jump to last post 1-2 of 2 discussions (10 posts)

If Creationists want Creationism taught to "expand the curriculum"...

  1. Zelkiiro profile image83
    Zelkiiroposted 4 years ago

    Does that mean I also get to teach about Ancient Astronauts, Alien Overlords, the Expanding Earth, Scientology, and whatever those people who believe in lizard people prescribe to?

    Because that would be hilarious.

    1. wilderness profile image96
      wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Scientology is a religion - certainly it qualifies to be taught.  The rest are opinions, just as creationism is, without supporting evidence so perhaps they qualify as well.

      Will you also teach about Thor, Zeus and the rest of the gods?  And not as mythology, either, but as fact or at least acceptable theory?  In particular, will you teach the FSM as creator of all?

      1. Zelkiiro profile image83
        Zelkiiroposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        YESSSSSSSSSSSSSS.

        Someone forward this post to some backwards-ass school in Georgia, because I'm gonna be a science teacher!

    2. Bubblegum Senpai profile image87
      Bubblegum Senpaiposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Personally, we're getting "creationism" confused with particular teachings. Even Stephen Hawking, who had been a staunch Atheist during most of his time at Cambridge has moved to Agnosticism (which I mostly consider myself to be.)

      Quite frankly, I believe in evolution, but I'm not convinced as to how current science explains "origin of life." While science may yet provide an answer that appeases me one day, I believe that there is room under current factual models for intelligent design. Likewise, I'm not convinced there is an intelligent designer either, but based on actual facts than can be logically deduced, and not eliminated to mathematical probability (which is listed as 1/10^50) then it is entirely possible. I don't mind the teaching of "creationism" so long as it's not religious. If they do take the religion route, than by all means, teach about the titans birthing Zeus, and his sister-wife protruding from his forehead and the like, or maybe the sacred feminine. My favourite creation myths are the Shinto ones. I'd love to see that taught in class as valid theory in North America.

      Oh and it is possible to make this work. My Biology Class was really small, so in an effort to get the religious guys to get all their venting and comments out at the beginning, my science teacher spent the first day on evolution by dividing the class in two and having them debate the merits of evolution vs creation (which are actually not in conflict, origin of life is the conflict - not evolution). The thing is - she decided who was on what side, so some atheists had to defend creationism, while some Christians and Muslims had to defend evolution. It was actually pretty fun.

      1. wilderness profile image96
        wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        That would be fun, as well as a terrific mind stretcher and an introduction to the vagaries of debate.  Not only will you learn that the "other side" has points to make, but you will also learn to leave out valid points in your own debate and, more importantly, to look for such things from your debate opponent.

    3. autumn18 profile image70
      autumn18posted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Probably not. I'd say they can go ahead and teach creationism if it's presented as what it is, a creation myth story. It doesn't belong with science.

  2. MelissaBarrett profile image60
    MelissaBarrettposted 4 years ago

    Personally, I vote for the religious explanation of Atum... who basically masturbated mankind into existance.

    I'll be youtubing that classroom lecture btw.

    1. wilderness profile image96
      wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      For the first time I think I'm glad I will no longer be found learning in a school.  I've always enjoyed learning, but Atum, well....

      1. MelissaBarrett profile image60
        MelissaBarrettposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        One of my children did the "How do you think we got here, Mom?" thing with me.  I told him that I wasn't there (contrary to popular belief) and I wasn't sure.  I told him to go find a theory he liked and run with it... 500 words or more.

        And thus I learned about Atum... and several other pretty odd ones too.

        1. wilderness profile image96
          wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          I see.  Well, it seems as good as any other.  "From the mouths of babes", you know.

 
working