You Can't Save An Atheist

Maybe there's another way...
Maybe there's another way...

Let's begin this hub with a short little quiz. According to the Bible, which of the following people CANNOT get into Heaven?

(a) Adolph Hitler (genocidal warmonger)
(b) Father John Geoghan (serial child molester)
(c) Andrew Carnegie (American industrialist and billionaire)
(d) Osama bin Laden (Islamic terrorist organizer and financier)

Ponder these choices for a moment, and consider the characteristics of each individual: Adolph Hitler is held by many to be the very personification of evil, and is ultimately responsible for the deaths of tens of millions of people. Catholic priest John Geoghan preyed on numerous children in his care for decades while the church hierarchy moved him from diocese to diocese. Osama bin Laden founded and led al-Qaeda, a world-wide terrorist network responsible for, among other things, the 9/11 attacks in 2001. Without question, each of these individuals was evil.

However, if you selected (c), Andrew Carnegie from the above list as the only person unable to enter Heaven, you chose correctly! Hitler, Geoghan and bin Laden, despite their lives of evil, are guaranteed a place in Heaven if they sincerely sought forgiveness through Jesus before they died. Carnegie, arguably the greatest philanthropist in history, is responsible for generously bestowing thousands of schools, libraries and universities upon his adopted country of the United States. His philosophy was expressed most eloquently in his famous quote, "to die rich is to die disgraced" (which happens to mesh well with Jesus' philosophy regarding wealth). Yet Carnegie committed the one sin that CANNOT be forgiven: he was an atheist, and he blasphemied God.

In three of the accounts of Jesus' life in the New Testament, he personally removes any doubt as to the possibility of redemption for the offense of blasphemy against the "holy ghost":

Matthew 12:30-32 - He that is not with me is against me; and he that gathereth not with me scattereth abroad. Wherefore I say unto you, All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men: but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men. And whosoever speaketh a word against the Son of man, it shall be forgiven him: but whosoever speaketh against the Holy Ghost, it shall not be forgiven him, neither in this world, neither in the world to come.

Mark 3:29 - But he that shall blaspheme against the Holy Ghost hath never forgiveness, but is in danger of eternal damnation.

Luke 12:10 - And whosoever shall speak a word against the Son of man, it shall be forgiven him: but unto him that blasphemeth against the Holy Ghost it shall not be forgiven.

There is no strict definiton of blasphemy in the Bible, but the examples provided throughout seem to concur with my dictionary that to "blaspheme" is to show contempt or disrespect toward God. Given that description, I'll proceed with this completely sincere and indisputably blasphemous statement:

------------------------------

I don't believe that God exists, or ever existed. I believe he's a fantasy, a delusion embraced by billions around the globe who have been brainwashed and misled. The God described in the Bible and Quran is an evil, violent, unjust, incompetent, childish, misogynistic and grotesquely insecure being who is worthy of only contempt and ridicule, not love or worship.

------------------------------

My comments are unambiguous, and the consequences laid out in the New Testament are unequivocal: I have blasphemied the "holy ghost," and I CANNOT be forgiven. Regardless of any other moral aspects of my character, and no matter what I do from this moment forward, I am condemned to an eternity in Hell with no possible hope of redemption. This creates a serious dilemma which I now present to every honest and contemplative Christian in the form of the following question:

Do I deserve it?

If you believe that I do -- if you agree with Jesus that the sin of blasphemy is the only unforgiveable sin, and thus worse than EVERY OTHER possible action a human could commit -- then I submit to you that you are an individual with extremely questionable values. If you sincerely believe that giving offense to God is a greater evil (and more deserving of punishment) than murder, genocide or child abuse (ALL which can be forgiven), then I urge you to re-examine your moral principles. Frankly, if this is the moral philosophy you embrace (which is supposedly so superior to secular morals), you should be ashamed of yourself.

On the other hand, if you don't believe that I deserve such consequences, then you contradict the words of Jesus himself. You either reject that my words are unforgiveable, or you recognize the absurd injustice of punishing such action more severely than great evils. In either case, you are essentially allowing your own moral judgement to override that dictated by Jesus (and thereby demonstrating that yours is vastly superior). And if your personal judgement intercedes in this particular matter of faith, how can you consistently and honestly maintain your agreement with anything else said by, or about, Jesus?

Of course, you could ignore the question altogether, but this is the worst possible response. In the words of the great atheist anthem Free Will, if you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice. In refusing to consider the issue at all, you've chosen to accept it as it currently stands -- that my blasphemy condemns me to an eternity in Hell. With your silence, you are not only suggesting your approval of this punishment, but are admitting that you lack the courage to openly say so.

To be an atheist is to inevitably be a blasphemer and, according to the New Testament, beyond forgiveness. But as a believer, you can honestly and objectively reconsider your beliefs and rediscover your own positive secular morality. You can't "save" an atheist, but you can save yourself.



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Comments 37 comments

Titen-Sxull profile image

Titen-Sxull 4 years ago from back in the lab again

The idea of an unforgivable sin seems a direct contradiction of God's supposedly loving and merciful character regardless of WHAT that sin actually entails doing. But then those sorts of contradictions are everywhere in scripture and all manner of apologetics can be employed to sweep them under the rug and pretend they were never there to begin with.

I've been told my an apologist before that "it's unclear whether a human being even CAN commit the unforgivable sin" and "the only one to ever commit it so far was Lucifer". Well then why in the hell would Jesus even bring it up to his disciples? The mental gymnastics people will go to to avoid admitting the Bible's flaws astounds me.

Excellent hub Paladin.


f_hruz profile image

f_hruz 4 years ago from Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Very good point!

Atheists have no reason for wanting to be saved from any religious BS ...

It's the religionoid god delusional types who can and should be helped to regain a better grasp of reality, objectivity, causality, mental health and intellectual honesty ... if you ask me.


Paladin_ profile image

Paladin_ 4 years ago from Michigan, USA Author

Thanks for the read and the comments, guys.

Naturally, I couldn't personally care less whether I'm condemned to a place I don't even believe exists. But the situation I present is a serious dilemma for anyone who DOES believe and considers himself a moral person, and I think it's something they need to sincerely contemplate.


AKA Winston 4 years ago

Actually, the idea of unforgivable sin goes against the notion of an omnipotent god. If the sin cannot be forgiven, either god cannot do it (not omnipotent) or god simply doesn't want to do it (not so charitable of god, after all).

The one question no theologian has ever successfully answered is why would an omnipotent god be handicapped into requiring a blood sacrifice to atone for sin at all?

It is an odd coincidence that an ancient and ignorant tribe of sheepherders whose mystical beliefs favored killing animals to garner the favor of idols and gods would accidentally stumble upon the one true god - and get this - he just happens to like blood sacrifices! Talk about lucky!

I've heard the justifications, but none are compatable with an omnipotent being.


Skarlet profile image

Skarlet 4 years ago from California

I don't understand. What was wrong with Andrew Carnegie?


hawkdad73 profile image

hawkdad73 4 years ago from Riverside, Iowa

Skarlet-

He was an atheist and/or balsphemed god...he insulted god.


Paladin_ profile image

Paladin_ 4 years ago from Michigan, USA Author

Thank you, everyone, for the comments. And thank you, Winston, for the excellent point regarding omnipotence! I'll chew on that one for a while.

Skarlet, Andrew Carnegie is the anomaly in my quiz. If his philosophy and philanthropy are any indication, he was a very good man -- especially in contrast to the scumbags comprising the rest of my list.

Yet, in the topsy-turvy moral world of the Bible, he is the worst of the bunch, because he dared blasphemy God (as hawkdad pointed out). To the best of my knowledge, none of the others ever did.


Indigo Atheist profile image

Indigo Atheist 3 years ago from Chicago, Illinois

Yo, I didn't know Freewill by Rush was about Atheism?

Also, it's kind of stupid how God sets it up. Only ultimate brown-nosers are saved, people who refuse to kiss his invisible arse are hell-bound. Justice? Are you kidding me?

Sounds more like some evil corporate stuff. You can work here, but only people who praise the corporation get promoted, and the CEO is surrounded only by people who praise him....


Paladin_ profile image

Paladin_ 3 years ago from Michigan, USA Author

Hehe. Indeed. Only sycophants need apply. :-)

Thanks for the comments, Indigo!


writersandwich 3 years ago

This article as a whole was excellent but the intro is just really amazingly written. Great stuff! I love how clearly you contextualize the hypocrisy that is bound up in the absurdity that is Theism


Paladin_ profile image

Paladin_ 3 years ago from Michigan, USA Author

Thank you, writersandwich! I do my best.


M. T. Dremer profile image

M. T. Dremer 3 years ago from United States

Well written! The morality issue is one of most flawed arguments, yet somehow it's also the most common. There are similar questions to the one you posed where there is no right answer and I can only assume that theists refuse to answer it. Either that, or they'll just quote the bible or say something about the importance of faith. Even they realize, on some level, that if they answer it, they will be admitting defeat.


Paladin_ profile image

Paladin_ 3 years ago from Michigan, USA Author

Thanks, M.T.

This question does, indeed, present an awesome moral quandary for any rational and honest believer. My goal is to encourage them to confront such uncomfortable questions and shake them out of their comfort zone. It's the best way to start cracks in the walls of delusion that maintain religious faith.


jonnycomelately profile image

jonnycomelately 2 years ago from Tasmania

Delusion... lovely word.


Paladin_ profile image

Paladin_ 2 years ago from Michigan, USA Author

Indeed, it's actually a bit harsh. But I believe that, if we wish to make the world a more rational place, one of the things we must do is to begin to change the paradigm where religious "faith" is considered just another acceptable way to look at the world. It isn't.

By definition, believing in something that isn't there is a delusion, and we must begin calling it what it truly is, however rude, abrasive and condescending it may sound. By accurately and correctly portraying religious delusion, we can, hopefully, begin to move society to stop giving such ridiculous notions a "pass," and make critical assessments of them more acceptable and even more common.

When belief in an invisible and imaginary friend in the sky becomes something to be embarrassed about, instead of something to proudly brandish as a moral or political credential, such beliefs will become less acceptable, less popular and much less common, and I think the world will become a much better place.

I know my approach makes anti-theists like me seem like the "bad guys," and I've already accepted that. But I believe that, in the end, we will be vindicated by history. And even if we aren't, I know it's the right thing to do.


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 22 months ago from Essex, UK

Very effectively elucidated Paladin. Theists just do not see any of these contradictions in their faith do they? They will heap all praise on to God for everything good that happens or that humans do, but absolve him of blame for everything bad that happens or that humans do. (I guess Lucifer makes a convenient 'scapegoat' for that). And even when God himself is directly implicated in making a decision - as in the case of non-forgiveness of blasphemy - the harshness and cruelty implied in that decision is seemingly ignored by theists.

I find most of the comments here and your responses both thoughtful and enlightened and it is difficult to add anything new to them. Your article presents a very good argument Paladin. Oh well, if we're wrong, I guess we're all destined for Hell! (If you go first, save me a nice warm place by the fire - but not too close. I have sensitive skin!) Alun :)


Paladin_ profile image

Paladin_ 22 months ago from Michigan, USA Author

Thanks, Alun! If you have trouble finding me in Hell, just follow the laughter. I'll be in the corner, playing word games with Hitchens, Sagan and Russell! :-)


Stargrrl 20 months ago

Paladin, how do you know you have blasphemed the HS? I don't believe you know how to do it. Blasphemy is not taking the Lord's name in vain or saying you do not believe...you have to deny the works of the HS and claim it's from the devil instead. I don't believe that Hitler, Bin Ladin, or the priest sought forgiveness before they died. Bin Laden was not a Christian, and it's highly doubtful that Hitler snapped out of his dementia to receive Christ. It is up to God.


jonnycomelately profile image

jonnycomelately 20 months ago from Tasmania

Stargrrl, I tried writing a reply to you, but only came up with feelings of sadness in the shadow of your religious fanaticism.... so I deleted it all and just wrote this.


Paladin_ profile image

Paladin_ 20 months ago from Michigan, USA Author

Thanks, Stargrrl and Jonny, for reading, and for your comments. Stargrrl, upon what reference do you define blasphemy? Your description is pretty specific -- especially with regard to attributing something to Satan.

Jesus makes it clear in Matthew 12 that "blasphemy" is simply speaking against God, without any specific context or particulars:

"...Wherefore I say unto you, All manner of sin and blasphemy shall be forgiven unto men: but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men. And whosoever speaketh a word against the Son of man, it shall be forgiven him: but whosoever speaketh against the Holy Ghost, it shall not be forgiven him, neither in this world, neither in the world to come..."

So there's really no getting around it -- Even if I haven't technically "blasphemed" (although, according to Jesus' own definition, I HAVE), I've still spoken against "the Holy Ghost." According to either definition, I've committed an unforgiveable sin. So my question remains: Do I deserve to spend an eternity in Hell (which is the ultimate destination for those not written in the "book")?

If you believe I do, then I submit to you that your morals are questionable.

If you don't believe I do, then you're asserting your own moral judgment over that of Jesus himself (and demonstrating that yours is infinitely superior)!. At the very least, this should make you see the rest of Christian "morality" in a new, more skeptical light.


TheBizWhiz 17 months ago

I am sure Bin Laden didn't ask Jesus for forgiveness since he was a muslim. I am surprised none of the people that congratulated you on a well written Hub took notice. So much for joining the Brights! Lol


Paladin_ profile image

Paladin_ 17 months ago from Michigan, USA Author

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I must have missed that part of the New Testament that specifies that one must first be a Christian to ask Jesus for forgiveness (actually, I thought that's what becoming a Christian is all about!)

In any case, thanks for visiting!


TheBizWhiz 17 months ago

But why would Bin Laden ask Jesus for forgiveness? That just doesn't make sense.


Greensleeves Hubs profile image

Greensleeves Hubs 17 months ago from Essex, UK

TheBizWhiz; You mention in your previous comment that Bin Laden would not have asked Jesus for forgiveness, and you say you are:

'surprised none of the people that congratulated you on a well written Hub took notice. So much for joining the Brights!'

As one of those who congratulated Paladin, I will defend us both. No one is suggesting Bin Laden DID ask for forgiveness. The speculation by Paladin was merely that IF he had asked, then he could have been forgiven for all his crimes against humanity, according to scripture. Whereas an atheist who cannot repent due to a lack of belief in any God (Muslim or Christian) would not be forgiven.

It was a purely hypothetical point as I understood it, to emphasise the difference in scriptural forgiveness between the 'crime' of blasphemy, and all crimes - however evil - which are perpetrated against human beings. No one, least of all Paladin, is suggesting that Bin Laden is now happily ensconced in Heaven!


TheBizWhiz 17 months ago

Greensleeves said: "No one is suggesting Bin Laden DID ask for forgiveness. The speculation by Paladin was merely that IF he had asked, then he could have been forgiven for all his crimes against humanity, according to scripture."

the author said (after the question was asked btw): "Hitler, Geoghan and bin Laden, despite their lives of evil, are guaranteed a place in Heaven if they sincerely sought forgiveness through Jesus before they died."

The question posed and possible answers given was:

"Let's begin this hub with a short little quiz. According to the Bible, which of the following people CANNOT get into Heaven?

(a) Adolph Hitler (genocidal warmonger)

(b) Father John Geoghan (serial child molester)

(c) Andrew Carnegie (American industrialist and billionaire)

(d) Osama bin Laden (Islamic terrorist organizer and financier)"

No where did it present a hypothetical situation.

Which one CANNOT get into heaven according to the Bible. It did not give a hypothetical situation where bin Laden would ask forgiveness. It asked who would and would not. The fact is bin Laden would not ask Jesus for forgiveness, just like Carnegie wouldn't ask Jesus because neither believed he was the Savior.

You said: "It was a purely hypothetical point as I understood it, to emphasise the difference in scriptural forgiveness between the 'crime' of blasphemy, and all crimes - however evil - which are perpetrated against human beings."

That was not how it was presented. I mean, hypothetically if Carnegie asked Jesus for forgiveness then he would go to heaven, because asking implies believing. Now, if the author had given three names of Christians who performed horrible acts and also Carnegie, then the question would have made more sense.


Titen-Sxull profile image

Titen-Sxull 17 months ago from back in the lab again

If Bin Laden sincerely repented and turned to Jesus at his death than many forms of Christianity, and scripture itself, suggest that he would have gone to Heaven. The only way Paladin was even remotely wrong in posing this point is if we were talking about Calvinists who think salvation can only be a work of God and that God chooses who is saved and who is damned - and even then Bin Laden could have turned out to be one of God's elect.

The point is that Christianity is based on vicarious redemption and anyone can be saved regardless of how heinous their misdeeds. This point is not negated by the unlikelihood of the example.

Hell Paladin could have said that the evil Transformer Megatron could repent on his death bed and get into Heaven, the observation would be just as in-tact and sound - whosoever believeth will have eternal life.


TheBizWhiz 17 months ago

"The point is that Christianity is based on vicarious redemption and anyone can be saved regardless of how heinous their misdeeds."

I agree because I have struggled with this question myself.

"This point is not negated by the unlikelihood of the example."

I also never said it negated the point. I just said the question didn't make any sense and I am surprised no atheist called him on it. That's all.

The question is the premise for the whole hub, but was incorrect yet could be easily corrected. I was just pointing that out.


Paladin_ profile image

Paladin_ 17 months ago from Michigan, USA Author

Biz, OF COURSE my little quiz included hypotheticals. As Titen explained, they were offered to illustrate the point that, no matter how sinister or malevolent a person was in life, he (or she) is still guaranteed a place in Heaven if he accepts Jesus' (supposed) sacrifice, while someone who 'blasphemes' God -- no matter how good or benevolent they are -- are condemned to an eternity of suffering and torment.

Since we're discussing hypotheticals, I'll offer you another --

If I hadn't included Bin Laden on my list, would you still have an argument, or are you simply nattering on about something that has no relevance to the main issue?


TheBizWhiz 17 months ago

Paladin said: "If I hadn't included Bin Laden on my list, would you still have an argument, or are you simply nattering on about something that has no relevance to the main issue?"

Of course, which is why earlier I said: "Now, if the author had given three names of Christians who performed horrible acts and also Carnegie, then the question would have made more sense."

Heck, I even offered you to put another Christian in his place, so are you satisfied? So instead of just saying "my bad, I will correct my mistake" you guys have just gone on and on "nattering" about how you are not wrong. Just man up and say "my bad".

I just had a situation where I used one word that changed the meaning of an important statement. Another hubber pointed this out and in the end I could see his point. Therefore I made the correction and admitted my wrong doing. It was in my hub for the comfort theory of atheism and agnosticism if you would like to see.

If I was nitpicking over the spelling of "course" versus "coarse", then yes I can see how that would bother you, but the whole premise of your question supported your hub and the question was wrong. This is why I pointed it out.


jonnycomelately profile image

jonnycomelately 17 months ago from Tasmania

"You can't save an atheist....." Well, I have no wish to be saved, or forgiven, or protected from my own folly, thanks all the same.

Just dump my body into a compost heap, with lots of lovely sawdust below me and above me. Then, in about a year's time I will be ripe for recycling into food plants, like cabbages, potatoes, peas, beans, turnips, etc. All good food for life..... and how many other life-forms will thus benefit from my passing?

Interesting that not one of those other life-forms has any clue about a "God" out there.


Paladin_ profile image

Paladin_ 17 months ago from Michigan, USA Author

Biz, OF COURSE you're nitpicking. You and I both know that the premise of the hub is the same whether or not Bin Laden -- a Muslim -- is included in my list or not.

As for correcting my "mistake," I made none -- at least none that you've pointed out. As I already stated -- and as you SURELY already know -- Bin Laden or anyone else can ask Jesus' forgiveness and enter into Heaven. So the example is perfectly valid.

Thanks for playing, though. ;-)


TheBizWhiz 17 months ago

Paladin said: "As I already stated -- and as you SURELY already know -- Bin Laden or anyone else can ask Jesus' forgiveness and enter into Heaven. So the example is perfectly valid."

Well then so can Carnegie! lol Then that is another reason this question is a mistake. If that is your hypothetical situation then the question is not valid because, like you said, anyone can ask for Jesus' forgiveness, including Carnegie.

I will make this as simple as possible.

First, you didn't ask a hypothetical question. You asked:

"According to the Bible, which of the following people CANNOT get into Heaven?"

Key word is "according" because a hypothetical question is one that is:

"A question, based on assumptions rather than facts, directed to an expert witness intended to elicit an opinion."

Your question asked "according to the Bible", which means the answer is one that can be checked as a fact, which is "what does the Bible say". Whether or not the Bible is fact is irrelevant because you asked what it said, therefore I can go and check what it said, which makes the answer one that can be witnessed because I can check the Bible.

Now, a hypothetical question is one like: "Who would win between the 1992 Chicago Bulls and the 2014 Miami Heat."

That is something that cannot be checked as fact...ever. So if you wanted to ask a hypothetical question for this Hub, you would ask:

"If bin Laden asked Jesus for forgiveness before he died, would he go to Heaven?"

You never mentioned in your Hub that bin Laden asked Jesus for forgiveness, but for some reason now in the comments section you are.

Btw, you said: "Biz, OF COURSE you're nitpicking."

No, that is not nitpicking because it is the basis for your whole Hub. I keep going because you cannot seem to admit to an obvious mistake. Why can't you just man up and admit it?


Paladin_ profile image

Paladin_ 17 months ago from Michigan, USA Author

Biz, did you even bother to read the rest of the hub, beyond the irrelevant point you singled out for nitpicking?

It's true that I misspoke in my most recent comments (it's the price I pay for posting in a hurry and not re-reading my comments). I stated that anyone can ask forgiveness when, of course, that only applies to those who haven't blasphemed against God -- as Andrew Carnegie did.

To borrow your own phrase, I will make this as simple as possible (if it helps, please read slowly):

-----

Andrew Carnegie, an altruistic philanthropist, CANNOT go to Heaven because he blasphemed against God.

Killers like Hitler and Bin Laden and child molesters like Geoghan CAN go to Heaven because they DIDN'T blaspheme against God.

ALL of them can ask forgiveness, but only Carnegie can never get it, because of his 'sin' of blasphemy.

------

Got it? This is the fundamental premise of my hub, and is unmistakable to anyone who bothers to read it.

So, do you actually have a problem with the ACTUAL premise of this hub, or do you prefer to keep droning on about a minor point that is irrelevant?


TheBizWhiz 17 months ago

You said; "Andrew Carnegie, an altruistic philanthropist, CANNOT go to Heaven because he blasphemed against God."

How do you know they didn't blaspheme God?

But you also said: "Hitler, Geoghan and bin Laden, despite their lives of evil, are guaranteed a place in Heaven if they sincerely sought forgiveness through Jesus before they died."

Corinthians 15:22 said: "For as in Adam ALL die, so also in Christ shall ALL be made alive."

So according to the Bible and you I found validation that he can get in. All people can be forgiven, which would include those who blasphemed against the holy spirit, which is a Universalist point of view.

Now that this little matter is cleared up, are you going to address the fact that you didn't ask a hypothetical question? I gave you a definition, so if you didn't know before, then you did now.


Paladin_ profile image

Paladin_ 17 months ago from Michigan, USA Author

Biz, I don't know that those others didn't blaspheme against God, and if I did know, I wouldn't have used them as examples. In any case, I'm glad to see you're finally addressing the actual premise of the hub. We're making progress...

Of course, you're absolutely incorrect that "all people can be forgiven." This is clearly and directly contradicted by the New Testament verses I quoted in the hub -- supposedly from Jesus' own mouth, and repeated in three of the four gospels.

Are you going to contradict Jesus' own words?


TheBizWhiz 17 months ago

"I'm glad to see you're finally addressing the actual premise of the hub. We're making progress..."

No we are not because you just don't seem to grasp your mistake and it seems you never will.

On another note; my sister teaches special needs children and she told me it was mentally exhausting to do so. Now I know what she means.

I have spent all of this time and effort showing someone what is right and wrong and in the end, that person is still the same as before; no better or worse. I guess when a person is at as low as they can go, they have no where but up. You should look at that as the bright side.


Paladin_ profile image

Paladin_ 17 months ago from Michigan, USA Author

Okay, we'll play your game for a while. This should prove to be fascinating. ;-)

Biz, please tell me again what my supposed "mistake" was. I listed four persons in a hypothetical scenario: three of them horrible persons (murderers and child molesters), one of them an altruistic philanthropist.

The first three -- regardless of their monstrous crimes, can (or could have, before their deaths) ask for and receive forgiveness for their sins by accepting Jesus' supposed sacrifice. The fourth cannot -- regardless of his good deeds -- for he committed the one unforgiveable sin, blaspheming God.

Judging from your previous rants, your complaint appears to be that Osama Bin Laden (one of the first three) was a Muslim. Are you claiming it's impossible for a Muslim to ask Jesus' forgiveness and enter Heaven?

If not, what is your problem with my list?

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