.

---Elijah Powell Brown, Willmar Tribune, Willmar, Minn., Aug. 28, 1901.

Treat the world with malice, and every man’s hand is raised against you.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 28, 1928.

Unhappiness is the inevitable reward of malice.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., July 17, 1928.

A malicious man is always a stranger to the lasting joys of life.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., April 4, 1930.

A malicious man always has woe as his traveling companion.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., April 4, 1930.

A malicious man suffers from the poison of his own malice.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., April 4, 1930.

A malicious man is any town’s most dangerous citizen.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., April 4, 1930.

A malicious man is almost certain to defeat his own prayers.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., April 4, 1930.

The only thing we get out of malice is unhappiness.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 16, 1930.

By entertaining malice we distill poison into our own lives.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., March 10. 1931.

There is no enemy so malicious as a jealous person.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., July 1, 1931.

You will always find someone ready to work malice if you walk ahead of the crowd.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., July 16, 1931.

There is no happiness that is secure when malice is abroad.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., Oct. 5, 1931.

Malice is the trademark of the small mind.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 18, 1933.

Malice is usually the accompaniment of wounded pride.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 18, 1933.

Malice is the venom that hate secretes.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 18, 1933.

Malice is wickedness that is lacking in courage.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 18, 1933.

Malice is the most cowardly form of enmity.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 18, 1933.

Malice is never more dangerous than when clothed in wit.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 18, 1933.

Malice is always ready to wear the masquerade of friendship.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 18, 1933.

The narrow soul is the noblest work of malice.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., June 2, 1936.

There is no benefit in allowing malice to color all our thinking.

---Roy L. Smith, Buffalo Courier-Express, Buffalo, N.Y., May 21, 1937.

No man can rob you of your peace of mind so long as you refuse hospitality to malice.

---Roy L. Smith, Wood County Democrat, Quitman, Texas, Aug. 12, 1925.

Lots of people think they are suffering in silence when they are just treasuring malice.

---Vancouver Sun, Vancouver, British Columbia, Jan. 3, 1929.

No one ever became a sinner through compulsion.

He sins because he wants to sin.

It is true that he may be and most always is enticed into sin.

He is persuaded and lured into sin, however–never forced into it.

And, alas, having been enticed into sin, he in turn begins to entice others, doing devil's work. It is the nature of sinners to entice others, either through malice, or through heedlessness, into sin.

—Elam Franklin Dempsey, The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Ga., Jan. 8, 1924.

Wrath is the anger with the lid off and in wrath you will make wounds that you can never heal. Malice is wrath cooled down into cold hatred, and that is murder, for he that hateth his brother would murder.

—Gipsy Smith, Dallas Morning News, Dallas, Texas, March 11, 1912.

Only in the element of love can we see the Father, that God who is love. A heart of malice cannot see anything good; it sees only its own imaginary wrongs. Love is the light of life and mirrors the divine.

—William P. King, The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Ga., Feb. 28, 1926.

To hide hatred in the heart with a friendly smile upon the lips or to manifest it in vituperation is sure to hurt its subject more than its object. The hater is hurt worse than the hated. Curses recoil upon the head of the curser. Malice sucks up her own venom and poisons herself. Hidden hatred and spoken slander write their verdict upon the character of the hater and slanderer.

—H.W. Knickerbocker, Houston Post-Dispatch, Houston, Texas, Nov. 28, 1927.

Malice digs deep grooves into the soul.

—Ernest C. Wareing, Western Christian Advocate, Cincinnati, Ohio, Sept. 25, 1924.

Malice is the spur to besmirchment.

—Nathan T. Porter, Juvenile Instructor, Salt Lake City, Utah, September 1921.

There is no hatred so intense as that which springs from and begotten of envy and malice.

—Moses Thatcher, Deseret Evening News, Salt Lake City, Utah, Sept. 6, 1884.

To put hatred into the world is to plan the seeds of revenge, the spirit of which is retaliation and reprisal. Such an attitude can never be expected to produce other than malice.

—L. Rex Fairholm, Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah, July 14, 1951.

The man who harbors malice in his breast has about as comfortable a time as if he were toting around a snake.

—Phil H. Armstrong, Florida Times-Union, Jacksonville, Fla., Feb. 11, 1925.

Malice always misconstrues.

—Henry F. Cope, Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Ill., Aug. 22, 1909.

No one dies of spiritual indigestion from swallowing his spite.

—Henry F. Cope, Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Ill., Oct. 17, 1909.

The reward of malice is a restless spirit that knows no peace.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Dec. 26, 1933.

There is nothing malicious that does not damage all concerned.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Feb. 7, 1934.

Nothing is more terrible than malice that is armed with a few half-truths.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., March 22, 1934.

Truth will always be on a cross as long as malice is on a throne.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., April 23, 1934.

Those who entertain malice will never see any beauty in life.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., Feb. 25, 1935.

Malice can always manufacture suspicion when she cannot find facts.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., June 13, 1936.

Malice can always find a pretense upon which to begin action.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., June 13, 1936.

Malice can always disguise herself in the robes of charity.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., June 13, 1936.

Malice can always make her work appear generous and considerate.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., June 13, 1936.

Malice can always find some ally in greed.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., June 13, 1936.

Malice can always deceive some good people with smooth words.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., June 13, 1936.

Malice can always talk the language of patriotism.

—Roy L. Smith, Tampa Morning Tribune, Tampa, Fla., June 13, 1936.

Malice is the poison of human nature.

Galveston Daily News, Galveston, Texas, Dec. 20, 1891.

"Get rid of all bitterness, rage and anger, brawling and slander, along with every form of malice." (Ephesians 4:31.) Get rid of bitterness. The very word signifies the attitude which cherishes resentful feelings. ... It is a harshness and spitefulness which frets and sours. But Paul amplifies this with the significant word "all bitterness." We must abstain from all of it comprehensively and from every form of it individually. Bitterness begins in the mind. Slay it there. Never let it become an attitude, less an action. ...

Bitterness is deadly to the spirit. After we have conquered more carnal capacities, we can still be incapacitated by bitterness. After some volcanoes are extinct, poisonous gases still hover around cracks and crevices at their mouth. After the grossest vices of the flesh are extinguished, still the noxious fumes of bitterness can poison us forever.

Bitterness erupts into what Paul calls rage and anger. Rage is that explosive burst of fury which strikes like lightning. It is an emotional earthquake. Rage is a damburst of anger that floods all around us. ... Bitterness explodes in rage. Rage when cherished becomes wrath, that smoldering disposition that burns in the incendiary center of life. No one may see it, but it burns.

This attitude then becomes a spoken acclamation: brawling and slander. The phrase signifies an outcry of passion. ...

If you tie together all of these ugly, malignant attitudes you would have malice. Malice is the attitude of active ill will, it is the desire to hurt by retaliation. When Paul wrote Titus a vivid description of the life of the lost he said, "At one time we were foolish, disobedient, deceived and enslaved by all kinds of passions and pleasures. We lived in malice and envy, being hated and hating one another." (Titus 3:3.) ...

Malice is an individual matter in the individual heart. ... If you do not stop it, malice will place a film over your eyes so that you cannot see God, wax in your ears so that you cannot hear God, and encrust your heart with folds of insensibility so that you cannot feel God.

—Joel C. Gregory, Baptist Standard, Dallas, Texas, June 29, 1988.

More by this Author


No comments yet.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working