Different Types of Pagodas - Structures Information and Facts

Nine Story Pagoda

Xumi Pagoda
Xumi Pagoda

Xumi Pagoda

The Xumi Pagoda (also called Sumeru or Summer Pagoda) is a Buddhist pagoda from Hebei province, China. The 48 meters tall pagoda was built in 636 AD during the reign of Taizong Emperor of the Tang dynasty (618 – 907). However, the monastery that once surrounded the Xumi pagoda has largely been destroyed, with the exception of a few structures.

Xumi Pagoda has 9 tiers of eaves and a crowning spire, its interior is hollow and also lacks a staircase to reach the higher floors. There is a big stone body of a Chinese mythical beast, bixi in the shape of a tortoise-like dragon near the arched doorway leading into the pagoda. The left side of its body had been broken off and missing but in 2000 it was found during an excavation at a nearby street.

Miruksa Pagoda - South Korea

Mireuksa Pagoda
Mireuksa Pagoda

Mireuksa Pagoda

The stone pagoda at Miruksa is the oldest and largest of all Korean pagodas. According to Samguk Yusa (Memorabilia of the Three Dynasty), king Mu and his queen saw a vision of Maitreya Buddha at a pond on Mount Yonghwasan during their way to Sajaya Temple. The King promptly had the pond drained in order to establish the Mireuksa complex.

The temple has one wooden pagoda and two stone pagodas: Dongtap (east pagoda), Seotop (west pagoda) as well as halls for the image of Buddha behind the pagodas.

Heavenly Lady Pagoda - Seven Stories Pagoda

Thien Mu Pagoda Vietnam
Thien Mu Pagoda Vietnam

Thien Mu Pagoda Vietnam

According to their legend, the people around the place where the Thien Mu Pagoda now stands used to see a vision of a lady. She always said that someday a great leader would come here and build a pagoda to bring peace and prosperity to the country. Upon hearing this story, the Lord Nguyen Hoang ordered the construction of the pagoda and named it Thien Mu Pagoda (Heavenly Lady Pagoda).

This pagoda has 7 stories and is the tallest pagoda in Vietnam. The pagoda stands on the Ha Khe Hill, constructed by the Nguyen dynasty andd sits on the northern bank of the Perfume River. Among the many interesting artifacts housed at the peaceful complex is the car that took the popular and brave monk Thich Quang Duc to his self-immolation in 1963 Saigon.

Five Story Pagoda

Toji Pagoda
Toji Pagoda

Toji Pagoda Japan

Toji (meaning Eastern Temple) is a Buddhist temple in Kyoto, Japan. It is best known by many people for its beautiful five-story pagoda, the highest wooden tower in Japan. Toji pagoda is 57 meters tall (180-foot). However, this Toji pagoda was once struck by lightning and burned down, the current Toji pagoda was reconstructed in 1695 by order of the 3rd Tokugawa Shogun, Iemitsu. The Toji pagoda has been and remains to be a symbol of Kyoto.

Three Story Pagoda Hong Kong

Tsui Sing Lau Pagoda
Tsui Sing Lau Pagoda

Tsui Sing Lau Pagoda

The Tsui Sing Lau Pagoda is Hongkong’s only surviving ancient pagoda. Also called as The Pagoda of Gathering Stars, this pagoda was declared a monument in 2001. According to the legend, Tang Yin-tung dreamt of many stars in the sky that gathered together and fell onto the place where the Tsui Sing Lau pagoda now stands. He then consulted his feng shui master about this and the feng shui expert advise him to build a Buddhist pagoda on that spot. After building the pagoda, the Tang clan of Ping Shan produced numerous scholars and officials.

The pagoda was also built to improve feng shui of the locality such as ward off evil spirits from the north and prevent flooding disasters to the village.

Three Story Pagoda Japan

Ichijoji pagoda
Ichijoji pagoda

Ichijoji pagoda

Hokkesan Ichijoji is a temple from the Tendai sect in Kasai, Hyogo, Japan. The temple was established by the instruction of Emperor Kotoku in 650. Hodo Sennin, a high ranked priest from India (a legendary high priest) was reported to be the one who founded the Ichijoji temple.

The three-story Ichijoji pagoda (one of the oldest pagoda) and Prince Shotoku’s statue as well as the high ranking priest of the Tendai sect were all designated as National Treasures.

One Story Pagoda

One Pillar Pagoda
One Pillar Pagoda

One Pillar Pagoda

One Pillar Pagoda (other name: Chua Mot Cot) is built by emperor Ly Thai Tong. According to the story, the emperor did not have a child so he often went to the temple and pagoda to pray for a baby. One day, he dreamt that bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara sitting on a lotus flower in a pond, handed him a baby son. Months later, his wife bore him a son. The emperor was so happy that he ordered his men to build One Pillar Pagoda which resembles a lotus in a pond.

Today, the One Pillar Pagoda is one of the most poplar tourist attractions in Hanoi, the capital of Vietnam.

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