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Texas wants to edit the history books

  1. Mark Knowles profile image60
    Mark Knowlesposted 7 years ago

    Little did I realize, but the Texas Board of Education, after managing to get irrational beliefs introduced into the science classroom, by allowing critiques of evolution by non-scientists who believe an invisible super being created the earth in 6 days to be taught along side the actual science,  are now trying to get the history books re-written to reflect chistianity in a more favorable light. lol

    According to one of the reviewers, "We're in an all-out moral and spiritual civil war for the soul of America, and the record of American history is right at the heart of it."

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124753078523935615.html

    Dear oh dear.......

    1. Davinagirl3 profile image60
      Davinagirl3posted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Now, do you see why I want to home school?

      1. Mark Knowles profile image60
        Mark Knowlesposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Like I said - it depends on your motives. Most people seem to want to homeschool for the opposite reason. wink

        1. Davinagirl3 profile image60
          Davinagirl3posted 7 years ago in reply to this

          I want my child to be taught, not preached to.  I am afraid that is where we are headed.  I don't want my daughter to be afraid to speak her mind and question everything.

          1. SparklingJewel profile image66
            SparklingJewelposted 7 years ago in reply to this

            but whose to say what is being preached...why is it so hard for people to understand that people preach much more than religion...it is just too convenient to call religion talk preachy stuff...secular evolution and science is just another form of religion, and just as bad when it can't stand up next to another perspective on anything, especially from a God religion standpoint.

            KIds will figure out what they think according to many factors, not just their own or the parents. Why is creation such a bad perspective...when a person thinks that way about another person's perspective then they are just as bad as those they are accusing of doing the same thing. big_smile

            1. Pandoras Box profile image81
              Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Truth is the difference.

        2. Misha profile image74
          Mishaposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          You know Mark, us always have undercover agents, and them always have bloody spies. Or their terrorists and our freedom fighters for that matter. wink

          The point is - motive is always the same - people want their kids to pick up their values, not the state mandated ones. smile

    2. 0
      sandra rinckposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Oh for the love of satanic principals. lol  of course that is not really funny. sad

      1. Davinagirl3 profile image60
        Davinagirl3posted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I live in Texas and they are taking away so much from our children, it is ridiculous.  The public school system here is not academically competitive, to say the least.

        1. 0
          sandra rinckposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          ya, I hear ya.  I thinks they want our children to be stupid.  Over here in Cali.  they take away everything from the kids and needy first...

          Go to a church and ask for help... yeah right.  I tried that before. yikes

          I think America dropped down to the bottom of the list since Bush's no child left behind act, for the stupidest kids in the world.

          Probably because, they wont pay to have good teachers, good classroom sizes, good learning material... did you know some school are using outdated books!  ZOMFG!

          - if they did update them to reflect christianity, you would think they would include the number of wars in recent history to add to the pile of religious conflicts too.-  but maybe that is just a dream.

          1. Davinagirl3 profile image60
            Davinagirl3posted 7 years ago in reply to this

            Texas is a beautiful state with nice people.  But, its politics are so backward it is frightening.  It's like Fox News incarnate!

      2. drej2522 profile image86
        drej2522posted 6 years ago in reply to this

        it's a little funny big_smile

    3. 0
      Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Kudos to Texas!
      They're just trying to correct some of the hogwash that WAS either changed or ignored by more recent liberal "educators".   I put educators in quotes because so many modern "educators" are pseudo-educators feeding our children hog swill for history and social values.

      1. 0
        cosetteposted 6 years ago in reply to this



        "hog swill"? roll

        actually, what they are doing is taking out 75% of the world's history and literature and putting back stories culled from the Bible.

        here are one home-schooler's comments:

        "With traditional Christian textbooks, I generally don’t have to weed out information I would rather my children not be exposed to such as evolution, false religions and gods, mythology and fables. Romans 16:19 says, “For your obedience is come abroad unto all men. I am glad therefore on your behalf: but yet I would have you wise unto that which is good, and simple concerning evil.” Deuteronomy 12:30 tells us to, “Take heed to thyself that thou be not snared by following them, after that they be destroyed from before thee; and that thou inquire not after their gods, saying, How did these nations serve their gods? even so will I do likewise."

        how does this encourage critical thinking, or open-mindedness? if children aren't exposed to any other way of life, how will they successfully navigate through the world when they become adults?

        not to mention having huge gaps in their education and a wholesale ignorance of great literary works?

  2. soni2006 profile image46
    soni2006posted 7 years ago

    "now trying to get the history books re-written to reflect Christianity in a more favorable light"

    hahahhaha

  3. Dame Scribe profile image60
    Dame Scribeposted 7 years ago

    Historians won't be happy with that, tongue lol

  4. onthewriteside profile image73
    onthewritesideposted 7 years ago

    What are they going to call the new class?  "Myth"ory 101?  lol

  5. Randy Godwin profile image93
    Randy Godwinposted 7 years ago

    Well, that may be better than having someone from Texas creating bad history from the top government job for eight years. LOL

  6. David Bowman profile image59
    David Bowmanposted 7 years ago

    Perhaps we should allow Texas to secede after all.
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/04/1 … 87490.html

    1. Randy Godwin profile image93
      Randy Godwinposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Texas would make a good buffer zone for the border.

      1. Pandoras Box profile image81
        Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Yeah build the wall on this side of Texas. Because they've just proven that white Texans are more dangerous to society than Mexican immigrants ever could be.

  7. lrohner profile image84
    lrohnerposted 7 years ago

    Good thing the religious fanatics on here haven't found this thread yet! smile

  8. Uninvited Writer profile image83
    Uninvited Writerposted 7 years ago

    Shhhhhhhh

  9. rebekahELLE profile image92
    rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago

    o.k. I just found this thread after reading that they did approve new revisions for the textbooks for the next 10 years.

    the man in charge is in office until the end of the year, but he has been voted out.

    as of march 13, this is what I found, just posted it on FB.

    http://richarddawkins.net/articles/5245
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/03/1 … 98003.html

    you will want to watch the video. this is absolutely crazy.

    Thomas Jefferson is removed from being one of the great enlightenment thinkers and replaced with John Calvin.

  10. Rafini profile image86
    Rafiniposted 6 years ago

    my kids have learned evolution &  creation - creation was only mentioned in like one chapter while evolution went through the entire book!  Even though I don't agree with evolution I am glad to see that creation has finally been "approved" to be taught alongside the theory of evolution. 

    Plus, this year my son learned about religions of the world in his History class.  This is okay with me, because many world religions have had major impacts on the worlds history.

    I should have included prior:  Creation was taught at my kids school as a Theory.

    1. Paul Wingert profile image80
      Paul Wingertposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Hmmm, geology, astronomy, chemistry, and phyics being taught along side creation ( an ancient story on how the earth was magically created in 6 days and included a talking snake).  What's wrong with this picture?

  11. rebekahELLE profile image92
    rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago

    with these changes, it is clear the far right, religious faction of the board is imposing their religious, political bias to textbooks.  it's not just about evolution and creation.

  12. 0
    cosetteposted 6 years ago

    'k, this is very scary indeed...

    1. rebekahELLE profile image92
      rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      scary and just wrong. 

      texas purchases most of the nation's textbooks and influences much of what goes into all of the textbooks throughout the country.  college students in texas were protesting today.
      it's going to take more than college students.

  13. Pandoras Box profile image81
    Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago

    So go ahead and tell me again about how the beliefs of others don't affect me and I oughtta just respect their beliefs and leave them alone.

  14. Cagsil profile image61
    Cagsilposted 6 years ago

    Religion in school. What's next- the President sleeping with animals?

    Who thinks up this garbage? Re-writing history to portray Christianity in a better "light" is absurd.

    Christianity is what it is - a poorly thought out philosophy which was ill-conceived from it's inception.

    How can anyone spin that to make it sound better? lol lol

    1. Rafini profile image86
      Rafiniposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Can you deny the fact that many religions have played a major part in our worlds history?  Whether or not you feel it was beneficial?

    2. rebekahELLE profile image92
      rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      did you watch the video of the man explaining his reasoning??
      this guy is nuts. was this on the news today or yesterday and I missed it?  if you didn't read the article from the link, it's a must read just to see what they're doing.

      it's back one page. http://hubpages.com/forum/topic/18250#post883191

      1. Rafini profile image86
        Rafiniposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I am only going on the idea of teaching the theories of evolution & creationism, nothing more.  Teaching Religion does not belong in schools.  Period. 

        I did mention my son learned about world religions, and I think it's okay just cuz religion has affected world history.

  15. 0
    Madame Xposted 6 years ago

    This has very far-reaching implications. Texas is a huge market leader in the school-textbook industry. The enormous print run for Texas textbooks leaves most districts in other states adopting the same course materials, so that the Texas School Board effectively spells out requirements for 80 percent of the nation’s textbook market.

    Texas has been reviewing and approving textbooks since shortly after the Civil War, and, periodically, the rest of the country notices the clout it has. The last time this blew up was in the early 1990s.

  16. 0
    Kenrick Chatmanposted 6 years ago

    Another individual feeding the Texas "country bumpkin" stereotype. "You know that's just ain't right!"

    Unfortunately I will have to relocate from my native state to a suburb of Chicago (Lisle, IL) shortly.

  17. Onusonus profile image86
    Onusonusposted 6 years ago

    This thread has been set up to breed hatred. Some athiests can be just as credulous as some Christians.
    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,461424,00.html
    The bottom line is that the few loud people don't represent the whole organization.

    1. 0
      Kenrick Chatmanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I'm a Christian but I do not try to impose my views on others. I was born and raised in Texas. These individuals should be concerned with improving the quality of education in Texas especially the public school system.

      The Dallas Independent School District (DISD) has to be one of the worst public school districts in the nation. Several of this district best graduates struggle in college.

    2. rebekahELLE profile image92
      rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      the original thread was posted 8 months ago. I found it again tonight after I read the most recent news and I am not an atheist. it's not about hatred at all. it needs to be brought to the public's attention. imposing political, religious views in textbooks is wrong.

      1. Randy Godwin profile image93
        Randy Godwinposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        This is the danger of allowing believers to influence academic study in our public schools.  If a person of Muslim or other faith attempted this, the Christians would have a fit.

        1. rebekahELLE profile image92
          rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          it would be an outrage, as this should be. I couldn't believe it when I read what they are revising.

  18. thisisoli profile image63
    thisisoliposted 6 years ago

    Religion belongs in religious education.

    rewriting the history books to try and make it sound as though america was actually founded as a christian nation is appauling in what is meant to be a progressive nation.

  19. rebekahELLE profile image92
    rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago

    this is from the opinion page in yesterdays NYT.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/16/opinion/l16texas.html

    "Conservatives who are scorning Big Government might well turn attention to Texas, which is about to require that a Republican fictional history be taught to children throughout the state. This is government mind-control of young students who do not know to contest it."

    "The curriculum standards will now be published in a state register, opening them up for 30 days of public comment. A final vote will be taken in May, but given the Republican dominance of the board, it is unlikely that many changes will be made."

    1. 0
      Kenrick Chatmanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      "Religious" Republicans in Texas are quite interesting. George W for example who started the unprovoked, futile Iraq War. I guess "Thou shall not kill" did not apply.

      1. Daniel Carter profile image91
        Daniel Carterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Ouch. Methinks you do hit too close to the mark.
        Well put.

      2. 0
        Madame Xposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        "Unprovoked?"

        Oh, now I get it - rewriting of history . . . smile

        1. 0
          Kenrick Chatmanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          How was it provoked?

          1. Greek One profile image80
            Greek Oneposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            how was it provoked??

            Come on Kenrick.. what about all those weapons of mass destruction they are JUST about to uncover??

            1. 0
              Kenrick Chatmanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Oh, I forgot about that Greek One... Those WMDs were quite provoking.

              1. Greek One profile image80
                Greek Oneposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                you are referring to Saddam's eyebrows obviously smile

              2. 0
                Poppa Bluesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                What you fail to realize is the UN was being denied access to possible sites where WMDs might have been hidden.

                This was a purposeful act by Hussein. Remember he was at war with Iran and he WANTED to perpetuate the belief that he had nuclear weapons.

                He was caught between a rock and a hard place. He didn't want it to be proved that he didn't have weapons but he had to appear like he was complying with the UN mandates.

                Bush too became caught up in his own rhetoric and left himself no wriggle room. Once he made the ultimatum, Hussein had no choice but to comply yet he couldn't.

                This wasn't just a failure of American intelligence, but a misinformation success by Saddam. Fact is, had Saddam complied and allowed the UN access to all the sites in question, we wouldn't have gone to war with him. However, had he done so, Iran just may have!

                1. 0
                  Madame Xposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Ah, the voice of reason smile

                2. Greek One profile image80
                  Greek Oneposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  The UN was not leading the charge to get into Iraq..

                  but you are right.. if Saddam had done the politically impossible and bare all, then George Bush might have not had the support to wage an unjustified war...

                  despite the urging of the neo conservative war hawks that were bent on using 911 for their own objectives

                  1. 0
                    Poppa Bluesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    No but they were trying to carry out the provisions of a UN resolution that had broad international support.

                    I still maintain, that if Saddam, had allowed access he would have removed the excuse for America to go to war. His only other choices were to cut a deal for himself and leave voluntarily, or face America's military might.

                    Unfortunately for Saddam, he made the wrong choice.

                    Sadly, for America, we took out an enemy of Iran, and in the years to come, we may find their influence in the region growing. Strategically destroying Iraq may not have been the best course of action.

          2. 0
            Madame Xposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Um, 9/11? Ever hear of that? hmm

            1. Greek One profile image80
              Greek Oneposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Yeah... I think I remember??...

              wasn't 911 the terrible event that had absolutely NOTHING to do with Irag?

              1. 0
                Madame Xposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Where's Irag?

                1. Greek One profile image80
                  Greek Oneposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Irag was where all the WMDs where being kept.. cause they sure weren't in Iraq

                2. Ron Montgomery profile image61
                  Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  It's where Jebus was born according to the Texas public skool kericulim.

                  1. 0
                    Madame Xposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    Dang! You learn sumpin' new everday yikes

              2. Pandoras Box profile image81
                Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Depends on if you're going by the republican version of history or reality.

            2. Ron Montgomery profile image61
              Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Yeah, you've heard of 9/11.

              The latest Republican excuse for shredding the Constitution and thumbing our noses at the rest of the world.

              1. 0
                Madame Xposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Unlike the latest Democrat excuse called "healthcare"

                1. Ron Montgomery profile image61
                  Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Yes, the civilized world is all atwitter at the prospect of the U.S. actually providing healthcare to it's citizens.

                  Scary Stuff

                  1. 0
                    Madame Xposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    And the uncivilized world can't wait to see the end of the US Constitution

              2. Sab Oh profile image60
                Sab Ohposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                "shredding the Constitution" wouldn't mean anything to you anyway, right?

                1. Ron Montgomery profile image61
                  Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Of course it would TK...OJ... BJ...Hell, I can't keep up with all of your banning-induced name changes.

                  1. 0
                    Madame Xposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    Looking forward to celebrating?

                  2. Sab Oh profile image60
                    Sab Ohposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    "Of course it would"


                    I thought it was just a loose collection of suggestions written by evil, racist old white guys to you, and that we shouldn't worry about adhering to its words or principles.

            3. 0
              Kenrick Chatmanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Yes and Osama Bin Laden was the dictator in Iraq we removed from power. lol. The Republicans illustrated their national security intelligence with that maneuver.

          3. Sab Oh profile image60
            Sab Ohposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            "How was it provoked?"

            Ask the Clintons

            1. 0
              Madame Xposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              HA HA smile

      3. Sab Oh profile image60
        Sab Ohposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Are religious democrats in Texas not interesting to you?

        1. 0
          Kenrick Chatmanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Just individuals in power who use their "faith" to make bad decisions. You do know that Christians are a diverse group and do not agree with each other all of the time.

          1. Sab Oh profile image60
            Sab Ohposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Bad decisions are the ones you disagree with, right?

            All people of faith are informed by that faith in the decisions they make.

            1. 0
              Kenrick Chatmanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Bad decisions are bad decisions. Bush W probably had a reputation of a "country bumpkin" on a global basis.

              "A person, usually from a rural area, the south or small town; who speaks or behaves in a manner that indicates a lack of understanding of the ever changing, modern world. Country bumpkins tend to speak in terms of social overtones indicative of pre-civil rights America and characteristically speak in offensive terms without knowledge of doing so. A bumpkin is more ignorant than uneducated, though most are probably uneducated. Either way, educated or not, country bumpkins are neccesarily ignorant."

              1. Padrino profile image61
                Padrinoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                With a degree from Yale.

                1. 0
                  Kenrick Chatmanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  "A bumpkin is more ignorant than uneducated."

  20. Will Apse profile image90
    Will Apseposted 6 years ago

    Quoting from the Wall Street Journal referenced above

    'The curriculum, they say, should clearly present Christianity as an overall force for good -- and a key reason for American exceptionalism, the notion that the country stands above and apart.

    "America is a special place and we need to be sure we communicate that to our children," said Don McLeroy, a leading conservative on the board. "The foundational principles of our country are very biblical.... That needs to come out in the textbooks."

    Anyone who believes their country is somehow better than every other is a menace to their own country and their neighbors.

    Sadly, there is hardly a population in the world that can't be led into believing this- especially if they are less than perfectly secure in the value of their culture.

    I mean what is Al Qaeda all about? What bolstered the horrors of European colonialism? What was Nazism about?

    Dangerous men in Texas.

    1. 0
      Poppa Bluesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Not BETTER, but UNIQUE! Because the constitution says that our rights come from nature, and are bestowed upon us by the creator. No where else on the planet does that concept exist, and I see nothing wrong with mentioning that fact in a textbook. After all the founders came here FOR religious freedom and for the most part were Christians of one form or another. Should that be ignored? I don't think so!

  21. prettydarkhorse profile image65
    prettydarkhorseposted 6 years ago

    This is sad, changing history for your own sake wow, Doesnt men do that always, reinventing HISTORY for their own sake!

    1. Will Apse profile image90
      Will Apseposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      You're right, Pretty Dark Horse, we should all despair of men.

    2. 60
      (Q)posted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Pretty, you shouldn't be complaining about this as it is a perfect example of what people will do when they follow their belief systems.

      Notice that you didn't follow those beliefs yourself as you used logic and critical thinking to understand it makes no sense.

      See how that works? smile

      1. Ron Montgomery profile image61
        Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Yes, but as a previous poster will soon chime in, critical thinking and a lack of slavish devotion to certain documents inevitably leads to Communism; then of course Hell.

        1. 0
          Poppa Bluesposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Again, you miss the point, it's not blind adherence to a DOCUMENT, it's recognition of the concept that YOU are born with rights, they are yours because you exist, NOT because some document GIVES them to you! The right to be FREE, to be left alone, to pursue happiness as you see fit can not be taken away by government because they are not given to you by government!

          Get it?

          1. Sab Oh profile image60
            Sab Ohposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            He gets it, he just thinks he is terribly, terribly 'clever' roll

            1. Ron Montgomery profile image61
              Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Thanks TK.  You're a hoot.

  22. Rod Marsden profile image87
    Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago

    The six days bit for the creation of not only the world but of everything may actually be founded upon the misinterpretation of a Greek word. What was meant may have been ages rather than days which makes a great deal more sense. Also ages allows for the theory of evolution. Creationism or the new term that's floating around for it isn't science at all. Maybe it could be taught in bible class but it doesn't have any place in a science classroom and shouldn't be put up against Darwin's well thought out ideas as some alternative concept. DNA in recent years has gone a long way to confirming Darwin's ideas. Creationism is just magical nonsense. If the people of Texas want another monkey trial in the south they will no doubt get one but it will only do Texas more harm than good.

    Re-writing history even at the best of times is a very dangerous and also a very slippery slope.

    Yes, the Nazis had a go at it. They re-wrote German and then world history to suit themselves. They even made documentaries.

    Muslim nut jobs are also into re-writing history. Why not Christian nut jobs?

    Oh for some sane Muslims and Christians that respect history and see no need to tamper with what is known about the past.

  23. rebekahELLE profile image92
    rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago

    see how that works? indoctrination? kids believe what they're taught. they have a right to know the facts, to be taught how to think critically, not to have ideologies shoved in their face as history.

    McElroy is a dentist. now we have dentists rewriting history.

    1. Sab Oh profile image60
      Sab Ohposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      " they have a right to know the facts, to be taught how to think critically, not to have ideologies shoved in their face as history."

      Somebody's ideology is always shoved in their faces, unfortunately.

      1. Will Apse profile image90
        Will Apseposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Believe it or not Sab, academics whether historians, scientists and even economists have some pretty rigorous rules for establishing what is fact and what is opinion.

        It is also possible to present information as being either well  established or controversial and open to interpretation.

        In other words not everything is ideology.

  24. Daniel Carter profile image91
    Daniel Carterposted 6 years ago

    Hmmmmm, looks like the monkeys have taken over after all....

    1. Rod Marsden profile image87
      Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I like monkeys. Not keen on creationists. Monkeys are smarter.

      1. Daniel Carter profile image91
        Daniel Carterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        My point, exactamundo.

        1. Rod Marsden profile image87
          Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          You like monkeys, too? Good for you then Daniel.

  25. Greek One profile image80
    Greek Oneposted 6 years ago

    <--------- Church over here          State over here ---------->

    1. Rod Marsden profile image87
      Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Agreed Greek One. What's more, the French have agreed with that point of view since the French Revolution. It also works in Australia.

  26. rebekahELLE profile image92
    rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago

    I hope you've read the entire articles about the revisions, it's more than just creation/evolution. this board wants to rewrite history with a religious, republican slant.
    here's one: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/16/opinion/l16texas.html

    1. Sab Oh profile image60
      Sab Ohposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      And then other people want to remove mention of Christopher Columbus and include ten chapters about obscure figures who did not in fact alter the course of history but happen to fulfill a diversity criteria.

      Always someone's agenda...

    2. Rod Marsden profile image87
      Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      rebekahELLE, Re-writing history with a political agenda such as an American religious, republican slant has been acknowledged as dangerous and a slippery slope.

      I am not the only one here to mention the Nazis and their religious and political agenda in re-writing history for the Nazi cause. Anyone who re-writes their own history or that of other people for political or social gain of any sort are likely to create confusion or worse. Read 1984 by George Orwell for another voice on what can happen when we tamper with what we know of the past.

      1. rebekahELLE profile image92
        rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I've read 1984, years ago. in school. now it probably wouldn't be allowed.

        what a bunch of cowboys and dentists... woo hoo, let's rewrite history, folks.

        1. Rod Marsden profile image87
          Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          If you read 1984 then you know where I am coming from.

  27. Greek One profile image80
    Greek Oneposted 6 years ago

    Why does every other forum topic give the reader the impression that he is sitting in the jury at the Scopes Monkey Trial?

    1. Sab Oh profile image60
      Sab Ohposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      The banana peels

    2. Rod Marsden profile image87
      Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Think about it Greek One. We've also mentioned the Nazis and 1984.

      Sab Oh, I agree with you. I don't know how anyone could possibly remove Christopher Columbus from American history. It just doesn't make sense. Why not also remove Penn from American history while you are at it and rename Pennsylvania? Why not say the Spanish never came to the USA and rename Los Angeles and San Francisco? Why not say there was never a very special tea party once in Boston and then go on to say that the USA doesn't exist and that the American colonies are still part of the British Empire? Re-writing history can be fun!

      1. Sab Oh profile image60
        Sab Ohposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Oh, there are those of a certain ilk who would be only too happy to remove Penn and include a chapter on (sean) Penn. Anyone who refused to read and agree with that chapter would be imprisoned and given rectal cancer.

        Coming to theaters near you soon!

        1. Rod Marsden profile image87
          Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Good one Sab Oh!

  28. Daniel Carter profile image91
    Daniel Carterposted 6 years ago

    To put it another way, if the muslim religion were the predominant religion of Texas, this incident could actually be stated in the headlines as "rewritten with a muslim slant."

    Now where does that put all your God-luvin' acceptance and tolerance?

    1. Rod Marsden profile image87
      Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Doesn't matter who messes with history with an agenda in mind it is still messing with history with an agenda in mind.

      1. Daniel Carter profile image91
        Daniel Carterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Again, precisely my point.

  29. Greek One profile image80
    Greek Oneposted 6 years ago

    hold on a second...

    Texas has books??

    1. 0
      Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Yup.
      And BIG books too.
      big_smile

      1. Greek One profile image80
        Greek Oneposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        you mean those huge pop up books???

        smile

      2. Ron Montgomery profile image61
        Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        In Texas, they are refered to as doorstops.

        1. Sab Oh profile image60
          Sab Ohposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          So are you.

  30. 0
    Madame Xposted 6 years ago

    Where's A Texan when you need him . . .

    1. 0
      Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      He fell from HP grace 'cause of some libs who wanted to re-write history.   Yup we sure could use A Texan about now.

  31. Daniel Carter profile image91
    Daniel Carterposted 6 years ago

    Check this out:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l3VOa2F_BzM

    The movie has no US distributor because "America is too religious."
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne … erica.html

    Darwin didn't particularly disbelieve in God. His findings were independent of God. However, religionists were outraged at his findings.

    Regardless of what any one may think of Darwin, the truth cannot be forever covered up in zealotism. And I don't pretend to know what it is, but I would like to know, and therefore, don't really care what religionists or atheists believe.

    Darwin asked the hard questions that are only now becoming acceptable to ask without religious ridicule.

    1. rebekahELLE profile image92
      rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      looks interesting. hope it finds a US distributor. I'm sure it will.

      well if texas keeps this up, they'll have to get rid of all of the major holidays as they derived from pagan influence.

      o.k. must sign off and back to work. I wonder where knowles is.
      I'm sure he would like to see the latest news since he originated this thread many months ago.

      1. Rod Marsden profile image87
        Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Does this mean they'll be canceling Christmas since it was a pagan holiday before it became Christian? well, I suppose Easter also has to go...Too bad. I like Christmas and Easter.

      2. Pandoras Box profile image81
        Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Not when you rewrite history.

    2. Rod Marsden profile image87
      Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Here Daniel you are making a lot of sense.

    3. Pandoras Box profile image81
      Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Unless you're in these forums, of course.

  32. Padrino profile image61
    Padrinoposted 6 years ago

    Why is everybody upset about the nonexistent sky fairy? If he doesn't exist just call this creative thinking class. Atheists sure get excited about folklore.

    1. Rod Marsden profile image87
      Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      There are also a few Agnostics here and no doubt a few Christians who feel Darwin should be heard in schools and Columbus' voyage of discovery should be made known to students of American history. Oh and there is one lover of history here jumping up and down because he loves history.

  33. Greek One profile image80
    Greek Oneposted 6 years ago

    What does it matter what is written inside school books in Texas?

    No one actually reads them... they just store them up so they can provide cover for assassins who like to shoot liberal democrats

    1. Rod Marsden profile image87
      Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I have two friends living in Texas. They are published writers. One served in the US military. Since they write books I believe they also read them. For all I know they might be the only ones.

    2. rebekahELLE profile image92
      rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      it matters for a few reasons.

      this is clearly a far right, religious move that has deep $$.
      texas purchases most of the textbooks for the country. funny how they removed the word, 'capitalism' from the books and replaced it with 'free enterprise system.' one of the board members said capitalism had a negative implication...

      they wanted to eliminate Albert Einstein and replace him with an American... 

      this is the same board that banned, brown bear, brown bear from the 3 rd grade curriculum because they mistook the author Bill Martin, Jr. for another Bill Martin who wrote about marxism...

      country founded on the premise of freedom OF religion, not one religion for all. geez, didn't the texas rangers hang Hispanics?
      is this in the history book? Thomas Jefferson was a Deist, so he's replaced with John Calvin, the French theologian.

      1. Daniel Carter profile image91
        Daniel Carterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Wow. Replace Einstein with an "American." That seems so Aryan of them, which is ironic, since Einstein seems to fit that Germanic/Aryan background.

        Odd how White Supremacy is migrating, now, to needing to be more "American."

        1. rebekahELLE profile image92
          rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          yes, it's called "American Exceptionalism"  .... cough..

          here's a chuckle

          http://www.politicsdaily.com/2010/03/16 … ooks-yall/

          "Texas is in last place for high school graduation rates.
          For the second straight year, Texas has the lowest percentage of high school graduates in the nation, according to a U.S. Census Bureau study released Tuesday. "

          1. Daniel Carter profile image91
            Daniel Carterposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            *cough...*

            I think the long-horn state is full of bull. Apparently the math supports it.

            1. Padrino profile image61
              Padrinoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              It does unless you ACTUALLY read the source supplied.

              1. rebekahELLE profile image92
                rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                yes, thanks for the update. it was in a comment.
                now 43rd out of 50. a slight improvement.

                the point being, something is NOT working.

                1. Padrino profile image61
                  Padrinoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  As with all states the problem is teachers not students! There are exceptions to this but not very many.

                  1. rebekahELLE profile image92
                    rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    I don't have time to argue that one, I've been in both public and private schools. until we get rid of no child left behind, it's hard to teach other than to to the tests. pre-k is now kindergarten...

                    in some states, graduation standards have been lowered so much that graduation rates don't mean too much anyway. they are gathered differently also, if you check Ed Week, statistics are different from random searches. it doesn't help a student at all if he still graduates not knowing how to think critically and be able to problem solve.

                    teachers are not the biggest problem. they are part of it, but administration, state funding, curriculums, parents, media and students themselves all play an integral part of public education. many, certainly not all, children in public schools are totally dependent on the school itself for their education, their character training, their values as it's not taught at home.

                    off for now.

                  2. Pandoras Box profile image81
                    Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    No it's not, it's parents. Parents are responsible for the education of their children, and if the parents don't care, the children won't either. Thinking skills begin at home.

          2. Padrino profile image61
            Padrinoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Your stats are almost 4 years old, Texas is not last in High School graduation rates.


            http://www.politifact.com/texas/stateme … ed-states/

        2. Rod Marsden profile image87
          Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Daniel, how can A. Einstein fit the German/Aryan mold? He was born a Jew. He had to leave Europe because he was born a Jew. He came to America because he saw it as the land of freedom and opportunity because he was born a Jew.

      2. Pandoras Box profile image81
        Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Yes I guess they finally got the point about Jefferson. So now they just pretend he didn't exist. They keep it up they're gonna have to write off a bunch of the most active founders.

        How you gonna write off Jefferson? What the heck is wrong with these people?

        1. Rod Marsden profile image87
          Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Some if not all of the founding fathers of the USA were into Freemasonry. How does that sit with Texas?

  34. Padrino profile image61
    Padrinoposted 6 years ago

    Having visited Texas a time or two for business I can guarantee Texans do not care what the rest of the world/country thinks of them.

    They will continue to be the most innovative people on earth with a great economy, my state should take lessons from Texas on how not to self destruct, whoops too late!

  35. alexandriaruthk profile image54
    alexandriaruthkposted 6 years ago

    History is very important, politics should not come into it, It is a nations history of being and becoming -- it should be exact -- in ideal terms -- and leave it as it should be

    isnt it that history should be devoid of personal belief etc. it should be facts

    and to reinvent it is just an insult to the legacy of the people.

    1. Rod Marsden profile image87
      Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      well said alexandriaruthk!

  36. 0
    Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago

    Y'all can't talk 'bout bumpkins that way!
    Dontcha know that's hate speech?
    What are y'all thinking?? 
    wink

    1. Rod Marsden profile image87
      Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      We are thinking y'all should get a shovel and bury political correctness then stand by with a crucifix and a stake.

  37. Greek One profile image80
    Greek Oneposted 6 years ago

    the REAL problem is the kids!

    they are just plain dumb and stupid!

    1. Sab Oh profile image60
      Sab Ohposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Some of 'em sure are.

    2. mod2vint profile image67
      mod2vintposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Agreed, except they are not dumb and stupid. The kids are awful, mean, and to worried about the social aspect of things. Like lets dress like a thug, look like a gang banger, and see how out right mean we can be. Teachers, administrators, and the parents that give a crap cant have disciplinary control over the kids because OMG  it might be construed as freaking child abuse.

      1. Padrino profile image61
        Padrinoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        There are a lot of grades before the kids start worrying about peer pressure, I will agree that some parents are to blame for their twisted offspring, but the bigger problem is in the public school system!

        1. mod2vint profile image67
          mod2vintposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Yes, the public school system sucks, but every child has the same oportunity to learn in it as the other. It is what that child makes of it. But when the teacher has no control over the class room, and the kids know it, and can do nothing to the disruptive child than whats the point. They all join in and no one learns. If a child finds a certain area of study interesting its up to them to go above and beyound what the school system is required to teach to learn more. The thing is the kids don't want to.

          1. Padrino profile image61
            Padrinoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            The Teacher is not doing their job if they have lost control of the classroom, you can't blame kids for being kids. The Teacher is ill prepared to Teach and should therefore be fired, sorry, its just the way it is.

            1. mod2vint profile image67
              mod2vintposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              The kids have no fear! And your right the teachers are not prepared to face thirty thugs in a closed room with no one to get their back. I guess if it were me I would get fired and spend the next year on unemployment like so many others, that or be in jail for standing up to some little thug.

              1. Padrino profile image61
                Padrinoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Thirty Thugs in a classroom, eh, not even worth continuing.

              2. Rod Marsden profile image87
                Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                In Australia it is forty thugs to a class room but they don't get to play with guns.

        2. 0
          cosetteposted 6 years ago in reply to this




          my child is a product of the public school system and he got what i consider a good education. he started reading at 18 months of age...no one taught him that. he just started reading. i assume because we (his parents) read to him from a young age). the school system recognized that he was 'gifted' and offered him accelerated classes at a young age and allowed him to flourish. i got to know all of his teachers throughout his academic career and there was only one really bad teacher and she got reprimanded severely for terrorizing her first graders. but other than that, most of his teachers were involved and dedicated and demonstrated that they really knew my son and weren't just going through the motions. i would much rather have my child in a public school than a home school.

          1. Padrino profile image61
            Padrinoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Why not home school? According to you he started reading at 18 months, you must have been one hell of a teacher!

            1. 0
              cosetteposted 6 years ago in reply to this



              i read to him, and so did his father, when he was a baby, so i guess he absorbed it somehow.

              why not homeschool?

              well, for me, i don't think a child can get a complete academic training unless he goes through the education system. that is my opinion, and i certainly don't expect others to agree with it, 'k? smile

              1. Padrino profile image61
                Padrinoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                You mean the Public education system. I would bet if you home schooled your child you would give him a superior education than he received from the public school system. I also believe the graduation rates of Home Schooled children and those from private schools would obliterate those of the public schools.

                1. Pandoras Box profile image81
                  Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Isn't that kind of obvious? You're comparing a group of children generally given every advantage of parental interest and involvement to a mixed group coming from all different backgrounds. There aren't alot of troubled, low-income children in private schools or being home-schooled. 

                  In the end it isn't the schooling that makes a difference but the impact of the parents.

          2. Pandoras Box profile image81
            Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            I agree. To be fair if my children were forced to attend a school in a low income area that lacked adequate funding then I might feel compelled to pull them out, and certainly if it was a dangerous environment.

            Otherwise I feel that my children benefit from being exposed to different people and varying ways of doing things and various viewpoints. Sure it's not all good, but neither is reality.

            Most importantly, WE TALK!!! and about everything. But I am not so egotistical and close-minded as to think that others cannot contribute something worthwhile to my childrens' educations.

            It would no doubt surprise people to know that my son often attends a local church. He attends the youth group night as well as most weekends the Sunday service.

            He goes mostly because he has friends who attend, and he is quite capable of separating the wheat from the chaff in the teachings. Sometimes he says it was the same old same old, sometimes he comes home talking about something that was discussed or brought up in the sermon.

            So I have no sympathy for these fools in Texas afraid their children will be indoctrinated into lax values if they're exposed to the legacy of Thomas Jefferson.

            No let's get rid of the man who believed "all men are created equal" and replace him with Calvin who espoused unconditional election, otherwise known as free will doesn't exist and god sends people to hell for no reason whatsoever.

            1. 0
              Brenda Durhamposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              What do you mean?----Jefferson has a legacy of belief in God/Jesus.

              But hey, the doctrine of Calvin?----I don't EVEN wanna get started on that false doctrine!

              1. Pandoras Box profile image81
                Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                It seems Texas is ahead of you on Jefferson's religious beliefs. God -yes, more or less. Well, less than you certainly. Jesus -as a great teacher yes. As the virgin born son of a god and savior of the world -not so much.

              2. 60
                (Q)posted 6 years ago in reply to this

                " Thomas Jefferson believed that the ethical system of Jesus was the finest the world has ever seen. In compiling what has come to be called "The Jefferson Bible," he sought to separate those ethical teachings from the religious dogma and other supernatural elements that are intermixed in the account provided by the four Gospels. He presented these teachings, along with the essential events of the life of Jesus, in one continuous narrative."

                http://www.angelfire.com/co/JeffersonBible/

                1. 0
                  Madame Xposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  This is a fabulous book! smile

                  1. Ron Montgomery profile image61
                    Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    Too bad Texas wants it banned.

            2. 0
              cosetteposted 6 years ago in reply to this



              you raised many a good point; all of which i agree with - regular, honest communication and exposure to other ways of thinking, other values even, allow our children to grow and to keep from straying from the core values their parents teach them. it is when we try to keep them in tiny shrink-wrapped worlds that they fail to develop skills needed to not only survive in this big, crazy world, but thrive. there's nothing wrong with allowing them the freedom to make their own choices. i wouldn't want an obedient robot for a child..i would feel that i failed him in some way if that were the case sad





              oOo, now that makes them even tougher, no doubt... big_smile wink

          3. rebekahELLE profile image92
            rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            peer pressure begins as soon as a child begins school. it starts at the local preschool.

            1. Sab Oh profile image60
              Sab Ohposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              And?

            2. 0
              cosetteposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              omgsh hee hee you just made me visualize a bunch of baby thugs wearing leather jackets yikes big_smile

              1. mod2vint profile image67
                mod2vintposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                LOL--- don't forget the tatoos!

                1. rebekahELLE profile image92
                  rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  oh yes, very popular!! they are so excited to show them off.
                  wink

            3. Padrino profile image61
              Padrinoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              I have kids from the 3rd grade on up to High School, none of them were concerned what other kids thought until at least the 7th grade. My experience has been that you are not correct.

              1. rebekahELLE profile image92
                rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                your experience speaks for yourself and your children.

                I have enough experience to say what I said.

                it is up to the parents to help educate their children.

          4. Rod Marsden profile image87
            Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            In Australia if a teacher talks mean to a kid he or she can be in trouble. Little johnny might be punching some other kid's lights out but the teacher can't pull him away from the other kid or talk mean to him.

            1. Pandoras Box profile image81
              Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Can't break up a fight? That doesn't sound right..

              And define "talk mean to a student." That does sound right, frankly.

              1. Rod Marsden profile image87
                Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                If a teacher touches a student he's in trouble. When I was a kid a teacher would break up a fight by taking both students by the scruff of the neck and hauling them off to the principal. you simply can't do that any more. By talking mean I am saying talking stern. It could be considered verbal harrassment and that it a no-no.

                1. rebekahELLE profile image92
                  rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  a real 'touchy' subject... hmm

                  parents will tell you, 'do whatever you need to do', and then blame you for something you didn't do... or something their child fabricated.  best advice, don't touch them!

                2. Pandoras Box profile image81
                  Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  That's horrific. I can't understand the logic behind this. Did some school official go too far and get the county sued or something? This seems like a case of an extreme reaction to a rare incident ending up in a policy that leaves schools powerless to deal with violent students.

                  Is this law in effect outside of school? Are citizens required to ignore violence when they see it and just call the police? If a couple of guys see a woman being raped in an alley, are they not allowed to interfere if they feel capable of stopping it? What if a female student is being raped in a school bathroom? Are teachers not allowed to pull the attacker away from her? 

                  This sounds very extreme. And ridiculous. Why would any parent agree to send their children to schools that will not do everything possible to keep them safe?

                  1. Rod Marsden profile image87
                    Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    Protecting the rights of the individual against the rights of everyone else has gone too far. Kids basically know that they can get teachers into trouble quite easily and so push the line.

                    Right now in Australia if a parent is seen smacking their own child.s on thew behind for misbehaving in public they could be brought up on assault charges. Hence you have little children playing merry hell with parents in supermarkets and all the parent feels he or she is entitled to do is either reason with the kid to stop the bad behavior or bribe the kid to stop the bad behavior.

        3. Pandoras Box profile image81
          Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          I've never felt a need to beat my children.

          1. Rod Marsden profile image87
            Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Beating kids is just wrong.

            1. Rod Marsden profile image87
              Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Smacking the behind of a kid screaming its lungs out in a supermarket because he or she knows or thinks they know they can get away with it is another thing.  Discipline with care and restraint is a bit different from beating someone, anyone up.

      2. Padrino profile image61
        Padrinoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        They aren't stupid, they are being indoctrinated into believing stupid things, by, hold on, here it comes, Teachers!

        1. Greek One profile image80
          Greek Oneposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          and what were teachers once?

          stupid kids!

          see.. it all goes back to stupid kids!

          1. Padrino profile image61
            Padrinoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            No, regular kids who were indoctrinated, we could be doing this awhile.

        2. Sab Oh profile image60
          Sab Ohposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          "They aren't stupid"

          Oh, some them are.

          1. Padrino profile image61
            Padrinoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            I guess you're right.

        3. Rod Marsden profile image87
          Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Might makes right rules the classroom if teachers are not given the power to do something about it. You legally tie their hands together and expect them to teach? Good luck on that one!

        4. Pandoras Box profile image81
          Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          School teachers don't have that much influence over children.

          1. Rod Marsden profile image87
            Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            That is what I am saying and they should have some influence.

            1. Pandoras Box profile image81
              Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Haven't got time to go back and see what I said this is response to, (wish hubpages hadn't shortened the thread appearances in replies this way), so I'm just gonna wing it.

              If I recall right, I said this in response to someone who suggested that teachers were indoctrinating children with a liberal bias. My feeling is that what they hear at home is gonna have a much huger impact than what they hear at school.

              That said, whatever the slant at home may be, an unbiased education may provide the student a way to break free of parental prejudices and ignorance, should he or she choose to take it.

              A collective of historians is qualified to determine what gets printed in history text books, not a biased school board composed of dentists and realtors working from a religious and/or political agenda.

              1. Rod Marsden profile image87
                Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                History has to deal with as close as possible with past events as we understand them. If this does not happen then it really isn't history. It grieves me to know that some history teachers feel they don't have the time to cover Germany straight after WW1. They simply hand kids the cut down version of WW1 and WW2.

                In order to really understand how WW2 came about you really have to deal with the years between the wars, especially in Germany. Hitler didn't just come to power and the German people didn't just ditch a failing democracy for a dictatorship. 'Events happened that made the German people so desperate for order and three square meals a day that they let what the Nazis were doing to Jews, Gypsies and Communists slide.

                What other countries had done to Germany and the German people in the time between wars also pushed us into WW2. Yet in some classes in some schools they zip kids from one war straight into another and wonder why they are dumbfounded.

                Reasoned debate as to causes is also part of advanced history. If there is a bias you can't very well check out all historic proof for various arguments as to how things really did play out. You are stuck with one view only which may or may not be the right one.

                1. Pandoras Box profile image81
                  Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Yeah I totally agree. I was lucky though in that my father was a huge history buff. I generally knew more about stuff than many of my history teachers. It should be that way to some extent, your parents/elders should supplement your school education.

                  On the other hand, the best history teachers I had were ones who knew and loved their subject and were free to talk about it. We might miss alot of what was supposed to be covered, but what was covered we got. Not just the facts, the dates and names, but the forces and ideas behind the events.

                  A teacher who could spark your imagination on a single thing was worth far more than one who could cram meaningless facts into your head. But since the George Bush "No Child Left Behind" act, teachers no longer have the time to engage students in their subjects.

                  1. rebekahELLE profile image92
                    rebekahELLEposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    very true words. 

                    teachers, when they're able to really teach, can ignite a passion for learning that will only grow IF the child continues to be inspired, both at home and at school. parents are the first and best teachers when their role is taken seriously.

                  2. Rod Marsden profile image87
                    Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                    I remember a teacher got me interested in ancient Egypt. My dad got me interested in American history. He loves Westerns. He still collects the paperbacks.

                    1. Rod Marsden profile image87
                      Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                      Yes, Westerns in paperback form and the movies don't often touch upon the real west of the 1870s onwards. They are about the romance of the period. they are about 'a man's gotta do what a man's gotta do' and so on. Even so I got hooked when I started looking into the difference between how people want the west to have been and the reality. The Middle Ages is the same deal.

    3. mikelong profile image83
      mikelongposted 6 years ago

      So Texas is trying to move the Anglo form of God into the class while removing or minimizing Cesar Chavez.....interesting.

      1. Padrino profile image61
        Padrinoposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Cesar Chavez? Is he a God? A Texas hero? I fail to see why any kid anywhere should learn about Cesar Chavez.

    4. 0
      cosetteposted 6 years ago

      i wouldn't do it without help, that's for sure. we thought about putting him in a private school...even toured the place but it seemed too cloistered. anyway, we always helped him with his homework and examined what he was studying and were very involved, so we knew he was getting taught everything he should know, and more, over the years.

    5. Rod Marsden profile image87
      Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago

      The gently gently approach to teaching and learning doesn't always work. If the kid is thick or pig-headed they will not only ruin school for themselves but for heaps of others. Then in the USA when they leave school they get to play with guns. Heck some of 'em get to play with guns while in school.

      1. Pandoras Box profile image81
        Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        There's alot of room between gently gently and abusive.

        1. Rod Marsden profile image87
          Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

          Of course there is a lot of room between gently gently and abusive.

          1. Pandoras Box profile image81
            Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

            Yeah, agreed, so why anyone would advocate either extreme is beyond me.

            1. Rod Marsden profile image87
              Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

              Some people are dumb or have seen abusive happen and it scared them so they have pushed for the other extreme.

              There are people who still feel political correctness is the way to go. I have come across late teens that don't know how to verbally express themselves partly because of political correctness (they can't verbally offend anyone in public even if they have been verbally offended) so it all eventually spills over into violence. When questioned about violent activity they have nothing to say, they can't talk it out and possible come to better terms and understanding with others because they have an invisible politically correct zipper on their mouths.

              1. Pandoras Box profile image81
                Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                Huh. I don't know about that. I grew up with kids afraid to express themselves to authority figures because their lives were so different from others that they felt they'd be judged, but I don't think I've ever personally come across politically correct kids. Where I live most kids just echo their parents' ignorant rantings.

                1. Rod Marsden profile image87
                  Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

                  Australia and the UK have been playing around with political correctness a lot longer than the USA.

    6. mikelong profile image83
      mikelongposted 6 years ago

      Evidently, padrino, you fail to understand Chavez' relevance....

      He is a hero, just as Martin Luther King Jr. and Theodore Roosevelt....

      He's a significant figure in American labor...he is a symbol of how race in the workplace fell........

      But one would have to know of him in order to understand his worthy place, especially in Texas, where a great many Mexican-American agricutural workers are going to need such a role model...

      But, it is  Texas after all.....

    7. mikelong profile image83
      mikelongposted 6 years ago

      Let me clarify my statement further...

      The International Longshore and Warehouse Union, under the leadership of another national hero, Harry Bridges, reoriented its stance towards segregation in the workplace....and stood shoulder to shoulder with Cesar Chavez in order to stop President Nixon from sending free-market boycotted grapes to Vietnam...

      This move by Nixon is an example of a "bailout" by the government of big agriculture... There were no "Tea-baggers" running around...or cries that Nixon's appropriation of tax payer dollars would be used to settle a labor struggle unilaterally on the side of the growers....

      But people belittle or marginalize Chavez.....how interesting....

      What are these textbooks going to teach about Nixon, by the way?

      ALl of these themes intersect with the undermining of public education, at least in Los Angeles...the drive to privatize education...and then the new "teachers" can use whatever texts they wish....

      Private schooling is a good thing, but there should always be a public option......

      As with other things......

    8. Sab Oh profile image60
      Sab Ohposted 6 years ago

      Always back to unions again... roll

    9. RNMSN profile image91
      RNMSNposted 6 years ago

      history is written by the victors/it has already been edited/no one will ever know the TRUE atrocities done in the name of any higher power

      1. Rod Marsden profile image87
        Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        This is correct when it comes to much of history. From about 1865 onwards, however, this is not true about American history. The people who lived in the South and fought for the Southern cause did write their own history of events leading up to the civil war and even events directly after the war. In some cases their writing did see print so it is possible to see from the point of view of vanquished  as well as the victors.


        Knowing the true atrocities of any conflict is always problematical but I believe in the last three centuries we do have a better handle and a better take on what happens and what did happen. We do have a hell of a lot more first hand evidence to sift through for any major event. It is important to be able to do the sifting and to reach unbiased conclusions or as unbiased as it is possible to be since we are only human..

    10. Valerie F profile image61
      Valerie Fposted 6 years ago

      This is nuts. But then again, so was a lot of the "history" I was taught. For a long time, I honestly thought Galileo was put under house arrest for teaching that the solar system was heliocentric. Well, that was what all the textbooks said. No mention was made of the borderline libel he committed against his one-time friend the Pope- which happened to be the real reason he got into trouble.

      The fact is that a lot of history textbooks present a rather abbreviated, very simplistic, and one-sided view on various religions, and Texas' overcompensation will simply result in more of the same.

      1. Rod Marsden profile image87
        Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        You could be right. Galileo did push friendship too far. He thought he could get away with stuff by putting it into dialogue between what he claimed were fictional characters. Galileo had been pushing the envelope before hand too and that surely would have also been taken into account. The fact that he was right about his findings and his beliefs make up much that is presented to students today.

    11. Uninvited Writer profile image83
      Uninvited Writerposted 6 years ago

      Texas Explains Decision on History Textbooks
      Official Statement from Texas State Board of Education

      AUSTIN, TX (The Borowitz Report) – Attempting to explain its controversial decision to revamp its history textbooks, The Texas State Board of Education issued an official statement today.

      The one-sentence statement reads as follows: “If you were the state responsible for George W. Bush being elected President, you’d throw out your history books, too.”

      In other news, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said it had been difficult to get Republicans to vote for health care because of a “tactical error” by President Obama: “He should have called it ‘gun care.’”

      Elsewhere, employment numbers were up, largely due to the government’s decision to start counting people working on Farmville.

      1. Ron Montgomery profile image61
        Ron Montgomeryposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        lol

      2. Pandoras Box profile image81
        Pandoras Boxposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        lol

        Love it!

      3. earnestshub profile image87
        earnestshubposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Very droll! lol lol lol farmville you say? lol

    12. earnestshub profile image87
      earnestshubposted 6 years ago

      Nice post Ron. I have been keeping up to date with Egypt's ongoing discoveries, and would just like to say that to the best of my knowledge you are correct about the Egyptians who built the pyramids being workers with property and a good living for the time and place. Well said. smile

    13. earnestshub profile image87
      earnestshubposted 6 years ago

      This has turned in to a great thread full of useful informative and humour!

      What the hell went wrong? smile

      1. Rod Marsden profile image87
        Rod Marsdenposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        I admit it has been good. Just put me on the history trail and watch me go. There seem to be a few others here  who aren't too different from me in this regard. Pandoras Box and, I take it, you are of the same ilk. Always good to make contact with people who have both forms of wit on tap.

     
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