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More Incoherence in Christian Theology

  1. profile image0
    Sooner28posted 4 years ago

    Anytime a Christian is asked a tough question, such as why there are natural disasters or genetic mutations that kill millions of people, they reply that God's ways are "higher" than our ways, and therefore we cannot even come close to understanding what sort of "justification" God would have for allowing such occurences.  If we grant that God is perfectly good, then it is the feebility (is that a word) of the human mind that leads us astray, and not an imperfect world.

    This, initially, sounds like the beginning of an answer to the question of what has been termed "natural evil."  Yet, upon further inspection, the logic completely falls apart, and here's why.

    God is the one who makes the rules of the game.  He created our minds the way they are, with all of their inefficiencies and blunders.  He also made the decision that human beings minds should not be able to understand "his ways" while we are on earth (remember, this is conservative christian theology).  Yet, we are told that once we get to heaven, everything will "make sense," i.e. God will explain the mysteries of the universe and himself to us.  But, this means that God must "upgrade" our consciousness, so to speak, since currently we are unable to understand.

    Why does God have to wait before we go to heaven before we can fully understand?  Why are our brains made too inept to understand now?  God can and could have made it otherwise, but for some reason did not.  God also sends people to hell for infinite torture.  If God would have made our brains more advanced, so they were at least theoretically able to understand the mind of God, then that would drastically reduce the number of people going to hell, while still preserving free will.  What an absurd situation the christian God has created!

  2. profile image0
    brotheryochananposted 4 years ago

    Since you still believe in infinite torture I can see how you would stumble at the questions you want answered.
    God is in control but you have placed him as a 'ubiquitous problem solver' (inspite of what people choose to do with their bodies, ie, drugs, alcohol etc). What exactly is needed for God to be in control. Control of what? whether little johnny gets a boo boo or not? Car accidents end lives quickly but many have been salvaged, although damaged and many claim a miracle is what saved me. God is in control of the universe He created.
    Scientists have shown us that vibrations occur from everything. Everything oscillation which vibrate and has a frequency. So does voice. Voice is completely vibration and frequency, the very essence of its nature. Like the air. voice.  I find it interesting that Moses would have known such a thing to write, And God Said... also, It was convenient the way Shoemaker-Levy crashed into jupiter in 94. So God is in control of what else? Earth? Sure, God created earth but he did set up a very very efficient biological habitat, as fine tuned as it is, fits together and works together like a machine. Until man invented bulldozers.  We can choose what we want and this is how it should be. We should be able to determine between things and choose some thing; of our own accord, by our own choice(s) good or calamitous and God has to work with that. Bible says that God loves to be invited! He loves to have permission to work in every christians life! But He needs to be asked, persuaded possibly and allowed to work in the life. So we know that God works in the christian population to the extent that they allow Him.
    So what must God do for the UNsaved as to show He is in control. Well, since he likes to be invited and they are not inviting Him, God is doing nothing in that percentage. A few peoples lives, they claim, were miraculous. If we hear of Natural occurrances and Man-made disasters and those that do escape alive do we thank God that those survived and blame God that those other did not? Is that fair? Physics explains our planet; how it works, there's a name for what keeps us on the ground - gravity etc. In order for us to relate to our world we need constants. We need to know that we will hit the ground if we fall. Is God, like supposed to monitor the exact place of everyones feet, both saved and unsaved.
    Ill just leave it there.

  3. EinderDarkwolf profile image60
    EinderDarkwolfposted 4 years ago

    @Sooner28 - According to the Bible we can understand God. Eating of the tree of knowledge made us as God mentally. I would stop listening to what Christians Theology states, because well, it's theology, which means it's nothing but theory, not truth. I'm not saying the Bible is fact either, but it's where their theology is suppose to start.

    1. profile image0
      Sooner28posted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Interesting claim, and one I haven't heard before.  Could you elaborate on what you mean by "made us God mentally?"

      1. EinderDarkwolf profile image60
        EinderDarkwolfposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        In the creation myth from the bible Eve eats from the tree of knowledge. Now if you drop all the Dogma from the story, so you don't have the connotation that the Serpent is automatically Satan and there for evil, then you have find that you have  this creature telling Eve, right before she eats of the tree, that if she were to do so then she would possess the same knowledge as God.

  4. Jerami profile image78
    Jeramiposted 4 years ago

    Imagine yourself being 6 years old and in 1st grade. How could you enjoy learning to read and count, how could you enjoy playing in the playground, flirting with that other 1st grader of the oposit sex if you already had the mindset of a college graduate.
      We came here to this physical realm to experience experiences!!!   How can we do this if we already knew everything before the experiences began?
      Life wouldn't be much fun if we weren’t in the process of becoming. 
      When it is all over   we will then see the simplicity.

    1. profile image0
      Sooner28posted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Well, if my being required to believe something about that experience were necessary to avoid eternal torture, it might be wise to give me a better understanding of it once I reach my full maturity as a human being.

      1. Jerami profile image78
        Jeramiposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        "Well, "IF" my being required ..."   ....    sometimes we can find our answers within our own questions when we look hard enough.

        1. profile image0
          Sooner28posted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Well, if you don't believe in hell, the force of my point is drastically reduced, and my respect for your position has drastically increased, at least from where it was before.

          If God isn't going to burn me to death, then there is the problem of evil tied in with the inherent limits of the human mind.  The general defense of theism (without resorting to any Christian doctrine) on this question is that free will is more valuable than automatons.  But, what about the slow death of old age, as our cognitive faculties go, and even our ability to control our bowels?  Or, Lou Gehrig's diease, or Alzheimers, all of which could POTENTIALLY be cured if human beings had the capacity to fully understand the physical universe. 

          I am in agreement with you that puzzle solving is fun, like in the mario video games, trying to capture the stars and defeat bowser.  It's a great time to me!   So is thinking, and deciding where I stand on various issues. Unfortunately, my discovery of the stars and defeating bowser does not rest on people dying while I am looking for these discoveries.  Presumably, if God exists, he created us with a natural curiosity, but he could have created us otherwise and avoid all of this incredible suffering most people will eventually face.

          And, if you believe in some form of heaven, once we get there, there will be no more discoveries at all.  We will simply exist in the presence of God.  If that is bliss to you, why not achieve it sooner rather than later?

  5. EsmeSanBona profile image87
    EsmeSanBonaposted 4 years ago

    Why do people possessing complete certainty about a subject post questions about that for which they already have all the answers?

    Could it be for the same reason I posted the above question and for the same reason this statement has a question mark at the end of it?

    1. profile image0
      Sooner28posted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I'm not claiming to possess certainty.  The Christian is the one who does so, and gives me all of these strange justifications when certain questions are asked.  I am posing a question about the coherence of the defense that the human mind is too "finite" to fully understand the ways of God, and looking for a theistic response to the issue.

      If you are offering an answer or something to the discussion, I'm happy to read it.  If not, I don't see what your purpose of posting even is.

      1. EsmeSanBona profile image87
        EsmeSanBonaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        It is interesting that you have complete certainty that my post was directed at you.

        1. profile image0
          Sooner28posted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Perhaps because no one else posed a series of questions in their replies?

          1. EsmeSanBona profile image87
            EsmeSanBonaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Actually there are other questions, I looked carefully before posting.

            1. profile image0
              Sooner28posted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Just to keep it ambiguous huh tongue.  What do you think though?  Are you a Christian, and what is your position on the limits of human knowledge?

              1. EsmeSanBona profile image87
                EsmeSanBonaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                I am going to ask that you trust that when I ask the question I am about to ask, that I am asking sincerely and not to be snarky.

                Are you asking because you really want dialogue, or are you asking because you want to prove to me that my thoughts and beliefs--whatever they may or may not be are stupid and incorrect?

                1. profile image0
                  Sooner28posted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  Lol.  It's a good question and a fair one.  I am not always consistent in my responses.  Some people I just feel more charitable towards than others, and I can't really explain why. 

                  Anyway, I'm asking just because I am curious.  I promise you I'm not going to attack you or tell you that you are wrong.  If I violate that promise, it will be on this message for the hub pages community to see, and my reputation will be tarnished accordingly.

                  1. EsmeSanBona profile image87
                    EsmeSanBonaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    Fair enough.  And since you have shamed me with your honesty, I will confess to my deceptiveness.  Obviously, my original post was directed at you and obviously, I wrote what I did because I was already "certain" of the answer, and I obviously posted what I did to be irritating.  I apologize--not for the original post, because I meant what I posted--I get really irritated when I feel I'm being bated.  I love having discussions--actual dialogue, but I hate "discussions" that are actually Trojan horse diatribe.

                    Last question first, I don't have any answer on the extent of human knowledge as an absolute.  I only know the limits to my own knowledge which is limited to my interpretation of my life experiences.  Everything else falls into the category of belief. 

                    Before I answer the Christian question, I will answer a question you did not ask.  Yes, Virginia, I do believe there is a God.

                    Now for the Christian question.  I suppose the answer to that depends upon how you are defining "Christian."  If you are referring to people who seem to believe that slapping a bumper sticker on a car or voting in a certain manner or who claim to have seen the Hell Club guest list, then the answer is no.

  6. Jerami profile image78
    Jeramiposted 4 years ago

    As I get older is gets harder to find an answer to a question that I do not see the oposit of that answer having some validity.
    Is there a hell?    I don't think so!   But if there is a hell?  the fires of hell are contained within the spirit of man   for the evil which mankind inflicts upon mankind can not  properly be calculated.

    Is hell simply a figmant of mankinds imagination   OR is hell a product created by the evil which mankind inflicts upon others.

    A every single word coming out of our mouths continue on long after we have spoken them.
    Words of love to a child continues on long after the child has forgotten them.
    Words of hate likewise have a power of their own once spoken.

    If there is a hell ...  it is because we won't stop shoveling coal into it.

    1. profile image0
      Sooner28posted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I can agree with that broad conception of hell for sure.  War is hell; the internal workings of a psychopath are hell for the individual in question.  We can also create a society that is hell for many living within it. 

      I also completely agree that our words can have a very lingering influence on people long after we are gone.  The child will remember the harsh and kind words of the parent; the spouse will remember the fights; and, the friends will remember the quarrels.  Certain words are simply not erasable.  They forever change how we view the person who uttered them, rather it be in a positive or negative way.

      I can agree with that broad conception of hell for sure.  War is hell; the internal workings of a psychopath are hell for the individual in question.  We can also create a society that is hell for many living within it. 

      I also completely agree that our words can have a very lingering influence on people long after we are gone.  The child will remember the harsh and kind words of the parent; the spouse will remember the fights; and, the friends will remember the quarrels.  Certain words are simply not erasable.  They forever change how we view the person who uttered them, rather it be in a positive or negative way.

      I really wasn't trying to disagreeable with you at all.  I'm just more of a direct person when it comes to asking questions.  I don't think you are irrational for believing in God, because there are rational arguments for the existence of God.  I just happen to disagree with them.  I may part with my fellow atheists on this point, but there is a certain mystery to the universe that seems to defy human comprehension.  It seem as though as soon as one question is answered, one hundred more pop up in its place.

      What I find reprehensible is the very simple minded Christians who tell me if I don't say a 30 second prayer at some point before I physically die, I will roast without dying forever.  I don't think all religion is a bad thing at all; I am sometimes happy when someone holds a different viewpoint than me, because I agree with John Stuart Mill, when he said of a silenced opinion(by government coercion) in On Liberty, "if wrong, they lose what is almost as great a benefit, the clearer perception and livelier impression of truth produced by its collision with error." 

      Along with being of great rhetorical value, the point is strong.  When we engage in an actual debate with a person of an opposing viewpoint, they force us to be clear about our positions, our defenses of those positions, and our definitions of terms used.  I like to think opposition enhances our ability to critically think, rather than hindering it.  The honest religious, the ones who engage in the hard questions of evil, such as John Lennox, a theist mathematician, who I have great respect for, are very helpful in helping to bring greater understanding to the overall issue in question, and keeping the atheist on his/her toes when it comes to formulating objections and engaging with theistic answers to those objections.

  7. Jerami profile image78
    Jeramiposted 4 years ago

    Sooner28
    I've not been commenting in here much for quite some time because ..?    Well I guess I live in a Yea ..  But   world; I see both sides of the arguements  and don't know how to explain why I think one side of the arguement is right in many ways while also being wrong in many other ways.
        This also applies to the other side.

       I do believe in "GOD" though I can not agree with the religious interpretations of "exactly" who,and what God is.  And Atheists   ???  Well ...  because we theists can not accurately describe God , they profess that "IT" isn't.

    Kinda like  ....  (but not)   Imagine that we are in the dark woods (on the other side of no where)         I hear a noise!    You ask "what did it sound like? did you see it;  what did it look like?
      And I describe  the noise ... like a horse walking and stepping on a small limb. breaking it!   
    You rush out and catch a rabbit, and show me that it wasn't a horse, proving that I didn't hear anything!    ... ??????

    1. profile image0
      Sooner28posted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Defining God is terribly tricky because there is a chicken and an egg problem to the whole issue.  In order to know what God's attributes are, I need to have some external, objective source to find out.  Yet, how can I know which source is true and which is false without first presupposing that it's true?

    2. bBerean profile image60
      bBereanposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I have a growing collection of rabbits.  lol

      1. profile image0
        Sooner28posted 4 years ago in reply to this

        They do tend to reproduce rather quickly tongue.

      2. EsmeSanBona profile image87
        EsmeSanBonaposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Are they lionheads, because I really, really want one of those--but only if it's double-maned.

 
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