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The Bible and morality

  1. Brian in Canada profile image61
    Brian in Canadaposted 4 years ago

    http://s1.hubimg.com/u/7165576.jpg
    Should the Bible be our source for morality?

    1. youcanwin profile image38
      youcanwinposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Yes, of course.  There is no other book equal to Bible for morality.

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        Rad Manposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        So you must be in favour of rape, murder and slavery.

        1. Chris Neal profile image82
          Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          I'm not, but I still believe that the Bible should be our source for morality. In fact, it really already is. The majority of western law is based on Biblical principals.

          1. twosheds1 profile image61
            twosheds1posted 4 years ago in reply to this

            How is the "majority of western law" based on the Bible?

            1. Chris Neal profile image82
              Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Don't kill
              Don't steal
              Don't sleep with someone you're not married to (until relatively recent times, now go for it)
              Don't hurt people
              Don't enslave people

              These and the ten thousand variations are out of the Bible. Many western courts even had copies of the Ten Commandments in them. Many still do.

              1. psycheskinner profile image81
                psycheskinnerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                They are in the Bible, they are also in codes of law that predate the bible or were developed in non Christian nations.  hey are also pretty obviously stuff people don';t want done to them not matter what their creed.

                1. Chris Neal profile image82
                  Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  That doesn't change my point. Western nations largely based their legal codes on the Bible. It was in places where things started getting weird that they strayed from the Bible. Maybe not so much in Eastern nations, but most Western ones did.

                  1. psycheskinner profile image81
                    psycheskinnerposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    I disagree with your point.  The western codes are based largely on avoiding harm and supporting a civil society.  They are essentially the same as any first world nations code, Christian or not.

                    The truly weird laws are those that are explicitly religion in structure as they are not contained by utilitarian principle of avoid harm but purely on scripture.

                    Their explicit basis is in *Roman* Law.

              2. Paul Wingert profile image78
                Paul Wingertposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                So basiaclly some people out there need a Bible as a morality tool even though these "moralities" are basic common sense. Have there ever been a time in history where people were able to think for themselves?

                1. Chris Neal profile image82
                  Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  If there ever has, this isn't it.

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                  Rad Manposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  The problem is not every one thinks. Unfortunately there are those who need to think someone is always watching. Let those hold onto it. We know the truth.

                3. Chris Neal profile image82
                  Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  P.S. - Reading the Bible and thinking for yourself are not mutually exclusive.

              3. twosheds1 profile image61
                twosheds1posted 4 years ago in reply to this

                So other cultures that don't have a Christian background allow theft, murder and adultry? Before the Bible those things were allowed?

                And do I need to cite all the crazy hookups from the Bible? (e.g., Lot's daughters sleeping with him)

                1. Chris Neal profile image82
                  Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  Whoa! Let's rumble!

                  Okay, my point is that modern western cultures pattern a lot of their laws on the Bible. If you want to discuss the origins of morality in general, fine. But my point stands, and that's it.

                  Crazy hookups, hmmm....

                  I've often said (and it's not original to me) that it's a huge mistake to think that just because something is recorded in the Bible means that the Bible says it's a good thing. Just because God didn't come down and smite Lot's daughters on the spot doesn't mean they "got away with it," let alone that God approved of what they were doing. The descendents of Lot's daughters were groups that were at odds with the Israelites historically. Then they disappeared. To us in the 21st century, that may not seem like such a big deal but to people back then, it was a very big deal indeed. The descendents of Lot and his daughters did not share in the Blessing. God most certainly did not approve of what they were doing.

                  People keep pulling that one out. Got any others?

                  1. twosheds1 profile image61
                    twosheds1posted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    Marriage, specifically:

                    - An arranged marriage—Genesis 24:1-4 (and many other passages)

                    - A levirate marriage (If a man died leaving no male heir, his brother was required to marry his widow and produce children)—Deuteronomy 25:5-10

                    - A polygamous marriage—1 Kings 11:3 (and many, many other passages)

                    - Not inter-racial—Deuteronomy 7:14; 1 Corinthians 7:39; 2 Corinthians 6:14

                    -- Not allowed to be dissolved, i.e. NO DIVORCE—Matthew 5:31-32; Mark 10:2-12; Luke 16:18

                    - Except when the man wanted to because his wife had become ‘displeasing’ to him—Deuteronomy 24:1-4

                    - Between a rapist and his victim—Deuteronomy 22:28-29

                    - An arranged marriage by a slave owner for his slaves—Genesis 24:4

                    - Can be between brother and sister—How else do you explain where Cain’s wife came from!

                    - Intended to produce children—Without children a woman was:
                    Shamed—a barren woman was looked upon as cursed by God
                    Unable to be saved—1 Timothy 2:15

                    Re: the US basing its laws on anything in the Bible, the Constitution was based on the Magna Carta and classical Greek political thought. Law in practice is based on English common law, where court precedent is followed.

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            Rad Manposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            I don't know Chris, we have laws against rape, murder, slavery and extortion.

            1. Chris Neal profile image82
              Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Yeah, and they mostly came from Biblical morality and frameworks.

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                Rad Manposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Where does the bible condemn slavery?

                1. Chris Neal profile image82
                  Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  Try the entire New Testament.

                  Even the Old Testament was very particular about slavery. And remember that the OT was taking place in one specific place and time and was for one specific people, the Israelites. But they had strict rules about 'slavery', they didn't hold chattel slaves for life. And the NT makes clear that all men are created equal (which is where the American Founding Fathers got that) and even says that slaves should try to win their freedom if they can.

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                    Rad Manposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    So it doesn't tell the slave owners to release and pay these people at once?

                  2. Mark Knowles profile image59
                    Mark Knowlesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    Perhaps you could quote it for us Chris? I don't recall Jesus saying anything against slavery - but maybe that is my lack of knowledge. wink

        2. Jonathan Janco profile image80
          Jonathan Jancoposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Don't forget incest, pedophilia, polygamy, genocide, human sacrifice, defrauding and betraying members of your own family . . .

          1. Chris Neal profile image82
            Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            And where, exactly, does the Bible tell anybody to commit those things?

      2. Castlepaloma profile image23
        Castlepalomaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Sodom and Gomorrah USA is living proof of predominate Christians behavior, who needs words to express those morals

        1. Chris Neal profile image82
          Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          I would point out that Sodom and Gomorrah USA is actually proof of the Bible's veracity. In the OT people were constantly doing what God told them not to. Some of  them were even busy attempting to justify it using the very laws that God had set up. Not unlike western countries today, in fact not unlike the world.

          Jesus told us that we should be careful because many people who think they're going to Heaven because they call themselves Christian will be unpleasantly surprised (the parables of the Sheep and the Goats and the Wide and Narrow Path.)

          The behavior of people who call themselves 'christian' is not proof that the Bible is false.

          1. Castlepaloma profile image23
            Castlepalomaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Just proof that it dose not work for most people on earth because they are not interested or even greater, not aware JC exist and most Christain are not Christ like anyways.

            Find something that works for most, like love without all the conditions of love like in the Bible - a instruction book to God - (Yahweh or the Hell way)

            1. Chris Neal profile image82
              Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Point A I completely agree with.

              Point B, I would love to see. It doesn't exist. I was born in the 60's and was surrounded growing up by college-educated, east-coast liberal types who believed in that stuff. So where is it?

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                Rad Manposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                It's called the Law or the Constitution.

                1. Castlepaloma profile image23
                  Castlepalomaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  There is no god, yahweh or JC written into the Constiuition
                  How will Chris understand these laws without a JC cherry pickin stamp

                  1. Chris Neal profile image82
                    Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    Reread the Constitution.

                    And thanks for the cred.

    2. twosheds1 profile image61
      twosheds1posted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Oh yeah, definitely! Here's my guide:

      Psalms 137:9 - Happy shall he be, that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones.

      Malachi 2:3 - Behold, I will corrupt your seed, and spread dung upon your faces

      1 Timothy 2:12 - But I suffer not a woman to teach, nor to usurp authority over the man, but to be in silence.

      Deuteronomy 28:53 - And thou shalt eat the fruit of thine own body, the flesh of thy sons and of thy daughters, which the Lord thy God hath given thee

      OK, who wants dung spread on their face? Line up now, 'cause I gotta go!

      1. Chris Neal profile image82
        Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        You gotta love people who intentionally misquote the Bible!

        1. twosheds1 profile image61
          twosheds1posted 4 years ago in reply to this

          How did I misquote it? I copied those from biblegateway.com. They might have been take out of context, so let's look at the context, shall we?

          Here's all of Psalm 137:
          137 By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion.

          2 We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof.

          3 For there they that carried us away captive required of us a song; and they that wasted us required of us mirth, saying, Sing us one of the songs of Zion.

          4 How shall we sing the Lord's song in a strange land?

          5 If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning.

          6 If I do not remember thee, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth; if I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy.

          7 Remember, O Lord, the children of Edom in the day of Jerusalem; who said, Rase it, rase it, even to the foundation thereof.

          8 O daughter of Babylon, who art to be destroyed; happy shall he be, that rewardeth thee as thou hast served us.

          9 Happy shall he be, that taketh and dasheth thy little ones against the stones.

          Quote the whole thing, and it gets weirder! Speaking of weirder, here's Malachi 2: 1-4: And now, O ye priests, this commandment is for you.

          2 If ye will not hear, and if ye will not lay it to heart, to give glory unto my name, saith the Lord of hosts, I will even send a curse upon you, and I will curse your blessings: yea, I have cursed them already, because ye do not lay it to heart.

          3 Behold, I will corrupt your seed, and spread dung upon your faces, even the dung of your solemn feasts; and one shall take you away with it.

          4 And ye shall know that I have sent this commandment unto you, that my covenant might be with Levi, saith the Lord of hosts.

          Shall I quote all of 1 Timothy 2? It gets worse.

          1. Chris Neal profile image82
            Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Um, this is what's called poetry. You know, meter, allegory, allusion? You might as well call Robert Frost or Lord Byron's stuff weird on the same ground. Maybe you do, I don't know. It's not uncommon to call stuff you don't understand weird, I've certainly done it. But still, this is poetry.


            This was God speaking to Levite priests who were supposed to uphold His holy name but who instead defiled themselves by partaking in practices they were forbidden to do, then calling on the name of the Lord as if they had done nothing wrong. God said He would not accept their sacrifices anymore and went on to use some colorful language. If you'd bothered to quote the verses before and after that (in other words,  in context) that would have become pretty clear.

            I wish you would because from what I can make out from where you did 'quote' 1 verse of 1 Timothy 2, I don't know where you get that. If you can show it to me I would appreciate it.

            1. twosheds1 profile image61
              twosheds1posted 4 years ago in reply to this

              I exhort therefore, that, first of all, supplications, prayers, intercessions, and giving of thanks, be made for all men;

              2 For kings, and for all that are in authority; that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and honesty.

              3 For this is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Saviour;

              4 Who will have all men to be saved, and to come unto the knowledge of the truth.

              5 For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus;

              6 Who gave himself a ransom for all, to be testified in due time.

              7 Whereunto I am ordained a preacher, and an apostle, (I speak the truth in Christ, and lie not;) a teacher of the Gentiles in faith and verity.

              8 I will therefore that men pray every where, lifting up holy hands, without wrath and doubting.

              9 In like manner also, that women adorn themselves in modest apparel, with shamefacedness and sobriety; not with broided hair, or gold, or pearls, or costly array;

              10 But (which becometh women professing godliness) with good works.

              11 Let the woman learn in silence with all subjection.

              12 But I suffer not a woman to teach, nor to usurp authority over the man, but to be in silence.

              13 For Adam was first formed, then Eve.

              14 And Adam was not deceived, but the woman being deceived was in the transgression.

              15 Notwithstanding she shall be saved in childbearing, if they continue in faith and charity and holiness with sobriety.

              What I take from that is that women shouldn't adorn themselves (i.e., not wear jewelry or makeup) and act is if they are shamed. Modest apparel, yeah, I get that. That's pretty reasonable, I guess, though I think women should be able to decide what they want to wear. But in verse 12, it says women shouldn't teach or have authority over a man (can't have a woman boss, I guess) and should be silent. Verse 11 tells women to shut up in general. There's also a verse (not in Tim, I forget where) that says that women must be silent in church. My Coptic Orthodox brother-in-law maintains that because of that, women should not be ministers. His wife, my wife's sister, disagrees, as I do.

              It's easy to say that the OT is outdated and no longer applicable, but Tim. is the NT. And OK, you don't like tats (neither do I) but you can't swing a dead cat without hitting someone with a Jesus or other religious tattoo. I did a Google Images search and got 34 million hits.  Granted, some are satirical (Hello Kitty Jesus being my favorite) but obviously not everyone has a problem with them.

              So how does one choose which parts of the OT to follow and which to ignore?

              1. Chris Neal profile image82
                Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                This part of 1 Timothy is controversial even within the evangelical (conservative) Protestant churches. It's pretty well agreed that women should not be in the pulpit, but there are women leaders. And lots of men have women bosses, I certainly have. I don't find that unbliblical.

                Yeah, I know there are Jesus tattoos. I see them. I think they're weird but if I was 26 and not 46 I might think differently. I don't know. I don't get weirded out by guys with long hair. I used to be one (before I became a Christian.)

                And for the record, my wife was far more against women in the pulpit than I am. I'm not in favor, but my wife's reaction was occasionally something to behold.

                As for which parts of the OT to follow and which to discard, well, technically we don't discard any of it. However, the most direct answer to your question, as far as I have been able to figure out, is that it's between the individual and God. Obviously, nobody does the animal sacrifices or stones the blashphemers any more. And even parts that the church leaders believe we should be following are discarded by Joe in the Pew all t he time (and more often that they should be, discarded by the pastors and leaders as well.) The obvious is that some things (like the sacrifices and stonings) applied to specific people in a specific time and place. Others, like do not kill, do not steal, are just common sense, though people still do them. Others, like have no other gods before me, are ones that Christians should be practicing but don't.

                1. twosheds1 profile image61
                  twosheds1posted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  "It's pretty well agreed that women should not be in the pulpit, but there are women leaders."
                  Apparently you're not a Methodist. They have tons of women as pastors. For example, the last three pastors at the church where we have our Boy Scout meetings have all had women as pastors.

                  "it's between the individual and God."
                  But the official position (if Pretestant churches can be said to have one) is against homosexuality, for example, because of Lev. 18. They're not leaving it up to the individual.

                  "Obviously, nobody does the animal sacrifices or stones the blashphemers any more."
                  Obviously, you go to the wrong church! big_smile What has happened, in effect, is that those parts of the OT (or the NT, for that matter) that we find distasteful in a modern context are discarded. We no longer use the Bible to justify slavery, for example. So Biblical morality has conceded to modernity.

                  1. Chris Neal profile image82
                    Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    You're right, I'm not a Methodist. smile I tried to differentiate by referring to conservative churches. So 'mainline' or 'liberal' churches like Methodist and Episcopalian, I don't generally comment on.

                    Goes back to my statement about things being discarded. And for what it's worth, there's almost as much division about homosexuality as there is about women in the pulpit.

                    Actually, modernity caught up with the Bible vis-a-vis slavery. But your point is right, I think I said pretty much the same thing. Instead of trying to wrestle with what things actually mean and live our lives according to God's Word, we discard what we don't like and live as we please. I'm not excluding myself from that.

    3. gloriajeanjones profile image60
      gloriajeanjonesposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      We most certainly should take notice of what it says about immorality. Look at Sodom and Gommorah they were destroyed because of their sexual conduct. Marrage is sacred and the reason why is because if we all stuck to one partner then STI's wouldn't  happen and that's why Jahovah gives us the bible and it's warnings. It clearly states that man shall not lie with man what it doesn't say is ' or thy shall get AIDS' God left that for us to find out AFTER Men disobeyed him.  It also tells us to abstain from blood-the reason is two fold. 1-Because it belongs to him and 2- Blood contains diseases that cannot be detected until it's in the body. If you go through the Bible you will see many examples of those who ignored the warnings about immorality and their punishments. It's not written there for nothing. So for those of you who take the P out of it I'd be careful if I were you, ever heard of Armageddon, well unless you want to die when that takes place I'd start reading it if I were you and then put it into practice. Oh and by the way if you look at the end of Revelation it tell you that for those who add or take away from it the penalty is death (at armageddon that is) This includeds MIS-QUOTES or mis translations.

      1. twosheds1 profile image61
        twosheds1posted 4 years ago in reply to this

        So if you're gonna quote Leviticus, I must ask, why follow Lev. 18 & 20, which speaks of "men lying with men as with women" and not Lev. 19, which expressly forbids tattoos? And speaking of the Biblical definition of marriage, let's have a look:

        - An arranged marriage—Genesis 24:1-4 (and many other passages)

        - A levirate marriage (If a man died leaving no male heir, his brother was required to marry his widow and produce children)—Deuteronomy 25:5-10

        - A polygamous marriage—1 Kings 11:3 (and many, many other passages)

        - Not inter-racial—Deuteronomy 7:14; 1 Corinthians 7:39; 2 Corinthians 6:14

        - Filled with sexual prohibitions—no intercourse during menstruation (The woman is unclean. Yet another degradation of women.) —The woman cannot withhold sex from her husband; she has to fulfill his desire for sex when he wants it. (And another example of the Bible’s misogyny)

        - Not allowed to be dissolved, i.e. NO DIVORCE—Matthew 5:31-32; Mark 10:2-12; Luke 16:18

        - Except when the man wanted to because his wife had become ‘displeasing’ to him—Deuteronomy 24:1-4

        - Between a rapist and his victim—Deuteronomy 22:28-29

        - An arranged marriage by a slave owner for his slaves—Genesis 24:4

        - Can be between brother and sister—How else do you explain where Cain’s wife came from!

        - Intended to produce children—Without children a woman was:
        Shamed—a barren woman was looked upon as cursed by God
        Unable to be saved—1 Timothy 2:15

        1. Chris Neal profile image82
          Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Wow!

          Jesus said (since you're quoting Jesus) that the men who sent their wives away "because they were displeasing to them" GOT IT WRONG! God hates divorce under any circumstances, and only when the man us unfaithful to his wife is the wife allowed to leave. The man is WRONG, WRONG, WRONG to send his wife away for any circumstance he pleases (Jesus said Moses allowed it because their "hearts were hard." That means He knew that Moses couldn't stop it but he still shouldn't have allowed it.)

          If you're gonna quote, quote right. Don't mix and match contexts. That's the worst kind of cherry-picking.

          And I never liked tattoos...

      2. DoubleScorpion profile image87
        DoubleScorpionposted 4 years ago in reply to this



        Sodom and Gommorah were destroyed because of how they treated strangers and others...Marriage in the OT days.. was often between a Man and many women...

        1. Castlepaloma profile image23
          Castlepalomaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Kinda like how USA Porn is larger industry than Hollywood

    4. Brian in Canada profile image61
      Brian in Canadaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I think not only is it foolish but dangerous to recieve your morals from the Bible, especially the old Testament. The Old Testament where God asks his followers to commit genocide, murder and rape as well as displaying himself to be a jealous, murderous and unforgiving God. God, the great dictator in the sky who insults our very integrity as human beings. One would have to be immoral, stupid or brainwashed to recieve their morals from the Bible.

  2. Annsalo profile image85
    Annsaloposted 4 years ago

    Our source of morality should be our brain!

    1. Chris Neal profile image82
      Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Really? And what if my brain is telling me that girls should be protected but that guy over there is being told by his brain that girls are property to be used and disposed of (literally)? Should the brain still be the ultimate source of morality?

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        Rad Manposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        That's what laws are for. It just doesn't or hasn't works to tell people not to do something for fear of the afterlife. Yes, it does work for a few, but most people don't really believe in hell for it to be a deterrent. Lets look at he mafia for example. They are God fearing people who, steal, extort, promote prostitution and launder money and show up for Sunday mass. Most of the world know the 10 commandments, but which one among us hasn't used the Lords name in vain when agree or stolen a pen from work?

        1. Chris Neal profile image82
          Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          So you're agreeing with me? I was disagreeing with her that the brain should be the ultimate source of morality. You and I may disagree on what the ultimate source of morality is or should be, but we are agreeing that it's not the human brain. If I read you correctly.

          1. Annsalo profile image85
            Annsaloposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            The majority of human brains think morally. Even those who don't almost always start life out thinking morally. A child knows stealing is wrong from the very first time they take a penny out of their mother's purse. Just because some CHOOSE not to use their brains doesn't mean the moral compass isn't in there still.

            1. Chris Neal profile image82
              Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Having once been a child myself, and having known many children during my life, I would wonder about that penny stealing thing. Most don't think anything about it the first time. They want the penny, they take the penny. Unless they've been specifically told by Mom or Dad not to, they don't really think about the first time.

              That's not argumentative just for the sake of argument. I think about these things. I do believe that many people have an "inner compass" of morality, but I also see society slipping into a much more 'barbaric' frame of mind, legal statutes notwithstanding. I think a lot about what kind of morality comes naturally to people, and what is conditioned by society (or God.)

              1. Annsalo profile image85
                Annsaloposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Oh I agree that society is slipping, I just don't associate that with a lack of the bible or a God. Another thing that would have to be noted is what one person sees as not moral another does.
                A fetus does not develop a heart beat for around 12 days, so even a pro life person could easily say it is moral to abort as long as it is done prior to 12 days after conception.
                Even if the bible is considered "God's Words" it is written word interpret  by man. So man put his (at the time) morals in it. 
                I can say this, I do not have a bible or God in my life and I live morally. I was not raised by moral parents so I didn't get it there. So if it is not in my brain then where did it come from?

                1. Chris Neal profile image82
                  Chris Nealposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  I agree with that but that actually makes my point (my point being that the human brain is insufficient as as an arbiter of morality.) Yeah, I'm a Christian and I think the Bible (properly understood) should be the center of societal morality but that's not actually my point.

                  As a staunch pro-lifer I would say that it's not the heart beat or the brain patterns or any other single biological function that makes a fetus a human being. And as a pro-lifer I would also point out that this is a slippery slope. Once you start defining what is human by a set of biological precepts, no matter how precise or wide-ranging you attempt to be, you open the door for legislation as to who is and who is not human (which we already have, in effect.) That's how you wind up with T4.

                  As a Calvinist, we could debate what is meant by "written by man." Let me just say that I was not raised in a Christian environment. Your question is both ineresting and worth investigation.

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              Rad Manposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Yes, so we get our moral compass from our peers and family. That's where it came from. We use our brain to make moral judgments and if the brain is mature were good, if not religion or fear of getting caught by the law may be necessary. That's why we were told about Santa a children. He knows who is naughty or nice.

          2. 0
            Rad Manposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            You are reading me correctly. We get our moral compass from family, friends, school and the law and sometimes religion, but that's not necessary. Some need to fear the law, some need to fear the afterlife, some need to think someone is always watching, those are the one that haven't matured properly. We are taught not to hurt others, but some just don't get it. Some are left not having any compassion or empathy, while they make good business men they make lousy companions.

    2. Brian in Canada profile image61
      Brian in Canadaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Annsalo, well said! You have been making some very thoughtful and adept points on this forum. Keep it up!

  3. pisean282311 profile image59
    pisean282311posted 4 years ago

    there r far better books than bible for moral values...bible is relevant in some context but largely it is book written by bunch of people who lives 1900 years ago...many things have changed since then...

    1. twosheds1 profile image61
      twosheds1posted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Also, I think it is more a work of philosophy and parables and not to be taken literally. Granted, it is a 2000-yeaar-old philosophy...

      1. Castlepaloma profile image23
        Castlepalomaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Would you also think of religion as a form of culture, as people have been formed more by culture than race? The English speaking Christian countries I do not feel are that civilized, when you look the state of Sodom and Gomorrah behavior .

  4. rrhistorian profile image60
    rrhistorianposted 4 years ago

    The Bible is a historical collection of facts as documented by people wishing to project thought into a pattern of living that would permit the reader to understand how humans lived during good and bad times.

    If the individual chooses to follow the path of the moral individual then the Bible is a good structure.
    If the individual decides that following the immoral path is good because man and God will forgive them, then it is probably not so good.

    The only way the Bible is a good source for morality is if the individual reading and interpreting the writings is smart enough to recognize the moral requirements.

    This is true for any book that describes the activities that would lead on to a moral life.

    Besides, moral is not a book, but the way you choose to live your life.

    1. A Troubled Man profile image60
      A Troubled Manposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      lol



      If that were the case, they wouldn't need the Bible.

    2. Brian in Canada profile image61
      Brian in Canadaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      If someone decides to receive their morals from the Old Testament I would suggest giving that person a wide berth. The Bible is the most immoral book I have ever read.

 
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