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The Word Selah. What does it mean?

  1. sassyk73 profile image79
    sassyk73posted 5 years ago

    It appears in the book of Psalm 71 times and a total of 74 times in the Bible. Is it a pause? Is it something like saying amen? Do anyone know what it means?

    1. heavenbound5511 profile image81
      heavenbound5511posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Meditate, think about.

      Have you ever read a scripture and thought on it and thought on it for maybe days or on and off for a time period- And than all of a sudden you get what it meant or you see there's even more meaning to it?
      This is meditating on the word.
      Meditating on the word of God causes revelation to come.

      1. sassyk73 profile image79
        sassyk73posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Thank you heavenbound5511 for answering my question. I agree with you on meditating on the word of God.

        1. psycheskinner profile image80
          psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I suspect the meaning of a word is better found in a text explaining its origin and meaning.  After all: God helps those who help themselves.

      2. heavenbound5511 profile image81
        heavenbound5511posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Joshua 1:8--This Book of the Law shall not depart from your mouth, but you shall meditate on it day and night, so that you may be careful to do according to all that is written in it. For then you will make your way prosperous, and then you will have good success.

        1. sassyk73 profile image79
          sassyk73posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Thank you. I am taking notes smile

    2. jacharless profile image80
      jacharlessposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I have been told by my Hebrew neighbors: the term used when playing instruments a lot. It generally means to exhale fully -letting go of all old and then breathing in the new. It also is respected as a breathing technique during meditation.

      James.

      smile

  2. dutchman1951 profile image60
    dutchman1951posted 5 years ago

    I do not know about all this other, but here is an explanation I looked up, if it helps:  From Wickpedia:

    "Selah (Hebrew: סֶלָה‎, also transliterated as selāh) is a word used frequently in the Hebrew Bible, often in the Psalms, and is a difficult concept to translate. (It should not be confused with the Hebrew word sela‘ (Hebrew: סֶלַע‎) which means "rock.")

    It is probably either a liturgico-musical mark or an instruction on the reading of the text, something like "stop and listen". "Selah" can also be used to indicate that there is to be a musical interlude at that point in the Psalm.[1] The Amplified Bible states Selah as "pause, and think of that".

    The Psalms were sung accompanied by musical instruments and there are references to this in many chapters. Thirty-one of the thirty-nine psalms with the caption "To the choir-master" include the word "Selah".

    Selah notes a break in the song and as such is similar in purpose to Amen in that it stresses the importance of the preceding passage. Alternatively, Selah may mean "forever", as it does in some places in the liturgy (notably the second to last blessing of the Amidah).

    Another interpretation claims that Selah comes from the primary Hebrew root word [calah] which means "to hang", and by implication to measure (weigh).[2] Also "Selah" is the name of a city from the time of David and Solomon.[3]

    1. sassyk73 profile image79
      sassyk73posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Thank you for the information dutchman1951.

      1. dutchman1951 profile image60
        dutchman1951posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        YW

  3. earnestshub profile image87
    earnestshubposted 5 years ago

    I believe the word originated as a term in music which meant to pause or wait. smile

    1. sassyk73 profile image79
      sassyk73posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Thank you earnestshub...that is what think it is too.

  4. K9keystrokes profile image93
    K9keystrokesposted 5 years ago

    My understanding of selah is that it is kind of an obscure Hebrew word found (you are right) in Psalms and in Habakkuk. "Selah" is usually translated as a synonym of "for evermore." It is somewhat used as a confirmation of a preceding phase or sentence; also used in musical transition from one choral piece to another in Congregational gatherings. Again, I emphasize 'obscure' Hebrew term...
    Hope this helps~

    1. sassyk73 profile image79
      sassyk73posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Thank you K9strokes. Your answer is very helpful.

      1. heavenbound5511 profile image81
        heavenbound5511posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I like the way you thank everyone for there input! Very nice smile

        1. sassyk73 profile image79
          sassyk73posted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Oh your welcome heavenbound5511. Thank you smile

  5. brotheryochanan profile image60
    brotheryochananposted 5 years ago

    contemporarily translated it means "think on these things". Meditate is a good word also but...

    Meditate has two distinct meanings. Transcendentalists use meditation by emptying their mind and focusing on something or to enter into a trance thereby.

    Meditate biblically used means to "think' about bible stuff", hence not emptying the mind nor going into a trance.

    1. heavenbound5511 profile image81
      heavenbound5511posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      you're right Brothery.

  6. sassyk73 profile image79
    sassyk73posted 5 years ago

    Thank you brotheryochanan. Your answer helps a lot. smile

  7. 59
    Brad Watsonposted 5 years ago

    The Wikipedia definition is good. "Selah" is a musical direction that probably meant for there to be an instrumental interlude between lyrics. This works well for when "selah" appears in David's songs, but this literal musical definition doesn't make much sense in the examples of "selah" outside Psalms.

    The op mentions that "'selah' occurs 74 times in the Bible". That is correct and it is a very important code! The combination of 7 & 4 is 'sacred geometry' and can be traced back to Genesis 7:4, "For in 7 days, it will rain for 40 days and nights". (This is the Bible's first usage of the recurring theme of #40.) The 4th Commandment "Keep the 7th day holy". An earthquake occured at Jericho when 7 priests with 7 horns marched around 7 times for 7 days. Moses did the #40 7x.

    The Hebrew Bible was written using 'gematria': an alphanumeric code that provides added symbolic meaning and connection between words with the same gematric code. The Greek New Testament was also written with the same alphanumeric code called 'isopsephy'. (The Arabic Qur'an was written using 'hasib al-jummal' - the same alphanumeric code.) 'Simple(6,74) English(7,74) Gematria(8,74) & GOD=7_4 puts a strong emphasis on Jesus=74 (J10+E5+S19+U21+S19), Jewish=74, Messiah=74, Cross=74, Gospel=74, according(74) to St.(74), pastor(74), etc.

    Selah is naturally connect(74)ed to composer(74), melody(74), and songs(74). Pretty cool, huh?

    - Brad Watson, Miami
    http://7seals.yuku.com

    1. sassyk73 profile image79
      sassyk73posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Wow....yes. Thank you Brad smile

    2. 59
      Brad Watsonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I need to correct two mistakes I made. "Selah" appears 3x in Habakkuk Chapter 3 which is a poem/song, so it makes perfect sense for a musicial term to be there.

      Also, gematria in Arabic is call 'hisab al-jummal'.

      - Brad Watson, Miami, FL

      google: Selah appears 74x in Bible, GOD=7_4

 
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