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A generous game to play

  1. Paraglider profile image90
    Paragliderposted 8 years ago

    Let's see if we can run with this. Please post on this thread all that is best (in your eyes) about a religion or philosophy other than your own.

    For example, I am a Rationalist, but from the (Hindu) Bhagavad Gita I have learned and tried to adopt the ideas of non-attachment to the outcome of my actions and to the material world.

    From Buddhism, or at least from reading the story of Siddhartha Guatama, I became far more comfortable with death as just another part of our humanity and not something to fear.

    From Christianity, there is the injunction to love your neighbour as youself, which I try (and fail) to do, and also, in the Sermon on the Mount, a pervasive message against self agrandisement and acquisitiveness.

    How about you?

    1. mohitmisra profile image60
      mohitmisraposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      This is a very sweet gesture from you.
      I learned that love or God is the basic foundation of every religion. smile

      1. Paraglider profile image90
        Paragliderposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        Hi Mohit - just checking that you really meant to type 'love or God' and not 'love of God'?

        1. mohitmisra profile image60
          mohitmisraposted 8 years ago in reply to this

          Love or God. smile

    2. profile image0
      sandra rinckposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      I am not any one religion but this is what I learned.

      From reading and discussions with other Buddhist, I learned that with life comes suffering so don't take it personally, it's just the way it is.  I also learned they cannot agree with each other but that it isn't good to intentionally inflict suffering on other people.  Just do the best you can.

      From Hindu (sorry countrywomen if I get my terms wrong) I learned that what you put out is what you get back in the next life. Karma, and that karma can come in mysterious ways.  Like a question I asked CW once about why when I did something bad, something good came of it and she said, (in more words than this) you don't always know that because something looks bad, that it was... just do the best you can.

      From Christianity I learned that people aren't supposed to hurt each other but love each other and if there is something that you want justice for, then just wait and let God sort it out. Until then, do the best you can.

      From Islam I learned it's not right to trespass on the things that people hold dearest to their hearts. In other words, if you leave me alone, I will leave you alone. deal? Do the best you can.

      From Native American, that the spirit is always around us and speaks in many different ways if you just open up your ears to listen.  The path isn't always clear but learn and of course, do the best you can.

      From Atheist I learned that you should be self reliant.

      From the Allegory of the Cave, I think it was by Socrates, that you shouldn't be afraid to explore, that if you never dare to do anything then you waste away in a cave never having seen that there is more.

      From Machiavelli in the Prince, I learned that vengeance is a bitch and that sometimes the most loving people are scorned to anger.

      From Shakespeare, I learned that humor is a delightful tool and that even dark humor has a series of good lessons in them. 

      From Einstein I learned that life cannot be summed up in one simple theory and that while some things never change, one that should is what people do to each other because when you see the whole picture, it's really not worth fighting about.

      But mostly through religion, science, and philosophies, I learned that no one knows anything.

  2. Paraglider profile image90
    Paragliderposted 8 years ago

    Thanks - it gives a whole different meaning smile

    1. mohitmisra profile image60
      mohitmisraposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Welcome and its not only a sweet gesture but a noble one as well- hats of to you.smile

  3. quicksand profile image83
    quicksandposted 8 years ago

    Phew! At last a forum safe enough for believers, hosted by a non-believer, with no threat of anyone with a modest temper upgrading! smile

    At last a forum where we all can tread without fear! Mark my words, people from far and near! A forum where believer and non believer can meet and greet!!! Whew! What a relief!

    smile smile smile

    1. Paraglider profile image90
      Paragliderposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      So, Mr Quicksand, are you going to join the discussion or just admire the wallpaper wink

      1. quicksand profile image83
        quicksandposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        Yes Sir! You've got some smashing wall paper! Cool!

    2. Eric Graudins profile image60
      Eric Graudinsposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Don't be lulled into a false sense of security. This is just a momentary break in normal proceedings. (They must all be getting their smiting gear retempered - or something :-)

      I better get out of here quick before they notice me.

      1. Sufidreamer profile image80
        Sufidreamerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        lol

        We should have a sweepstake about when normal service is resumed.

        I stake one bottle of finest Ouzo on Page 4. smile

        1. Mark Knowles profile image61
          Mark Knowlesposted 8 years ago in reply to this

          I see your Ouzo and raise you a bottle of Jack Daniels on page 3 smile

          And I promise not to be the one who breaks the peace. In the meantime, I am a big fan of the Hindu ideal of non attachment which fits with my own studies. smile

          1. Eric Graudins profile image60
            Eric Graudinsposted 8 years ago in reply to this

            Mark Knowles publicly displaying restraint. This I GOTTA see!  lol

          2. BDazzler profile image83
            BDazzlerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

            Proof of God if ever there was one!  ... (Sorry couldn't resist...) OK, Seriously ... Something good about Mark's brand of rationalism : I truly do admire his relentless pursuit of truth and goodness as he understands it the best he can ... which often results in  his rejection of nearly any "packaged" philosophy regardless of where it comes from.

        2. Paraglider profile image90
          Paragliderposted 8 years ago in reply to this

          Well, so far so good smile  My theory behind this thread is that you don't have to believe a religion or philosophy in order to value at least some parts of it. The same is true in pure science - Newtonian Mechanics is still pretty handy even though, strictly, it is 'wrong'. (And there are plenty of adjacent threads where people so inclined can beat each other up).

          1. Sufidreamer profile image80
            Sufidreamerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

            Great stuff - Thanks for starting the great thread, Paraglider.

            I have never heard MK or yourself slate Jesus/Buddha/Guru Nanth/Muhammed. Whether you believe in God or not, most of what they teach is good. It is when things are twisted that religion becomes nasty.

            Although a baptised Christian, I like the way that Sufis/Quakers avoid doctrine, dogma and clergy. They just get in the way. Might not be for everyone, but it suits me just fine! smile

            Paraglider - Take your heretical Einsteinian theories out of here. Newton wrote in Latin, so he must have been right. Darn new-fangled Relativity - does that make my Pick-Up work? Sheesh

      2. quicksand profile image83
        quicksandposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        Mark my works mate, have no fear
        Mr Paraglider is near

        He will protect you from the worst
        All because he is the host

        I assure you it is safe to stay
        so please don't go away

        smile smile smile

  4. Sufidreamer profile image80
    Sufidreamerposted 8 years ago

    Good Call, Paraglider. A very good game!

    Not sure where to start, as I am a bit of a Magpie when it comes to religion and life smile

    I am Greek Orthodox Christian but:

    Surprisingly enough, I like a lot of what Sufism has to say - I like their disrespect for dogma and organized religion. I have never been one for going to church or spending time poring through scripture. Most scripture boils down to one simple phrase - 'Be kind to people.'

    The Quaker principle that the spiritual journey is an individual pursuit - Everybody must develop their own beliefs, rather than following man-made 'rules.'

    Somewhere along the line, I picked up the Buddhist/Hindu/Jain respect for all life. I turned veggie partly because of reading about Indian beliefs, partly through my Grandfather's influence.

    From the Icelandic Eddas - A Code of Honour. Not to lie, cheat or steal. Not to impose my beliefs upon others.

    And, of course: From science - Evolution wink


    EDIT~ Quicksand lol

    1. mohitmisra profile image60
      mohitmisraposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      In Indian or Hinduism which is very broad belief (people living of the land of the river Indus)  many eat non veg food.Hunting and fishing- having such a huge coast line  is a way of life for many.I love what Guru Nanak has to say" Who is to tell what is veg and what is non -veg,everything is alive it is the fool who argues on the merit of religion". smile

      1. Sufidreamer profile image80
        Sufidreamerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        lol - My knowledge of Eastern religions is not as broad or as deep as it should be! It was based around a few pieces that I read as a teenager.

        Just reading a book about Sikhism - I have read about the history of the Gurus, and am about to start on the doctrine. Got to love the acceptance of all beliefs smile

        I promised Country Women that I would read about Hinduism next! smile

        PG - Fascinating stuff. Hope that you liked what you read! smile

        I tend to sniff around the mystical fringes of organised religion - that is where the interesting stuff is! Only met a couple of Sufis, but I plan to visit Jordan and Iran at some point.

        1. mohitmisra profile image60
          mohitmisraposted 8 years ago in reply to this

          You will love reading about the Sikh saints ,my favorite is Guru Nanak the founder one of my idols.
          Got to love the acceptance of all beliefs- shows your intelligence- keep it up.

          Sufism- Jalal ud-din Rumi is also another idol of mine. smile

          1. Sufidreamer profile image80
            Sufidreamerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

            Thanks, Mohit - I have so little time to read, but I am slowly working my way through Eastern wisdom.

            Don't know if you have read much about the Quakers, but some of their beliefs have a lot of merit. I am from a town with a strong Quaker tradition, so I was brought up with a few of their ideas.

            http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions … rs_1.shtml is a good start!

            1. mohitmisra profile image60
              mohitmisraposted 8 years ago in reply to this

              Thank you for the link will read about them smile

              1. mohitmisra profile image60
                mohitmisraposted 8 years ago in reply to this

                Very nice philosophy- very similar to Hinduism.Broad minded philosophy.
                # God is love
                # the light of God is in every single person
                # a person who lets their life be guided by that light will achieve a full relationship with God
                # everyone can have a direct, personal relationship with God without involving a priest or minister
                # redemption and the Kingdom of Heaven are to be experienced now, in this world.

                1. mohitmisra profile image60
                  mohitmisraposted 8 years ago in reply to this

                  Paraglider this is what I meant.You will see this essence in all religions.

                  I learned that love or God is the basic foundation of every religion. smile

                  1. Paraglider profile image90
                    Paragliderposted 8 years ago in reply to this

                    Mohit, Sufi - I know a little bit about Quakers. You know how we all have these 'Aunts' who are just close friends and not really family? One of mine, Aunt Kathy, was a Quaker, and not just any Quaker, but a Cadbury. Yes, the HUGE chocolate manufacturer! Cadbury and Fry (same family) were children of the Industrial Revolution. But they were also Quaker. And their religion made them truly philanthropic. They built not just a chocolate factory but a small town with simple but quality accommodation for all their workers. And amenities like cinema, shops, cafes, etc. Because they believed that profit was ok but excessive profit was wrong and should be given back to the workers in better living conditions. Not bad, eh?

                    And Aunt Kathy continued in this spirit of generosity by giving us (2 brothers & me) a Cadbury's variety box every Christmas.

                    So Quakers are OK wink

        2. countrywomen profile image60
          countrywomenposted 8 years ago in reply to this

          Sufi- You do make me want to post(also since maybe you wanted some female inputs here I am or was this a male bonding campfire where I am not allowed)...hehe wink Btw it is good to know that you still remember your promise. Yes what Mohit says is true. And even when the kings used to hunt it was primarily prescribed for consumption. We have to first take care of our own body and in that process whatever least harm can be done to our environment is prescribed.

          Paraglider- Now coming to your question:
          From the Jains- I love there absolute belief in non violence (they even cover there mouths so that no minute creatures go inside them).
          From the Budhists- There belief in the eight fold path seems to be a practical guidelines to evolve from the cause/suffering cycle.
          From the Christians- There helping attitude and the ability to go to remote parts to serve the poor and downtrodden.
          From the Muslims- There loyalty to something they strongly believe in.
          From the Sikhs- There community service (langar) where actions mean more than words.
          From the Zorastrians- Being truthful and trying to increase the positive energy(and reducing the negative energy) in us by rightful means.
          From the Rationalists- Trying to be constantly enquiring about the cause/effect of everything based on logical/cognitive thinking & scientific methodologies.
          From the Agnostics-  Leaving the questions about God as open ended questions instead of trying to come to a definite conclusion one way or the other (sometimes questions are more important than being able to come to the "right" answers)
          From the Atheists: A belief that a "action/deed" is far more effective than a prayer(although others who do believe in prayers may consider it as a subtle action).

          These are some of my experiences/observations(based on both online and in person). I haven't met many Jews/Bahai and so many others yet to have an impression of them as of now. smile

          1. livelonger profile image88
            livelongerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

            Great list. Something I read in a magazine I subscribe to (Free Inquiry) from Johan Galtung:

               1. Judaism—truth is not a declaration of faith but a process, a dialogue with no end;
               2. Protestant Christianity—emphasizes the significance of individual conscience and responsibility;
               3. Catholic Christianity—distinguishes between sin and the sinners, being against the sin but forgiving the sinner;
               4. Orthodox Christianity—possesses the optimism of Sunday Christianity as opposed to the necrophilic Friday Christianities of the other two;
               5. Islam, Sura 8:61—when the Other shows an inclination toward peace, so do you; peace breeds peace and zakat, the sharing with the poor;
               6. Hinduism—the view of history as ongoing creation, preservation, and destruction;
               7. Buddhism/Jainism—nonviolence, ahimsa, and engi, that it all hangs together, causation is codependent, no beginning, no end; nobody is totally guilty or innocent; we all share responsibility in reducing dukkha (sorrow, suffering) and increasing sukha (fulfillment, liberation) for us all;
               8. Confucianism—the harmony of harmonies, inside ourselves, in the family, at school, at work, in society, the country, the nation, the region, and the civilization, with all levels inspiring each other;
               9. Daoism—yin-yang, that there is good in the bad and bad in the good, and bad in the good in the bad and good in the bad in the good, and we have to navigate ethically through all of that;
              10. Finally, humanism—the idea of basic human needs, reflected in basic human rights as a general guideline for human action in general and political/economic action in particular. Such wisdom will survive long after God and Satan die.

            1. countrywomen profile image60
              countrywomenposted 8 years ago in reply to this

              LiveLonger- WOW!! That is an excellent summary of so many beliefs in a nutshell. Btw did you get to meet folks from all these beliefs (either online or in person)? It is such a educational experience when we learn so much from different view points. Thanks to Paraglider for starting this thread. smile

              1. Lady Guinevere profile image60
                Lady Guinevereposted 8 years ago in reply to this

                Yes, hear, hear to Paraglider!  I love the internet in so many ways and getting to know others from around the globe!  The next stage would be meeting others from around the Universe!!!  Interesting eh?

  5. Paraglider profile image90
    Paragliderposted 8 years ago

    Sufi-Dreamer - I had to google Sufism to find out more about it. It's one of the terms I've heard floating about but never had reason to explore. Now, on reading that source of all knowledge, Wikipedia, on the subject, I realise that I have met a few Sufi adherents in my travels in the Middle East. So I've learned something today smile

  6. profile image0
    pgrundyposted 8 years ago

    From the Tibetan Buddhist school founded by Chogyam Trungpa in the 1970s and popularized today in the writings of American Buddhist nun Pema Chodron I learned that the most toxic situations in life can be welcomed and transformed through acceptance, detached observation of what is actually happening (as opposed to rabid thinking about what I WISH was happening and editing reality to fit that), and the cultivation of compassion. This was an enormously useful lesson for me coming out of a personal situation that was tragic and ugly. The tradition teaches that such situations can be used to generate compassion for ourselves and others and therefore should not be avoided or discarded. It teaches people to accept and use every part of life and every emotion, not just the 'good' parts and the 'good' emotions.

    Great thread! big_smile

    1. Paraglider profile image90
      Paragliderposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Interesting take. It sounds not dissimilar to Hindu non-attachment (or my understanding of it). By the way, do you think it is necessary to have a teacher in such areas, or do you think you can learn as much with time, thought and a well written book?

  7. Lady Guinevere profile image60
    Lady Guinevereposted 8 years ago

    I have learned alot from the Buddist about love and such things.  I have learned of the loyalty of Catholics and many other religious/belief structures including Druids and Wiccan.  They all have the same goals in mind---love one another.  Some may go to the extrememes and then there is just one thing I have to say about that-----------Everything in Moderation.

    There is an excellent ste that explains all religions and beleif structures. It is Religious Tolerance.org.

    http://www.religioustolerance.org/

  8. BDazzler profile image83
    BDazzlerposted 8 years ago

    I find the spirtiual depth and complexity of Zoroastrianism to be facinating as it seems to have a solid grasp of certain fundamental truths.

    1. Sufidreamer profile image80
      Sufidreamerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Morning, BDazzler smile

      One of the many reasons for wanting to visit Iran (the ancient history, too!).

      MK is reactive - if people don't tell him that is going to the special level of Hell reserved just for Atheists, somewhere below lawyers, real estate agents and Wall St. bankers, he is very respectful of the beliefs of others! smile

      1. BDazzler profile image83
        BDazzlerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        LOL ... if you can, go back and read our first debate ... Of course, I was standing up for AEvans who is so similar to my sister in so many ways it's uncanny,  So, I was not exactly diplomatic sometimes big_smile

        1. Sufidreamer profile image80
          Sufidreamerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

          I read that one - easily done. I remember going all medieval on a couple of Creationists in an evolution debate. I was out of order, so I try to be a little more restrained and understanding. No use complaining about others forcing their beliefs if I do just the same.

          Whilst I am borderline scripturephobic, I like the way that you constantly question your own beliefs. I have respect for the way that you strive to make your own interpretations, rather than regurgitate the findings of others. Different path, same destination smile

          This is getting worrying now - no arguments on the thread. Maybe the Interdimensional Timewarp has struck again, and I am in an alternate universe hmm

          1. BDazzler profile image83
            BDazzlerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

            Scripture is often called "a sword" if as a cub scout I was taught to respect and use a pocket knife properly, how much more a sword.... Too many people swing it at others to justify themselves,  ...  the purpose of taking the log out of your own eye, to get the sawdust out of your friend's is to save his eye, not to collect sawdust.

            Sometimes, I fear, I have been quite proud of my sawdust collection.

            1. Sufidreamer profile image80
              Sufidreamerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

              lol - A distinct lack of female input on this thread. It is turning into a sit round the campfire male-bonding session! Tomorrow the paintballing smile

              Seriously, though - replace scripture with 'science', and pretty much the same here.

              As long as we understand that we make mistakes, then there is no problem. I seem to remember you saying that your interpretation of 'born with sin' means 'nobody is perfect.' Pretty good definition - I am with Paraglider on the subject of sin, but I sure mess things up a lot of the time!

              This thread rumbles on - I reckon that we are all travelling in pretty much the same direction, but choose different cars - although I could imagine MK on an old Triumph motorcycle wink

              1. BDazzler profile image83
                BDazzlerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

                You read my "The Greatest Sin" Hub, right?

    2. mohitmisra profile image60
      mohitmisraposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Good words,good thoughts and good dead's in the foundation of the Parsi philosophy.
      I am half Parsi and they don't believe  its food without meat but that doesn't make them any less spiritual.They are known for their honesty.       smile

      1. BDazzler profile image83
        BDazzlerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        Most traditions have it that the Wise Men in Matthew's gospel were Zorastrian astrologers.  There is a deeper connection between Zoroastrianism  and Christianity than many Christians understand.  I'm a carnivore myself ... one more point for the Z-Men!

        1. mohitmisra profile image60
          mohitmisraposted 8 years ago in reply to this

          The light connects smile

        2. Paraglider profile image90
          Paragliderposted 8 years ago in reply to this

          Do you know much about the link between the Zoroastran and Masonic traditions? Hinted at in Mozart's Magic Flute, but no full explanation there!

          1. mohitmisra profile image60
            mohitmisraposted 8 years ago in reply to this

            There is a story that the Masons were founded on the teachings of Zaratushtra.Today in India you will find many Masons are Parsis.I joined for some time but never attended.

            Out of fear of being prosecuted by the church they held secret meetings as it was blasphemous to praise or accept any other Prophet than Jesus in Europe. smile

          2. BDazzler profile image83
            BDazzlerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

            I don't ... wonderful thing about "Secret Societies" is that they're secret big_smile

            1. Mark Knowles profile image61
              Mark Knowlesposted 8 years ago in reply to this

              What secret societies? sad

              1. countrywomen profile image60
                countrywomenposted 8 years ago in reply to this

                I think they were talking about "Masons" smile

                1. Mark Knowles profile image61
                  Mark Knowlesposted 8 years ago in reply to this

                  'Twas a joke. smile

                  1. countrywomen profile image60
                    countrywomenposted 8 years ago in reply to this

                    So dumb of me. Yes you are right if we know those secret societies then they aren't "secret" anymore (except for their internal operations) big_smile

  9. quicksand profile image83
    quicksandposted 8 years ago

    Sufism cannot be learnt, and cannot be taught either. Understanding is too weak a word to use in this context. To absorb this knowledge, the receiver's five senses have to be reconstructed to accommodate this "knowledge." Expanding the capacity of the senses is the initial stage which relies on the standard of the "teacher."

    The "ism" of the Sufis, some believe existed for many centuries. "Understanding" what? The point of "understanding" is a package which includes the source of everything. From that point no further questions need be asked.

    1. Sufidreamer profile image80
      Sufidreamerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Yup - Pretty much the same with the mystical elements of most religions. smile

      That is what makes the fringes interesting!

      1. quicksand profile image83
        quicksandposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        It is just my opinion there is nothing mystical about the scene here. Scientific explanation is possible. Some of the sciences that are still in the infancy stage will one day emerge enabling many benefits.

        1. Paraglider profile image90
          Paragliderposted 8 years ago in reply to this

          One of the benefits is that we can have this discussion, in real time, around the world. Science ain't so bad wink

          1. quicksand profile image83
            quicksandposted 8 years ago in reply to this

            You see, the science of the mind has not made any giant leaps from the time of Pavlov and Freud. Just small steps. (Sorry Neil). I have reason to believe the intricate workings of the mind can not be revealed in full by psychology alone.

            This is because unlike in the real sciences in which quantities can be digitally measured for the purposes of evaluating and predicting, where the changes in the measured quantities are observed for inference.

            This sort of thing delivers a high degree of accuracy, whereas in the science of the mind, I would say, although I cite a weak example, you cannot "measure" schizophrenia. Like measuring the temperature, heartbeat etc.

            You can only say this guy is stark mad, raving mad and so on. There is not yet any provision to say that a patient has so many units of schizophrenia. Making inroads in psychology towards "measuring" these things digitally will require merging with the other sciences.

            When that occurs I truly believe, we, at last will have openings to understanding the real nature of things.

            The mind alone can achieve this, without any science to provide support. A story I recall, although I do not remember the source, supports what I have just said.

            It is about scientists having reached a stage in science from which point there is just one step to make in order to unlock all the secrets of nature. More work has to be done. Having accomplished all this, with time, they nervously take that small step upwards to the "rooftop" which is going to be in reality one real giant leap. (sorry again, Neil, I just cant help quoting you, probably because I wrote a hub on that voyage of yours!)

            When they finally make that giant leap and arrive on that "rooftop" they find a yogi seated there doing a breathing exercise known as "Pranayama."

            They asked him how he got there, when he got there ... He replies "I didn't come here." "I was here." "I have been here right throughout."
            ... ... ...

            This is straight from my memory and so, there may be errors. If so, my apologies to source and all concerned.

            Where these things are concerned the Sufis need be checked out "in full."

            1. Paraglider profile image90
              Paragliderposted 8 years ago in reply to this

              I agree with you, QS, at least in theory. But I am not convinced it will ever be possible to obtain all the data that would be needed to map and analyse what is happening in the brain. Certainly not by invasive surgery, so it could only ever be through some highly sophisticated scan technique. You're talking (I think) about reducing the life sciences to physical sciences by sheer brute force of data crunching. It's a bit like describing Microsoft Office in machine code (only more so). Theoretically possible, but no picnic!

              1. Sufidreamer profile image80
                Sufidreamerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

                If chaos is involved, even more so - we cannot predict the weather, and the human brain is far more complex. Must admit, I do like keeping abreast of what the physics folks are up to - they are finding out some amazing stuff. Sadly, I have a healthy fear of equations, so can only follow the gist.

              2. quicksand profile image83
                quicksandposted 8 years ago in reply to this

                Paraglider, there was an article in the Readers' Digest many years ago about an experiment performed by means of which scientists proved that memory is actually the result of a chemical reaction. (I've written a hub on this one as well.)

                I was not suggesting surgery which requires physical contact. However, magnetic induction ... somewhere in the seventies the Germans were performing some experiments with the target being to induce the state of Nirvan. One of the tools used was computer generated "music."

                You would probably have heard of this.

  10. BDazzler profile image83
    BDazzlerposted 8 years ago

    We're on page 3, Where's the Jack Daniels, Mark?

    1. Mark Knowles profile image61
      Mark Knowlesposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      When we meet in person - you can count on it. Where I live - it is insanely expensive. Plus shipping smile

      1. BDazzler profile image83
        BDazzlerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        PM me the next time you come to vist New Orleans.  We'll smoke cigars, drink Jack and generally have a great time.

        1. Mark Knowles profile image61
          Mark Knowlesposted 8 years ago in reply to this

          Count on it. I had an excellent time last visit. I'll bring my gun just in case big_smile

          1. BDazzler profile image83
            BDazzlerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

            lol

  11. Paraglider profile image90
    Paragliderposted 8 years ago

    My time zone insists I go to bed now. thanks all for entering into the spirit of this one, and see you all in the (Gulf) morning  smile

  12. Paraglider profile image90
    Paragliderposted 8 years ago

    Good morning all smile
    So far, no-one has mentioned the Rastafarians:
    Everything's gonna be all right...
    (whether or not Haile Selassie was a reincarnation of God)
    Ganja peace, man wink

    1. mohitmisra profile image60
      mohitmisraposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Ha- they are similar to Hinduism.They smoke for divine reasons in order to communicate with God. The Egyptians also believed smoke was the passage from this world to the other- basically you concentrate on your breath.
      The sage say it slows down your breath and your thoughts -a stepping stone for meditation.

      1. Paraglider profile image90
        Paragliderposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        They also reject globalisation and the corporate culture and focus on a simpler more eco-friendly lifestyle incorporating a lot of African tradition. The current failure of global/corporate should encourage more of us to look to their example.

        1. mohitmisra profile image60
          mohitmisraposted 8 years ago in reply to this

          Nice- every master says simplify. smile

          1. countrywomen profile image60
            countrywomenposted 8 years ago in reply to this

            Mohit- Even you are a "master" in your own way. When you mentioned "love" or "God" as the essence that really touched my heart. Love certainly is the basis. Btw I didn't know you were half parsee (If my experience in bombay is correct than to be a parsee one has to have both the parents as parsee's I am not sure if there is something like half parsee among parsee's?).
            But yes parsee's are very hardworking, honest and truthful folks (but there surnames which start with there professions can be funny to non parsees like Daruwala (Daru=alcohol) etc) big_smile

            Paraglider- Nice catch. How could we miss that? Bob Marley was one of the most popular Rastafarians. They are mostly vegans and avoid alcohol too. Thanks for such a wonderful thread. smile

            1. mohitmisra profile image60
              mohitmisraposted 8 years ago in reply to this

              Technically you are correct.My mother was Parsi -got excommunicated when she married a Hindu.
              Then its in my blood and this debate is being fought till today.Related to the Parsi Agyari in Grant Road- Grandfather was a priest-Parsi side.
              And thank you for your kindness- I do know who I am. smile

            2. Paraglider profile image90
              Paragliderposted 8 years ago in reply to this

              Yes, the late great Bob Marley was a great ambassador for the Rastas. Some of his lyrics run very deep. He's very popular with the Gulf Arabs, though I'm mot sure of the connection.

              1. countrywomen profile image60
                countrywomenposted 8 years ago in reply to this

                Actually his lyrics are pretty meaningful and I don't find it surprising that lots of folks like it. I guess there are folks who like the lyrics and others who like the music more. But the best combination would be to have both. Although some of the instrumental music are by themselves in a separate class(my husband loves instrumental) smile

                1. Make  Money profile image73
                  Make Moneyposted 8 years ago in reply to this

                  I used to have a  Rastaman friend when I was in my teens.  At least I think he was.  He was one of about 5 blacks back then that lived in the town I live in.  Sully used to say "it's real cool down in Jamaica man" with his thick Jamaican accent. smile  He sang in a reggae band and recorded his own music.  One day he got a call from Jamaica saying one of his songs made it to the Jamaica top hits, so he was off back to Jamaica.  That was back before Bob Marley died so I imagine he did alright.

                  PG Haile Selassie was from Ethiopia so maybe that's why Bob Marley is very popular with the Gulf Arabs.  Haile Selassie is revered as the religious symbol for God incarnate among the Rastafarians.  Good music too.

  13. aka-dj profile image79
    aka-djposted 8 years ago

    I Can't say I have learne an awful lot "from" other religions, but I have learned a fair bit "about" them. My real learning is actually right here on the religion forum. I mostly enjoy (really) interacting with others of other beliefs. I have no problem hearing their points of view, and do love them as people. I have said it to you before PG, I love the way you write and express your thoughts etc. I am having a great time! big_smile:

  14. Paraglider profile image90
    Paragliderposted 8 years ago

    aka-dj - thanks for dropping by smile  The religion forum is a mixed 'church' indeed, but quite a lively one!

    Mohit - quite a few Church of Scotland communicants are also Freemasons (and/or policemen!) but secrecy is still part of the masonic culture, so it is hard to know quite what they are about, even now.

    1. mohitmisra profile image60
      mohitmisraposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      But they have opened up to the public roughly a year back, may be two .

  15. Paraglider profile image90
    Paragliderposted 8 years ago

    Yes. And even if we were able to grab the total data flow in the brain, we'd still have to translate it back up the ladder of abstraction - The patient is cold. We grab 17 TeraBytes of data over 12 seconds. We analyse it in a vast transputer for six hours. Final print-out - "I'm cold". No mention of brass monkeys. That comes in version 3.7 ...

    1. countrywomen profile image60
      countrywomenposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      WOW!! That is a typical software phrase. Any problems or any enhancements just wait for the new patch/version release lol

    2. Sufidreamer profile image80
      Sufidreamerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      lol

      Have a sneaking feeling that, with current technology, that would require a computer significantly larger than the Earth. Possibly even larger than Jeremy Clarkson's ego.

  16. SparklingJewel profile image64
    SparklingJewelposted 8 years ago

    What I like best about all the religions is that they all are saying the same things, just in different words based in different cultural surroundings. The mystical teachings of the religions are much more "full" of meaning than doctrine/dogma.

    I am waiting for spiritual science to be more accepted; science and religion/spiritual paralleled. I find them quantifiable  and measurable...just not in the "accepted" terms of science. big_smile

    Like chakras and meridian energies being accepted as truth and another valid aspect of being that affects our health and state of mind.
    For every scripture I have read in the worlds religions have talked about them, but most people have not made those connections yet with day to day life. My whole life I have lived with "these energies" and it has taken a lot of doing  for me to feel accepted as an individual, when these "realities" of life are not recognized and accepted as realities.

    And then of course there is the soul and the validity of that as an important aspect of being. Jung was quite adamant on it.

    And Astrology as a spiritual science, actually paralleling, even defining psychology, when looked at as a higher state of consciousness, not mundanely as in the simple newspaper daily blurb.

    I am grateful for the aspects of 'East meets West'  that have been brought forth and accepted by at least some people. This is an exciting time ! big_smile

    1. Sufidreamer profile image80
      Sufidreamerposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      I like that, SparklingJewel - not in the "accepted" terms of science. That is a perfectly fair statement. I have a much more liberal definition of science than Paraglider, but even for me astrology is not a science. On the other hand, does it have to be?

      That is not the same as saying that it is wrong or useless - . History, theology, literature and many of the spiritual pursuits require skill, interpretation, wisdom and intuition. They are not strictly science, but are an essential part of human knowledge.

      The problem is that many of the charlatans try to find validity for their craft by trying to use pseudo-scientific jargon - the true masters just smile to themselves and carry on studying. Most of the dedicated astrologers that I know hate the parasitic element more than anybody - they give everybody a bad name.

  17. SparklingJewel profile image64
    SparklingJewelposted 8 years ago

    when I was a framing carpenter, we had several Rasta guys on our crew...we were jammin' while walking the rafters on "high"...in the "good ole days" of my youth, "don't worry, be happy"...full of love and peace and Rasta and the Grateful Dead.........big_smile

  18. Make  Money profile image73
    Make Moneyposted 8 years ago

    SparklingJewel walking the rafters on high with a Rastaman carpentry crew.  That's quite the image.  Cool. smile

  19. shibashake profile image84
    shibashakeposted 8 years ago

    From my dad who is agnostic, I learned that I should always consider what makes me happy, and just go for that. And no matter what I choose, he will be there to support me.

    From my mom, who is Christian, I learned that I can’t please everyone, so I should just do what I think is right.

    From my grandma, who was Taoist, I learned to respect my elders, and also not to sleep with my feet pointing at the door.

    From my dogs (one is Catholic, I think, and the other is agnostic) I learned not to take things too seriously, and that fresh chicken is always better than kibble.

    From the Dalai Lama I learned that you lead a happier life by listening and trying to put yourself in other people’s shoes. Negative energy + negative energy = more negative energy 

    From  Genzo Sanzo, who is a monk character in a story, I learned that  you should find your own path and not be defined by what others think you should be.

    From Paraglider, I learned that many people with different backgrounds and different belief systems can come together, discuss wallpaper, and sometimes even agree. We should try curtains next.

    I am not sure if this is the best, but it is what has stuck with me most. smile

    1. countrywomen profile image60
      countrywomenposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Shibashake- You do learn from lots of sources. Just curious how did you figure out your dog's beliefs? smile

      1. shibashake profile image84
        shibashakeposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        I pay close attention to which religious books are well licked, and which religious books make them so angry, they tear out all the pages.

        When that fails, I try to figure out their beliefs based on their actions and temperament. big_smile

  20. dranjesh profile image54
    dranjeshposted 8 years ago

    Dear Paraglider, Fantastic learning attitude is found on this track smile

    All those who have mentioned their learnings, I appreciate and wish all of us take from this treasure what we miss smile

    We talk about personality -
    what I have learnt from my experiences is - 
    Personality = person + qualities

    We should not just be literates but should be educated to use the literacy.

    Thus a person is incomplete even though he has qualities (only awareness of qualities can be considered as literacy). Hence for him to be complete, he should be educated to utilise and express his qualities with an attitude of humbleness and gratitude smile which can be = Ideal personality.

    Learning is complete only when we have implemented and experienced what information we have compiled. Hence we should always have a practical (learning) attitude instead of just keep on collecting information.

    Wish all a good luck smile

 
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