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Worms have free will

  1. janesix profile image60
    janesixposted 2 years ago

    What is free will? Is it the ability to make choices? Is it the ability to make choices that can go against instinct? Do animals have different levels of free will, depending on how much they are able to go against instinct? Do plants have free will? Do you have to have a brain to have free will (or a will at all?)

    "Even worms have free will. If offered a delicious smell, for example, a roundworm will usually stop its wandering to investigate the source, but sometimes it won't. Just as with humans, the same stimulus does not always provoke the same response, even from the same individual."

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 … 110402.htm

  2. bBerean profile image60
    bBereanposted 2 years ago

    As then, do Roombas.  wink

    1. janesix profile image60
      janesixposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      Roombas aren't living organisms. I doubt non-living things have free will.

      1. bBerean profile image60
        bBereanposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        I was just following the logic of the article to it's natural conclusion.  I disagree with the premise, but that is where it leads.

        1. janesix profile image60
          janesixposted 2 years ago in reply to this

          What exactly do you disagree with?

          1. bBerean profile image60
            bBereanposted 2 years ago in reply to this

            Do  you think the article affirms free will or passive aggressively negates it by redefinition?  What better way to undermine a term or concept than misuse it until it is rendered meaningless?   Both the title and opening paragraph seem to say free will is real, but do so by claiming it is nothing more that what is seen in roundworms.  Acting as though they are supporting free will by explaining how external stimulus and "state of the network," (which is basically saying programming), compete to determine actions, they are really contradicting free will.  So which of the only two components they cite, automatic response to external stimuli or the competing programing, do you think constitute free will?

            All that's left is to equate the simple, (relatively speaking), worm to human sentience and voila, free will has been redefined as a product of biology, meaning no free will at all.  Scientism cannot allow or even tolerate the notion of free will because that by genuine definition requires spirituality ruling materialism:

            free will
            noun
            1.free and independent choice; voluntary decision: You took on the responsibility of your own free will.
            2.Philosophy. the doctrine that the conduct of human beings expresses personal choice and is not simply determined by physical or divine forces.

            Please reread the article and tell me if you find it supports the notion that the worm, animals or people have the ability to make personal choices which are "not simply determined by physical or divine forces."

            1. janesix profile image60
              janesixposted 2 years ago in reply to this

              I don't KNOW what free will is. That's why I started the discussion.

              It's why I asked if people thought that free will was choices made regardless of instincts.

              1. bBerean profile image60
                bBereanposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                I understand.  It just seemed as though you thought the article supported or endorsed the concept of free will, when it does quite the opposite.  Perhaps now you see what I meant with my initial comments regarding the Roomba.

                1. janesix profile image60
                  janesixposted 2 years ago in reply to this

                  I just thought it would make an interesting discussion.

                  I "feel" like I have free will.

                  I think perhaps animals do to, but to varying degrees.

  3. Disappearinghead profile image87
    Disappearingheadposted 2 years ago

    My cat has a free will. You can see him thinking "who's got the most comfy lap to sit on this evening?"

    1. janesix profile image60
      janesixposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      I agree. Do you think humans have more free will than other animals?

  4. sparkster profile image93
    sparksterposted 2 years ago

    There is no such thing as free will. Every choice and every decision you may is influenced by your environment, your surroundings and the situations you find yourself in.

    1. janesix profile image60
      janesixposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      Influenced, yes. But does that mean you have to have to make a certain choice?

      You seem to be saying our choices are predetermined.

  5. Kathryn L Hill profile image84
    Kathryn L Hillposted 2 years ago

    - maybe the worm was full.

    its all about the degree to which the stimulus is programmed by nature.

    Humans have less programming, therefore more choices / free will.

    TWISI

    1. janesix profile image60
      janesixposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      That's what I was thinking.

 
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