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Is there a reward for being wrong?

  1. Quilligrapher profile image90
    Quilligrapherposted 5 years ago

    If you are a believer or a non-believer, a creationist or an evolutionist, or an advocate for and against Obama then you should see this video on CNN.

    http://www.cnn.com/video/?/video/living … schulz.TED

    What would be your reaction if you discovered what you really believe is right is actually wrong?  Are you convinced there is no possibility you may be wrong? Is the unwillingness to admit the possibility you may be wrong preventing you from really learning what life is all about?

    1. earnestshub profile image87
      earnestshubposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      A great mind at work, I enjoyed the whole presentation, thank you Quilligrapher. smile

      1. Quilligrapher profile image90
        Quilligrapherposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        You are welcome, Earnest.  It explains why an open mind provides more room for knowledge then does a closed mind.

    2. kess profile image60
      kessposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      If you live thinking that it is possible that you maybe wrong on any or everything then you will always be wrong and perpetually ignorant.


      But if you Live knowing that you are able to see both beginning and end of any or everything then you will see and will know .. now you are full of knowledge and can never be wrong.

      1. Quilligrapher profile image90
        Quilligrapherposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Most people base their life choices and decisions on what they believe to be true. There is added wisdom, I think, in admitting to ones self that there is a possibility some things believed to be true may not be.

        1. kess profile image60
          kessposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Most people I know live their Live ignorant to the purpose for which they Live it.

          Wisdom comes with knowledge not ignorance.

          And "many"  is the only security of falsehood...

    3. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Well, I could be wrong (lol), and so would have to watch more of her stuff to make a better assessment, but just from that one video, the woman is.....practicing double-speak.   First, she tries to plant doubt in people's minds over and above the simple fact that we all already know we aren't always perfect in our initial perceptions.  Then, she uses that platform to implant a couple of political statements.  Or didn't you catch that little fact?


      My mother said it better and with more simplicity (and without a hidden agenda) when she said, as she realized alzheimer's was taking hold of her mind.  She said "you just never know what's gonna happen to ya".
      And alas, she hasn't gained a roomful of followers who shell out money to hear her say it.  Yet that woman has.

      Do you understand what I'm saying here?

      There is indeed something seriously wrong with society when people are entranced by a speaker who wants to play head games.
      And yes, apparently there is a reward.  She's making money off being wrong about a picture of a picnic table.   Lord have mercy!   In today's times, it's a well-known fact that all someone has to do is come up with some sort of gimmick that confuses people, and there's a potential reality star in the making.

      1. Bible Studies profile image81
        Bible Studiesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Very good observations.

        1. earnestshub profile image87
          earnestshubposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Just wondering... have either of you read her book on the subject? smile

          1. Bible Studies profile image81
            Bible Studiesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            First time I heard of her, and personally I didn't like her conference on CNN. I won't be watching any more of her stuff, or reading any books by her.

            1. earnestshub profile image87
              earnestshubposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              I didn't think so. smile

      2. Quilligrapher profile image90
        Quilligrapherposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        It is quite interesting how your ability to detect a hidden agenda and other obscure political statements serves to confirm the lecture’s premise that different minds perceive, assimilate, and interpret events and stimuli quite differently.

      3. profile image0
        jomineposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        "and there's a potential reality star in the making."

        Correction, you may also say a potential god in the making.

    4. profile image0
      Emile Rposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Excellent presentation.  Thanks for sharing the link. She put into words my entire philosophy on the topic. We can learn so much more when we don’t lose sight of the possibility that we may be wrong; instead of dogmatically clinging to the belief that we are right. I have never considered it doubt. More like fertilizing a supple mind. Nothing impedes the growth of knowledge more efficiently than inflexibility.

      1. Quilligrapher profile image90
        Quilligrapherposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        You are welcome, Emile.

    5. qwark profile image60
      qwarkposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Quill:

      Oh yes! The "reward is called "enlightenment."

      Humankind thrives because it makes mistakes and learns from them!

      The old adage of try and try again comes to mind. As does: "do it until ya get it right!"

      Of course there are those lesser evolved members of the human species that, regardless of the logic and reason involved in creating a dynamically, meaningful response, that may not prove they're wrong, but certainly offers a position to consider that might change their minds, will not even consider the thought or possibility of being "wrong."  ( I may be wrong...smile: )

      They, to my way of thinking, are not yet fully functional and are suffering from delayed intellectual growth. (I may be wrong...smile: )

      They are acting and reacting from a point of primitive fear.
      (I may be wrong...smile: )

      Their ability to think outside-the-box and accept reality has been, pitifully, frustrated by prior intellectual conditioning that has rendered them slaves to a world of naivety and self imposed ignorance. (I may be wrong...smile: )

      Being wrong is essential to human growth and progress.

      There is no doubt about that!

      The points the lady made on the TED presentation, were well thought out and presented...and to me? right!

      ...co course I may be wrong!   smile:

      Qwark

      1. Quilligrapher profile image90
        Quilligrapherposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Hey Qwark! Nice to see you. Great comments.
        But let’s not ignore the possibility that those lesser evolved, not fully functional, intellectual conditioned slaves, as you say, may just have insight and cognizance that you and I don’t possess. Then again, I may be wrong. I'm glad you liked the video clip. Have a great day.

        1. qwark profile image60
          qwarkposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Quill:
          I agree with ya!...but then I maybe wrong!
          I'm so confused...smile:
          Qwark

    6. dutchman1951 profile image61
      dutchman1951posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      most times the reward for being wrong is knowledge. The problem with this is by the time you find out,  your dead and cannot apply the knowledge to help yourself, or others.

      1. Quilligrapher profile image90
        Quilligrapherposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Hi Dutchman. I’m glad you added your opinion. You make a good point. Knowledge is one thing I can always use. But, do I really have to wait that long to learn which of my beliefs are wrong? smile Right or wrong, it seems to me, there is much to be learned just by being able to accept the possibility of error before I think I know for sure. This works for me. My mind can examine other conclusions without distortion caused by a personal or egocentric bias.

  2. psycheskinner profile image82
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    It would depend on whether the true situation was better for me or not.

    1. Castlepaloma profile image23
      Castlepalomaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I don't think there is a true right or wrong, only perspectives.

      Yes, I may go in one direction feeling sure of myself until something comes along and gives me doubt, then my mind over focuses on that doubt. It usually means I am not ready at that moment, try again later for a better answer. 

      I won many Sand sculpture World championship in  in a row and an TV interviewer ask me what is my top secret, I said, I must have made more mistakes than everyone else to get here. My competitors looked at me like I’m hiding some cat in the bag.

      It was the truest and most honest answer I could have given them. Fear not, in screwing up and be flexible, must be it.

      As far as each and every major religion being the right and only way to God. That many rights must make up for some serious wrongs, like the wizard of OZ hiding behind the curtain..

  3. Cagsil profile image62
    Cagsilposted 5 years ago

    Is there a reward for being wrong? Yes, it's called learning and experiencing. It's humbling to be wrong and it's a honor to be wrong. There is nothing wrong with being wrong, so long as it doesn't harm someone else. If it harmed someone else or self, then it is obvious that it was wrong to do.

    Edison, after 1000 attempts said he was not failing, but had found 1000 ways to not make it work/do something(filament). He learned and experienced failure, but never looked at it as failure.

    Just my thoughts. smile

    1. Quilligrapher profile image90
      Quilligrapherposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks, Cagsil, for your thoughts. We all reach conclusions or make choices and decisions based upon factors we believe to be true. Those willing to accept the possibility their conclusions may be wrong display the most wisdom.

      1. Cagsil profile image62
        Cagsilposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Just remember, the terms used, in the communication aspect is which creates the most problems.

        Example: from your statement- "possibility"? Yes, there is almost always a possibility that someone is wrong. That doesn't mean, they are wrong. When the probability of them being wrong is non-existent, then so is the possibility.

        Communication is the key to other people, not only understanding themselves.

        1. Quilligrapher profile image90
          Quilligrapherposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Hi Cagsil. You are so right. I certainly agree with you. There is almost always a possibility that someone is wrong but not everyone is willing to admit they might be wrong. The key word in my statement is not “possibility.” The key word is “willing.”  Within this context, it really doesn’t matter if the conclusions are right or wrong. The wisdom comes from being willing to accept either result as a possibility. Thanks so much for your input.

    2. earnestshub profile image87
      earnestshubposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I saw a notice in the hallway of my gkids school yesterday that said making mistakes is good, it is how we learn.

      They have these little notes around the school encouraging children to try, and when they are wrong or fail it is good because they can learn from it.

      Nothing wrong with making mistakes. smile

 
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