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The Prodigal Son - a different perspective

  1. Paraglider profile image90
    Paragliderposted 5 years ago

    My take on the prodigal son parable, from the point of view of the fatted calf (except that I've made it a fatted pig, just for fun)

    The Fatted Porker
    I liked the lad. He always had a smile,
    a whistle on his lips, and used to wait
    and watch us eat. Oh, you can call it swill
    but I'm not proud. For if it comes to that
    I've cracked the windfall, fresher from the moss
    than all your snow-cooled fare. I've savoured shoots
    that daylight never blessed. But let it pass -
    I liked him. He was generous with the oats.
    Not like his brother there, a walking blight
    on man and pig alike, his only care
    is his inheritance. I saw the hate
    spark in his eye. The young one's travelled far
    to find cold comfort from his kin. But still
    they'll come for me. I know which one I'd kill.

  2. RedElf profile image85
    RedElfposted 5 years ago

    Three cheers for the perspicacious pig! Paraglider, you have such a way with words. I hope one day you collect all your wonderful "bon mots" into a book or three -

    You never hear a blinking word about his mother, do you? Heaven alone knows how she felt about the whole business...

    A Mother's Tears
    I loved my sons, though one I favored more.
    He had his father's eyes, his ready laugh,
    that used to ring 'til work and always work
    took fearsome toll. And so, it came to pass...
    One son who tried to please, and one who left;
    one dark and staid, one brighter than the day;
    one born of love, one born of duty's hest -
    Two sides of parents' coin, two bookends, bound
    with careless love from one, from other, hate
    for ease and easy ways - his Abel's Cain.
    O, Absolom, my son, my heart-come-home!
    A mother's tears shall wash away all stain
    that ever marred your heart, or stung your eye -
    You are safe home, and that's enough for now.

    1. earnestshub profile image86
      earnestshubposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Truly beautiful. smile

  3. Paraglider profile image90
    Paragliderposted 5 years ago

    That's lovely, Elle. You've made me glad I posted mine smile
    You're right. The mother is never mentioned. But that's patriarchal religion for you!

    1. Inotherwords profile image82
      Inotherwordsposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I just wanted to thank both of you for sharing your poems.  You really have unique voices!  I just started on Hubpages the other day and haven't found many things inspiring.  This was definitely inspiring smile

      1. Paraglider profile image90
        Paragliderposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Thanks inotherwords, glad you enjoyed our efforts smile

  4. earnestshub profile image86
    earnestshubposted 5 years ago

    Very nice work Paraglider, now a most enjoyable read. smile

    1. Paraglider profile image90
      Paragliderposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Thanks Earnest smile

  5. Shalini Kagal profile image80
    Shalini Kagalposted 5 years ago

    Absolutely delightful! Loved them both!
    But my sympathy has always been with the older brother.


    A lazy, loafing gadabout was he
    From dawn till dusk he never worked – not he!
    And worse, when his hardworking brother toiled
    He laughed and sniggered, never did he soil
    His hands, so lily white with lack of work
    His clothes so spotless, ever did he shirk
    The smallest of the many tasks in store
    His mother fumed but she in silence bore
    Her sorrow as her first born to the bone
    Worked himself, without complaint or moan
    Then, when the lazy lout did up and out
    With his share, so undeserved, without a doubt
    A quiet Good Riddance was whispered o’er the farms 
    Till he came back, all spent, into his father’s arms.

  6. RedElf profile image85
    RedElfposted 5 years ago

    Way to go, Shalini! You have a lovely way with pentameter.
    ...and thanks so much David, I find your masterly wordsmithing truly inspiring! Earnest, and Inotherwords, thanks and blessings.

  7. Paraglider profile image90
    Paragliderposted 5 years ago

    Hi Shalini - nicely done smile  Now we've had the calf (ok, pig!), the mother, the older brother. Wonder who's next?

  8. profile image0
    Emile Rposted 5 years ago

    Wow. You guys really throw the hammer down on the prodigal son. He learned a hard lesson by his greed and selfishness. He was humbled by the unconditional love and forgiveness displayed by his father.

    His older brother learned the same lessons.

    The father loved them both, equally; and did not sit in judgment of how they used their inheritance. He was there for them when they needed him to be, let them choose their own paths; but made it clear that the  retribution for choosing poorly would not include the loss of his love.

    I always thought the prodigal son was more a reflection of humanity than the other son. My heart went out to him for how much fear he must have suffered on his journey home.

    1. Paraglider profile image90
      Paragliderposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Hi Emile - the story is pretty straightforward. We were just having a bit of poetic fun with some of the characters smile

      1. profile image0
        Emile Rposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Ok. I guess everyone's idea of fun is different.

        1. Paraglider profile image90
          Paragliderposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Hope so smile

          1. profile image0
            Emile Rposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            smile Sorry. I just feel for the guy. That would be my luck too. Remembered through posterity for one of my screw ups.

            1. Paraglider profile image90
              Paragliderposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Oh, I don't know - at the end of the day, he'd have had more stories to tell his grandkids than his brother would!

              1. profile image0
                Emile Rposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                I don't know about that. They were goat herders. Weren't they? I've owned goats and, I got to tell you, they are some of my favorite stories. Strange little creatures.

 
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