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The Ten Commandments comes from the Egyptian Book of the Dead

  1. Claire Evans profile image91
    Claire Evansposted 2 years ago

    Here are the comparisons between the 10 Commandments and he Book of the Dead:

    Book of the Dead: "I have done away sin for thee and not acted fraudulently or deceitfully. I have not belittled God. I have not inflicted pain or caused another to weep. I have not murdered or given such an order. I have not used false balances or scales. I have not purloined (held back) the offerings to the gods. I have not stolen. I have not uttered lies or curses."

    bullet    Exodus 20:7-16: "Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain....Thou shalt not kill. Thou shalt not commit adultery...Thou shalt not bear false witness against they neighbor..."

    Why are Christians so affronted by this? After all, Moses was raised in an Egyptian household.

    1. Paul Wingert profile image79
      Paul Wingertposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      I tried to look for anything related to Moses' existence. The Egyptians never heard of him, the great migration (although the idea of Hebrews and other Semitic tribes leaving the area are mentioned, by there weren't that many. Maybe a few hundred tops. The largest city was Thebes in the supposed timeline and it barely had a population of 45-50k.) and there's zero evidence that Hebrews were ever held as slaves. All construction projects were carried out by paid conscripts. Then again they never heard of a world wide flood either. But that's another topic. So I came to the conclusion that Exodus was based on a very loose account of an undisputed mini migration to settle in the Canaanite Empire. They would of simply took the popular trade rout that went from Egypt to Jericho to Canaan-a trip that would of took 3 weeks. There's no evidence or record that they knocked down Jericho's wall (they were knocked down over 15 times but earthquakes before being abandoned and they did not conquer Canaan. Everyone but Hebrews did. The Exodus metaphor is also used to explain how the Hebrews went from polytheists to monotheists.

      1. Claire Evans profile image91
        Claire Evansposted 24 months ago in reply to this

        I tend to agree with you.  Well written. About the global flood, cultures all over the world have a "Noah" story of a great flood.  It didn't cover the whole earth and drown everyone, of course, but it seemed to have been experienced across the world.

        1. Paul Wingert profile image79
          Paul Wingertposted 24 months ago in reply to this

          Just about all major cities, then and now are built along rivers or large bodies of water for obvious reasons. Of these bodies of water that experience annual flooding, you'll find flood stories associated with them.

          1. Claire Evans profile image91
            Claire Evansposted 24 months ago in reply to this

            Yes, but they all have an Ark them.  Here are examples.

            Sumerian:
            The gods had decided to destroy mankind. The god Enlil warned the priest-king Ziusudra ("Long of Life") of the coming flood by speaking to a wall while Ziusudra listened at the side. He was instructed to build a great ship and carry beasts and birds upon it. Violent winds came, and a flood of rain covered the earth for seven days and nights. Then Ziusudra opened a window in the large boat, allowing sunlight to enter, and he prostrated himself before the sun-god Utu. After landing, he sacrificed a sheep and an ox and bowed before Anu and Enlil. For protecting the animals and the seed of mankind, he was granted eternal life and taken to the country of Dilmun, where the sun rises.

            Bhil (central India):
            Out of gratitude for the dhobi feeding it, a fish told a dhobi (a pious man) that a great deluge was coming. The man prepared a large box in which he embarked with his sister and a cock. After the flood, a messenger of Rama sent to find the state of affairs discovered the box by the cock's crowing. Rama had the box brought to him and questioned the man. Facing north, east, and west, the man swore that the woman was his sister; facing south, the man said she was his wife. Told that the fish gave the warning, Rama had the fish's tongue removed, and fish have been tongueless since. Rama ordered the man to repopulate the world, so he married his sister, and they had seven daughters and seven sons. The firstborn received a horse as a gift from Rama, but, being unable to ride, he instead went into the forest to cut wood, and so his descendants have been woodcutters to this day.

            Assam (northeastern India):
            A flood once covered the whole world and drowned everyone except for one couple, who climbed up a tree on the highest peak of the Leng hill. In the morning, they discovered that they had been changed into a tiger and tigress. Seeing the sad state of the world, Pathian, the creator, sent a man and a woman from a cave on the hill. But as they emerged from the cave, they were terrified by the sight of the tigers. They prayed to the Creator for strength and killed the beasts. After that, they lived happily and repopulated the world

            Trique (Oaxaca, southern Mexico):
            Nexquiriac sent down a great flood to punish mankind for its very wicked ways. He instructed one good man to make a large box and to preserve himself in it, along with many animals and seeds of certain plants. When the flood was almost over, Nexquiriac told the man not to come out, but to bury the box, along with himself, until the face of the earth had been burned. After that was done, the man emerged and repopulated the earth

            Here are more examples:

            http://www.talkorigins.org/faqs/flood-m … l#Sumerian

            So it wasn't a case of annual flooding.  This was a global flood.  Obviously a massive catastrophe.

            1. Paul Wingert profile image79
              Paul Wingertposted 23 months ago in reply to this

              All greatly exaggerated myths. The Epic of  Ziusudra, in your first example, is based on an actual even where the Euphrates River overran the levees in the Sumerian city of Shurrupak. The story goes that Ziusudra, was a priest/king/merchant who oversaw the loading of livestock, grains and beer on a trade barge and happened to be aboard with the loading crew when they got caught up in the storm and swept out into the Persian Gulf. The "world" was the environment you lived in during those times. In the Babylonian version of the  Epic of Gilgamesh, it describes their world that stretched between the Euphrates and the Tigress (Edin - a Sumerian word that mean "grassy plain). Beyond the Tigress are the Zerigos Mts (with the Emoire of Elam at it's base) and that was the end of the world.  So their "world" was a completely different understanding that what we know of it today. They believed the earth was a flat disk surrounded by mountain ranges that supported a dense watery barrier called the firmament (Accepted until 1600 after the invention of the telescope). Space was a vast ocean of primeval waters and below was the Netherworld.

              1. Claire Evans profile image91
                Claire Evansposted 23 months ago in reply to this

                But how can cultures around the world have the same Ark theme?  In India, a man was warned of a flood and brought an animal.  And then in Mexico, Nexquiriac sent down a great flood to punish mankind for its very wicked ways. How on earth does this match Genesis when they couldn't possibly have know about the other?

                How can water breaching the levees be considered considered such a catastrophe if it was recorded to last for seven days? What you said about the river is a version that was added later to the the global flood one. 


                What local flooding happened in Mexico, India, etc, that would make them have stories of a global flood?

                The same motif of all these stories about gods punishing mankind and sending a flood is just too coincidental.  Something, or someone, traveled across the world spreading the same story. 

                We could also consider that there was such a global catastrophe that that a tsunami could have reached all continents.

    2. Writer Fox profile image78
      Writer Foxposted 23 months ago in reply to this

      The Book of the Dead consists of funerary texts and magic spells meant to aid the dead through a difficult journey to the afterlife.  According to John Taylor, curator of the Egyptian Book of the Dead exhibit at the British Museum, "The text consists of a number of magic spells intended to assist a dead person's journey through the Duat, or underworld, and into the afterlife. The Book of the Dead was part of a tradition of funerary texts which includes the earlier Pyramid Texts and Coffin Texts, which were painted onto objects, not papyrus. Some of the spells included were drawn from these older works and date to the 3rd millennium BCE."

      The passage you noted bears no resemblance to the commandments in the Hebrew Bible.

      This is from The Book of the Dead:

      "I know thee, I know thy name, I know the names of the 42 gods who are with thee in this broad hall of the Two Truths . . . Behold, I am come unto thee. I have brought thee truth; I have done away with sin for thee. I have not sinned against anyone. I have not mistreated people. I have not done evil instead of righteousness ...
      I have not reviled the god.
      I have not laid violent hands on an orphan.
      I have not done what the god abominates …
      I have not killed; I have not turned anyone over to a killer.
      I have not caused anyone's suffering …
      I have not copulated (illicitly); I have not been unchaste.
      I have not increased nor diminished the measure, I have not diminished the palm; I have not encroached upon the fields.
      I have not added to the balance weights; I have not tempered with the plumb bob of the balance.
      I have not taken milk from a child's mouth; I have not driven small cattle from their herbage ...
      I have not stopped (the flow of) water in its seasons; I have not built a dam against flowing water.
      I have not quenched a fire in its time …
      I have not kept cattle away from the god's property.
      I have not blocked the god at his processions."

      Now, compare that to the Ten Commandments in the Hebrew Bible:

      http://www.mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt0220.htm
      http://www.mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt0505.htm

      I can't believe you see a similarity between the Biblical text and the magical spells from ancient Egypt!

      In the words of Garrison Keillor, "Are you getting enough ketchup in your diet?"

      1. colorfulone profile image89
        colorfuloneposted 23 months ago in reply to this

        Wow, how could they not see?  Could they be blind? 
        There is not a thing that is similar, nothing.  lol

        1. Ta-Iset profile image75
          Ta-Isetposted 23 months ago in reply to this

          The only ones who are blind are the ones closed minded, to the true facts, and believe only one book that has been discredited time and time again from REAL facts, science, and archeology. I suggest you do some real research:

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y0XMx15GTik
          And: https://www.google.ca/search?site=& … T91nEV1uvI

          Download the book, read all of it, and then tell me that we are the blind ones.... We are not blind. You need to open your eyes.

      2. Claire Evans profile image91
        Claire Evansposted 23 months ago in reply to this

        Yes, it is a funerary text but the deceased person is pleading his case by saying he did break any of the "commandments".  It's rather similar that the Egyptian Book of the Dead means not taking the god"s name in vain, hasn't stolen, bore false witness, not murdered, not committed adultery.  I'm not saying all commandments of the Bible matches what is in the Book of the Dead.

      3. cam8510 profile image93
        cam8510posted 4 weeks ago in reply to this

        Are you serious? You can't see any similarities between this list and the Ten Commandments? I suppose it comes down to what is meant by "similarities." If you require word for word likeness, then I'd have to agree. But I could take a lot of these from the BOTD and categorize them under one or the other of the TCs.  Does it prove origin? Consultation? Coincidence?

        I'll give a few examples of similarity
        1. I have not killed; I have not turned anyone over to a killer/Murder
        2.I have not copulated (illicitly); I have not been unchaste/Adultery
        3.I have not increased nor diminished the measure, I have not diminished the palm; I have not encroached upon the fields/Stealing
        4.I have not added to the balance weights; I have not tempered with the plumb bob of the balance/Lying

        It seems it would be very difficult to not see similarities. I'm not saying the Ten Commandments came from the BOTD, but it is difficult to not see a few similarities. Some offenses are universally condemned, so it wouldn't  be surprising for two nations to have similar laws on such matters.

  2. Phil Perez profile image81
    Phil Perezposted 2 years ago

    Or....maybe the Egyptian Book of the Dead comes from The Ten Commandments ?
    It could be the opposite, can't it? Who really knows? Unless religion wasn't around before or the same time as when the Egyptians created Pyramids and other burial/sacrificial areas in Egypt. I have no clue, I'm just making a proposition for further discussion.

    1. Claire Evans profile image91
      Claire Evansposted 24 months ago in reply to this

      Yes, but the Egyptian Book of the Dead is older than the Torah. 

      "The revelation to Moses at Mount Sinai is considered by most to be the revelatory event. According to dating of the text by Orthodox rabbis, this occurred in 1312 BCE; another date given for this event is 1280 BCE"

      The Book of the Dead was used in 1700 BC.  The first funerary text is as old 2400 BC. 

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_t … ite_note-5

    2. cam8510 profile image93
      cam8510posted 4 weeks ago in reply to this

      The Book of the Dead was first formed around 3000 BC. The Ten Commandments were written around 1500 BC.

  3. janesix profile image61
    janesixposted 2 years ago

    Christians don't like it because won't admit their religion is just a mishmash stolen from other religions.

    1. Paul Wingert profile image79
      Paul Wingertposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      http://usercontent2.hubimg.com/12494447_f248.jpg

      1. Claire Evans profile image91
        Claire Evansposted 24 months ago in reply to this

        Like what was stolen?

        1. Paul Wingert profile image79
          Paul Wingertposted 24 months ago in reply to this

          Jewish monotheism was stolen from Egyptian Akhenaton 

          The Jewish creation was stolen from the Egyptian Creation

          The Jewish Yahweh's use of the word to create was stolen from the Egyptians (Jewish Yaweh replaces Ptah)

          "Let there be Light" was stolen from the Theban Creation epic.
          The "firmament in the midst of the waters…" was stolen from the Egyptian Creation. The idea of the firmament was also used in the Sumerian cosmology model until 1600 when the telescope was invented.

          Adam and Eve were stolen from the Egyptian Geb and Nut 5

          Eve coming from Adam's rib was stolen from the Epic of Enki and

          Ninhursag: "My brother what hurts thee?
          "My rib hurts me"
          ANET.
          Ninti who's name means
          "Lady of the Rib" cured Enki's rib6

          Adam and Eve's punishment and loss of immortality were stolen from the Mesopotamian story of Adapa.

          Jewish Cain, Abel and Seth were stolen from Osiris, Set and Horus8

          The conflict between Cain and Abel was stolen from Set and Osiris and as the story goes on, it is later based upon the Sumerian Dumuzi and Enkimdu

          Jewish Samson was stolen from Heracles,

          The putting out of his eyes is based on Oedipus

          The pulling down of the pillars was stolen from the Egyptian tale about Re-Herakhte

          The Jewish story of Jacob and the Ladder was stolen from the Egyptian Funerary Rituals for the deceased King
          "Hail to thee, O Ladder of God, Hail to thee, O Ladder of Set. Stand up O Ladder of God, Stand up O Ladder of Set, stand up O Ladder of Horus, whereon Osiris went forth into heaven.” “The Egyptian Ladder consisting of the bodies of two Egyptian deities upon which Osiris ascends into heaven, has been replaced by a ladder with several supernatural beings, angels, climbing up and down between earth and heaven."

          Jewish Moses was stolen from several Gods and kings, depending on what stage of his life story:

          Sargon (the birth and abandonment in the river, being rescued by royalty, etc)

          The wanderings in the desert were based upon the Sun-God Bacchus as seen in the Hymns of Orpheus 12

          The Hebrew stint of "40 years in the desert" claimed in the Jewish book of Exodus and the subsequent "40 day and 40 nights" wanderings in the desert of the Jewish Nazarene were stolen from:
          "The struggle of Set and Horus in the desert lasted forty days, as commemorated in the forty days of the Egyptian Lent, during which time Set, as the power of drought and sterility, made war on Horus in the water and the buried germinating grain....These forty days have been extended into forty years, and confessedly so by the Jews."13

          Jewish Joshua was stolen from the Egyptian Deities Shu and Nun.

          Jewish Deborah was stolen from the Egyptian Goddess Neith

          Jewish Noah was stolen from Sumerian The Epic of Ziusudra.
          The Jewish God Yaweh in the Noah story replaced the Sumerian God Enlil

          Noah's son Jewish Ham was stolen from Belus

          Jewish Nimrod was stolen from the Egyptian Pharaoh Sesostris

          Jewish Abraham was stolen from King Hariscandra of the Hindu Sankhayana-Sutras

          Jewish Isaac was stolen from King Hariscandra's son Rohita
          The fictitious Jewish God Yaweh in this story replaced the Hindu God Varuna

          Jewish character Daniel was stolen from Egyptian Neferti

          Jewish Jonah and the whale; Jonah was stolen from the Hindu character "Saktideva" found in the Somadeva Bhatta.

          The "Twelve Tribes of Israel" like the Twelve Disciples of Christ are based upon the twelve signs of the Zodiac.

          Jewish Lot and his wife were stolen from the Greek Orpheus and Eurydice
          Jewish Yaweh replaces the Greek God Hades

          Jewish Jacob and Jewish Esau were stolen from Horus and Set

          Jewish Rebekah was stolen from The Egyptian Goddess Isis

          Jewish Joseph with the eleven brothers was stolen from Egyptian Psammetichus

          Jewish story of Joseph and Potipher's wife stolen from Egyptian Anubis and Bata

          "The Ten Plagues" against Egypt were grossly exaggerated and altered and stolen from the Ipuwer Papyrus

          The Ten commandments was stolen from The Code of Hammurabi Jewish Yaweh replaces the Sumerian Sun God Shamash aka Azazel

          Jewish David killing Philistine Goliath were stolen from Thor throwing a hammer at Hrungnir and striking him in the forehead.

          The Jewish Job was stolen from Ugaritic Keret and Jewish Yaweh replaces the God "El."

          1. Claire Evans profile image91
            Claire Evansposted 23 months ago in reply to this

            The Jewish creation story was based on the Sumerian creation story.

            The story of Cain and Abel also comes from the Sumerian Tablets which mention Kael killing Abael.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kw81zdVEc0M

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kw81zdVEc0M

            "The Jewish Yahweh's use of the word to create was stolen from the Egyptians (Jewish Yaweh replaces Ptah)"

            Can you elaborate on this? 


            "Jewish Samson was stolen from Heracles"

            I believe Samson came from the Epic of Gilgamesh.  It's the oldest poem of mankind.  Enkidu was Samson.  The Jews were heavily influenced by the Sumerians.

            http://centristy.hubpages.com/hub/A-Com … -Gilgamesh

            "Let there be Light" was stolen from the Theban Creation epic.

            Most likely from the Enuma Elish.  It is an old Babylonian creation story.  Why I say this is because Genesis is said to be written during the Jewish Babylonian exile.

            Can you give me the exact quote of the phrase "Let there be light" in the Theban Creation story.

            "Jewish Jonah and the whale; Jonah was stolen from the Hindu character "Saktideva" found in the Somadeva Bhatta."

            I think rather:

            The other clue to the Mesopotamian origin of the “Jonah” story is in the reference to him having been in the belly of the fish for “three days and three nights.”  Any time you see a reference to any prophet, messiah, god, king, or holy man, being locked up in a tomb, swallowed by a fish, the abyss of the deep, or otherwise being shut out from the light of day and from the face of the earth for a period of three days and three nights, you know that this is nothing more than a direct borrowing from the most ancient moon god cult of Mesopotamia and Arabia.

            http://www.biblebabel.net/who-was-jonah.php

            These are just some of the ones I am going to address.  I was actually more interested in the supposed copies of Jesus.

            1. Paul Wingert profile image79
              Paul Wingertposted 23 months ago in reply to this

              The Sumerian culture was already long gone and absorbed into the Akkadian culture by the time the Jews came around. Although the Sumerian literature was well preserved. I read that Adam and Eve were based on a Sumerian story and there's no doubt that the Egyptian story is similar. Biblical Genesis and the Eridu Genesis are almost identical. As far as the "let there be light" this is not light given off by the sun, as many would assume. In Biblical Genesis, it's confusing when it says "let there be light on the 1st day and the moon and sun weren't created until the 4th day, giving the question "how could 4 days have past?" Again, that evolves around the Sumerian cosmology model. The Sumerian cosmologists, as well as the Hebrew and Babylonian cosmologists saw that sun as a heat and power source for the god, Utu/Shamash (for the Sumerians and Babylonians). They really had no explanation for the light source except that it came from beyond the primeval waters above (space) which explained why the sky was blue. The moon, stars, and sun traveled within the domed firmament, just above the clouds. This was the accepted cosmology model used throughout the Middle East and Eastern Europe. The first challenge came from Greece in 200BC when a proposed theory came about suggesting that the earth was not a flat disk held up by pillars (pillars of the earth which appears in the Bible and other ancient texts) but a sphere. I don't see the parallel between Sampson and Enkidu. Enkidu was created to be Gilgamesh's equal in strength but were complete opposites. If you read any of these ancient Babylonian/Sumerian translations, you'll notice that Biblical Genesis  follows the same format. "In the beginning, G-d created the heavens and the earth." is not a statement, but the title of the sentence or paragraph. This is also pointed out in the Torah. If read from the Torah, it indicate that the earth was already here, but formless, just as the Eridu Genesis points out. Genesis also points out that God acknowledges other gods and other people living on earth as well. When God says, "Lets make man in our own image..." He's talking to someone. When Adam and Eve eat the forbidden fruit, God exclaims,  "...they are now like us..." I'm still reading about the Council of Nicea, these are the 200 or so bishops that spent a month debating the Jesus thing. These are the guys that created Easter and the link between Jesus and God. It was these councils appointed by the Roman Emperor Constantine that compiled the New Testament. Jesus was unknown until the 2-3 Century AD following the gathering of these councils which makes one wonder hmmm.

              1. Claire Evans profile image91
                Claire Evansposted 23 months ago in reply to this

                As you say, even though Sumeria was conquered, the literature is preserved.  Did you know the Babylonian Talmud is the highest law in Judaism?



                Enkidu, like Samson, was a savage hero who never had his hair cut.  Gilgamesh wrestled with Enkidu and Gilgamesh is represented as a lion. 

                https://sites.google.com/a/pvlearners.n … ia-located

                Gilgamesh sends a prostitute, Samhat, to tame Enkidu.  Samson sleeps with the prostitute, Delilah.  The story isn't an exact match but I'm sure it is a source. 



                Yes, the earth was already in existence as you say.  However, God is actually translated as gods.  They are talking amongst themselves.  And according to the Sumerian tablets, the gods genetically modified humans to make them in their own image. 

                "This was originally the symbol for the Anunnaki-Sirian creator god, EA, or EN.KI (who has become an Archetype), was the chief of the magicians, "the one who knows," and infamous for being the serpent of the Garden of Eden who created lifeforms in test tubes half a million years ago with his half-sister Ninharsag, at the suggestion of his son, Marduk, to create humans to be the workers for the gods."

                http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sumer … naki07.htm




                Are you saying Christianity started with the Council of Nicea? Who were the people persecuted for worshipping Christ? Who was Paul talking about in His letters?

                It is just not true that Jesus is was not unknown until the 2-3 AD.   In  Annals 15.44 written by 1st century historian, Tacitus, wrote:

                "But not all the relief that could come from man, not all the Bounties that the prince could bestow, nor all the atonements Which could be presented to the gods, availed to relieve Nero From the infamy of being believed to have ordered the Conflagration, the fire of Rome. Hence to suppress the rumor, he Falsely charged with the guilt, and punished Christians, who were Hated for their enormities. Christus, the founder of the name, was Put to death by Pontius Pilate, procurator of Judea in the reign Of Tiberius: but the pernicious superstition, repressed for a time Broke out again, not only through Judea, where the mischief Originated, but through the city of Rome also, where all things Hideous and shameful from every part of the world find their Center and become popular. Accordingly, an arrest was first Made of all who pleaded guilty; then, upon their information, an Immense multitude was convicted, not so much of the crime of Firing the city, as of hatred against mankind."

                So there was no Jesus conspiracy.

                1. Paul Wingert profile image79
                  Paul Wingertposted 23 months ago in reply to this

                  I'm not saying the council invented Christianity. The council first met in the 3rd Century AD and by then Emperor Constantine already had legalized it.

                  I need to make a correction. I meant to say that Jesus doesn't not appear in any Roman or Greek  notes, letters or any correspondence until after the 3rd century - outside the early Christian sect(s). He was first mentioned by Paul 30+ years after the crucifixion and of course, as I understand it, he's one of the founding fathers of Christianity.   

                  Interesting about Babylonian Talmud and your last paragraph. Thank you for sharing. Another item to add to my list of something I learned today.

                  Also I didn't know about Sampson sleeping with the prostitute. I admit that as far as the story of Sampson, I'm only familiar with the children's version - prostitute free. A lady wrote a children's version of the Epic of Gilgamesh and I'm curious how she worked the part where Shamhat had sex with Enkidu in the woods for six days and seven nights (at least that's how long he stayed aroused (apparently they knew something we don't, the best we can do nowadays is up to 4 hours) to tame him. The Sumerians/Babylonians had this thing for the number six and seven. Everything was six days and seven nights where in the OT and NT everything is 40 and second son.

                  Enki (or EA in Babylonian) was the god of creativity, mischief, and was credited for teaching the humans how to procreate. They myth goes that the humans were so noisy during procreation that they disturbed the gods' sleep and they voiced their complaints to Enlil - God of storms. That was the reason why Enlil called together the Annaki (Council of Gods) to unveil his plan of killing all the humans with a flood. Enki went behind Enlils back and warned Ziusudra (Utnapishtim in the Epic of Gilgamesh)  and instructed him to build a giant boat out of reeds and coat it with pitch, etc, etc. The snake in the Garden in Eden in Hebrew mythology was just a talking snake with no ties to anyone, let alone Enki. Snakes in Middle Eastern Mythology has always been viewed as a symbol for eternal life (the way they shed their skin). 

                  In the Sumerian Eridu Genesis, Enki was one of the creators of humans and in another myth. Enki and Inanna, Enki dwells in the swamps outside Eridu and is the keeper of the Mes (instruction on civilization).

                  1. Claire Evans profile image91
                    Claire Evansposted 23 months ago in reply to this



                    That is not true.  First century historian Tacitus, wrote in his work in Annals 15.44:

                    But not all the relief that could come from man, not all the Bounties that the prince could bestow, nor all the atonements Which could be presented to the gods, availed to relieve Nero From the infamy of being believed to have ordered the Conflagration, the fire of Rome. Hence to suppress the rumor, he Falsely charged with the guilt, and punished Christians, who were Hated for their enormities. Christus, the founder of the name, was Put to death by Pontius Pilate, procurator of Judea in the reign Of Tiberius: but the pernicious superstition, repressed for a time Broke out again, not only through Judea, where the mischief Originated, but through the city of Rome also, where all things Hideous and shameful from every part of the world find their Center and become popular. Accordingly, an arrest was first Made of all who pleaded guilty; then, upon their information, an Immense multitude was convicted, not so much of the crime of Firing the city, as of hatred against mankind.

                    Here are other  who mention Jesus and Christianity before the 3rd century AD.

                    http://thedevineevidence.com/jesus_history.html



                    You're welcome.



                    Lol.  I also remember only reading the children's version.  The sanitized version.  Obviously there is numerology involved with the numbers.  I believe the early Christian writers wrote that Jesus fasted in the wilderness for 40 days just so that it could correspond with the flood and Moses' fasting.  By no means do I believe Jesus really did fast for 40 days.  That's impossible.



                    The snake is also a symbol of healing.  For example, Moses erected a brazen serpent on instructions by God.  If the Israelites looked at it, they'd be healed.  That serpent was called Nehushtan.  It is the name of the Serpent of Wisdom.  These were worshiped around the world as snake gods and goddess.   For example, in Central America, there was Quetzacoatl, a god of wisdom.   Now Enki was also considered the god of wisdom.  So are we to assume that Moses was worshiping Enki?

  4. Perspycacious profile image78
    Perspycaciousposted 2 years ago

    See  the following to add to this discussion:  The Book of Moses and The Book of Abraham.

    God is a just God, who known by any name will judge all peoples the same, and the keys to His judgements will be the same for all peoples, and should therefor be known to all peoples.

    1. wilderness profile image95
      wildernessposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      I don't see the Koran listed?  Or the Book of Mormon?  What about the holy writings of Buddhism?

      ALL gods are just gods - according to the people that believe in them.  And all others are fiction and/or injust.

    2. Paul Wingert profile image79
      Paul Wingertposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      There's 4,000 different gods so I'm assuming that we're talking about is Yahweh, who was 1 of 33 gods worshiped by the Canaanites who is now the Judeo/Christian god. The 10 commandments and proverbs tend to have an Egyptian origin. All of Genesis is a rip off from much earlier Sumerian stories. I used to think Jesus was a historical figure until I read about the Roman councils appointed by the Emperor throughout the 3rd century. I tend to lean towards that Jesus was a combination of several different teachers/healers/prophets.

      1. Claire Evans profile image91
        Claire Evansposted 24 months ago in reply to this

        What did you read about the Roman councils?  Yahweh was indeed a Canaanite god but is not the Father of Jesus.

        1. vector7 profile image59
          vector7posted 23 months ago in reply to this

          Mmm, request for elaboration Miss Evans. Odd to be typing to familiar faces. You certainly always have statements that make me cross-eyed for a couple seconds.

          smile

          1. Claire Evans profile image91
            Claire Evansposted 23 months ago in reply to this

            Okay, I'll give you some quotes:

            The name Yahweh may have originated among desert tribes. The Bible indicates that the early Israelites identified Yahweh with the older god El, who was widely worshipped in Canaan. For example, there is a story of Abraham's meeting with Melchizedek, the mysterious priest-king of Salem (the future Jerusalem):

            Then Melchizedek king of Salem brought out bread and wine. He was priest of God Most High (El Elyon), and he blessed Abram, saying, "Blessed be Abram by God Most High, Creator of heaven and earth. And blessed be God Most High, who delivered your enemies into your hand." Then Abram gave him a tenth of everything. (Gen. 14:18-20)

            The deity to whom Abraham offers his tithe after sharing this sacred meal with Melchizedek is “El Elyon,” a form of the God El. El was the chief God of the Canaanite pantheon in the second millennium B.C.E., and figures into many old Canaanite myths. Later the more urbanized Canaanites replaced him with Baal as their chief God, but the Israelites were alien to these urban centers and identified with the people of the countryside who continued to worship El as the "highest god." Thus the residents of Salem, as well as other people of the region, knew the high god El. However, with regard to God as Yahweh, the Bible apparently reserves knowledge of the name to the chosen people.

            http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Yahweh

            We know even in the OT that there were many gods.  The Hebrews weren't monotheistic.  They did not believe in just one god:




            Exodus 15:11  asks about Yahweh "Who is like unto thee, O LORD, among the gods?"

            The earliest Yahwistic traditions reveal that Yahweh was a bedouin war god from the deserts of Edom and of the surrounding regions. His essentially warlike characteristics are demonstated by his name, by cultic celebrations of his mighty deeds, and by his ark.

            In the Bible, Yahweh is also referred to as a war god:

            "The Lord is a man of war; Yahweh is his name." – Exodus 15.3.

            We have the the Ugaritic texts, older than the OT. 

            Did not Abraham leave for Canaan from Ur? The Canaanite people there were already worshiping a god called Yahweh.  They were very close to the tribes around them and, of course, would be influenced by their gods.  El was the chief Canaanite god and one of his sons was Yahweh. Yahweh assigned by his father, El, Israel. 

            http://www.bewaredeception.com/index.ph … p;Itemid=3

            https://unspy.wordpress.com/2012/11/10/ … tic-roots/

            King David wrote in the Psalms that Yahweh was the god of gods.  The one true god.   The Jews back then were polytheists.  The cult of Yahweh was dying until the fall of Jerusalem to Babylon 587 BC.  After that, the second Isaiah wrote:Isaiah 44:6

            "This is what the LORD says-- Israel's King and Redeemer, the LORD Almighty: I am the first and I am the last; apart from me there is no God.


            Then Yahweh became a monotheistic god.  From then, the books of the Bible were written to make out that Yahweh was the only god.  Now it was accepted that El Shaddai and Yahweh were one and the same when it previously was not.  But we see the slip ups like when it says that God will make mankind in OUR image.

  5. Ta-Iset profile image75
    Ta-Isetposted 23 months ago

    I found this to be very interesting and informative. I wanted to know whether or not Moses and the Hebrews were really slaves in Egypt, and this has answered all of that. I am currently gathering information for a hub I'm writing about it. If anyone has any links for me to read to gather more, I'd appreciate it.

    Also I think that Christians are taught to be very narrow minded. Anytime someone mentions the correlation between the bible and myths from Egypt, or other nations, they seem to say the same thing. "The bible was around before that time, so maybe it was stolen from the bible" You link facts, and they say "I don't have to read it because I could write stuff on the internet and call it facts too, so it doesn't prove anything"

    I have encountered a lot of them don't really know how ignorant they are, along with how do you go to school and learn these things and then say "It's not true". I find it absolutely mind boggling. But if anyone can help me with my next hub, that would be great smile I just want pure facts, not bible versus thanks smile

    1. Claire Evans profile image91
      Claire Evansposted 23 months ago in reply to this

      Thanks.  I have tried to find out whether Moses and the Hebrews were really slaves and I came up with nothing.  Truth is, there is absolutely no evidence of it.  In fact, there is proof they even were in Egypt.    An Egyptologist claims she has proof but it was not well received.

      http://www.jewishjournal.com/passover/a … _20100324/

      You can also read about the Exodus conundrum here:
      http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Op-Ed-Cont … d-in-Egypt




      I was banned from a Christian forum for saying the Adam and Eve story wasn't true.  They get very vociferous when it comes to the Bible.  Even criticism is not allowed.  This is not right.  How are we supposed to get to the truth if we don't question?

      1. Lucid Psyche profile image61
        Lucid Psycheposted 23 months ago in reply to this

        "How are we supposed to get to the truth if we don't question?"

        That's one of the best questions anyone can ask. I take the position that there is an ultimate truth and we can get closer to it by asking reasonable questions. If someone gets pissed off that's often a good indication that you're on track. Truth plays second to the status quo for a lot of less than honorable reasons. Don't be put off, keep asking those questions and along the way question your own most fundamental assumptions.

        1. Claire Evans profile image91
          Claire Evansposted 23 months ago in reply to this

          Thank you! Glad you agree.

          1. Ta-Iset profile image75
            Ta-Isetposted 23 months ago in reply to this

            I agree we should question things. I'm sad that those who are answering our questions are dismissed, and disrespected...

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HiQ8l7Vbgic

            If you have a day when you're doing nothing, I also suggest this

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y0XMx15GTik

            And I suggest a book called serpent in the sky. I downloaded it yesterday and it's amazing!!!

            1. Claire Evans profile image91
              Claire Evansposted 23 months ago in reply to this

              Thanks, I've bookmarked those youtube videos.

  6. vector7 profile image59
    vector7posted 23 months ago

    Just thinking here.. if God does exist, which He does(my witness that is), I'm sure these values were held before the tablets were wrote by Moses.. In fact it would probably be fair to say they are pretty simple rules.. so, uh... Yeah, methinks they all came from the same place. Like from Noah's children, and before Noah, etc, so forth. I mean, I think we all get my point. I've got food on my mind. big_smile

    1. Claire Evans profile image91
      Claire Evansposted 23 months ago in reply to this

      So the Ten Commandments actually wasn't original to Moses, then? Why would God give them again if it was already established?

  7. Live to Learn profile image80
    Live to Learnposted 4 weeks ago

    I don't think anyone can accurately date the time any of these books was first written.

    Suffice it to say that all ancient people wanted to set down a set of rules which would be, in their minds, in line with the wants of their god. I am not surprised, or offended, that there are similarities between the books. I would be interested in knowing why anyone would be. Since the Hebrew nation had spent hundreds of years in Egypt I would think that the rules would be similar to those of the land they had left. Even if written by the finger of God himself.

    Remember, they were slaves for hundreds of years. I would assume they lacked much in the way of education and dealing with the lot of them would be tantamount to working with children. If you doubt, just read the account of their trek through the desert.

 
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