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What is the role of Christ in public education?

  1. davenmidtown profile image86
    davenmidtownposted 5 years ago

    This has always been a controversial subject, but what is the role of Christ in the public education system?  Does learning religious type material make a difference in children and their actions?  Should Christ and other religious material be banned from school programs?  Is there a place in public education for religion?

    1. Cagsil profile image60
      Cagsilposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      It doesn't play a role, because in America it's against the law to teach specifics other than generalized religion(the existence of religions).
      Yes, it teaches them the same things that the parents learn- do as I say, not as I do.
      It is already.
      Only in generalized format. No specific teachings.

      1. earnestshub profile image86
        earnestshubposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Yes, many of our Australian schools teach a little about all religions and the history comes up in standard history lessons.

        You can't teach one religion to kids who have every religion you can think of, someone would insist that only theirs had the truth.

        1. Cagsil profile image60
          Cagsilposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          That's why I said religion is taught in a generalized format. wink

          1. earnestshub profile image86
            earnestshubposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Glad to know that, I sometimes get the idea that American schools do teach religion in some places. Would that be true do you think?
            We have religious schools here, but most do not enforce religious instruction.

    2. 2besure profile image82
      2besureposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      It has not place in public education.  If it is a Christian private or Catholic school, that is expected. However, a Christian student has the right to share their faith with others in the public school they attend.

    3. 0
      Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      His Word should be the basis, actually, in public education.
      Yes, learning religious material makes a difference.
      No, basic Christian teachings shouldn't be banned from school programs.  Other religions' influence, yes, should be banned as far as feeding those to children. 
      The U.S. is case in point.  Over the years, the gradual but overt push to ban Christ's influence in our schools has finally led to the major controversies we're now going through in all aspects of American society, from moral decay to the economic problems we now face.   All those problems are tied inextricably together unless we fix the cracks in the foundation.  And I'm not advocating for a specific denomination;  I'm advocating for simple basic belief in and honor of the Biblical God the Creator.

      1. Cagsil profile image60
        Cagsilposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Are you really looking to destroy society?
        Oh yeah, learning a bunch of myths is valid for living. NOT!
        Lovely, you want to stunt people's learning ability. How nice of you. roll
        If people like yourself kept your religious beliefs out of other people's life, then there wouldn't be so much controversy.
        You actually are advocating for screwing things up more than they are already. Good show.

      2. wilderness profile image95
        wildernessposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Let's see here.  No other belief systems need apply as you know more than they do.  Somewhere I've picked up (perhaps wrongly?) that catholic beliefs won't be included, nor will Mormon or Witness concepts.  ONLY those Christian beliefs that you agree with shall be taught as real.  Yes, I know that you declare there will be no specific denomination, but I also seem to recall in past posts you declaring that particular Christian sects are not Christian.

        What is it, Brenda, that makes you so egotistical?  So arrogant as to proclaim that all of American should be taught your beliefs while ignoring any and all that are in conflict or different? 

        Thank goodness our founding fathers saw the conflict and insanity of such actions and declared that it not be allowed.

  2. psycheskinner profile image82
    psycheskinnerposted 5 years ago

    Public schools are not meant to teach religion due to the separation of church and state. Which is only logical as parents will come from all religions and none. You can't go teaching a kid that their parents religion is wrong.  What you can do is teach about religions without endorsing one over the other.

  3. davenmidtown profile image86
    davenmidtownposted 5 years ago

    How do you feel about teaching the historical context of religion?

    1. wilderness profile image95
      wildernessposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Will you go into just how the holy bible was written, and then changed?  Will you go over all the books left out and why?  Will you discuss the sexual abnormalities of the church VIPs that oversaw its production?  Will you teach how Christianity took up pagan holidays in order to make it more palatable to them and make their "conversion" easier?

      Will you discuss the crusades in detail, including reasons for them?  Will you also discuss Islam, buddism and wicca in the same manner?

    2. A Troubled Man profile image61
      A Troubled Manposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      It seems rather pointless to teach all that mythology in school as there are mountains of it that have accumulated over the centuries, and it would take up way too much of the school curriculum. Besides, what will they gain from learning it? Nada. Zip. Nothing.

      1. DoubleScorpion profile image85
        DoubleScorpionposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Teaching "mythology" as writing styles (similar to poems or authors) wouldn't bother me. Teaching belief systems about these mythologies on the other hand...that would be an issue.

        1. A Troubled Man profile image61
          A Troubled Manposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Me neither, but they should be electives in the school curriculum.

  4. wilderness profile image95
    wildernessposted 5 years ago

    Outside of a comparative religion class in the upper grades, none.  Nada, zero, zip.

  5. davenmidtown profile image86
    davenmidtownposted 5 years ago

    Hello earnestshub: There are private schools that do teach religion such as the catholic schools which can range from K-12 plus college.  But these are not public schools.

    1. earnestshub profile image86
      earnestshubposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Thank you. smile

      1. davenmidtown profile image86
        davenmidtownposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I must always question everything.  I feel like our public schools do such a bad job teaching children even the basics education.  I am curios how any of you think that can be corrected.  I am not suggesting teaching religion is the answer.

        1. lone77star profile image91
          lone77starposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Secular education can be improved by demanding more (expecting more).

          Many years ago a controlled study was performed with inner-city school kids. One teacher was told that they had an exceptional bunch of geniuses, but that they would try to do less unless challenged. Actually, they were an ordinary bunch of kids, and yet the teacher took them to academic heights in one year -- far above their wildest expectations.

          All on a simple belief. Think what could happen if we challenged our teachers and students.

          And that's only one technique.

          Look up Jaime Escalante about whom the movie "Stand and Deliver" was written. Pure inspiration, but his fellow teachers couldn't swallow enough of their own ego to get on board with his successes. He even won the Presidential award for best teacher. He taught poor, "know-nothing" potential drop-outs calculus. Yes, calculus.

          There is entirely too much ego in our school systems. Even many of the textbook writers are filled with their own self-importance -- especially those in the sciences and mathematics. Our third graders should be mastering calculus. Our first graders should be tackling algebra -- hot on the heals of multiplication tables.

          And what's this with grades? If a student is overwhelmed by a subject, they get left behind. All it might take is a few minutes to tutor them over the hump. A first grader who fails their first year is being deprived nearly 20% of their lives by this travesty of heartless bureaucracy. I say let the students learn at their own pace. Challenge them, yes, but tutor them if they don't get it. And all students get 100% or they re-study the material. I don't believe in studying something to be half-assed about it.

          Like me. I was overwhelmed in the reading circle, but bored to tears with math. This "one-size-fits-all" type of education is dinosaur mentality. And my first grade teacher did good. She took her own time and tutored me, one-on-one after class. I sent her a copy of my first published novel as a warm "thank you" for her unselfish gift.

          These are some of the things we can do.

        2. earnestshub profile image86
          earnestshubposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I have great empathy with anyone wanting better education. We are very fortunate with schools in Australia, but we have had to forego a lot to be where we are, close to the best schools in the State.
          We have given 12 years to the suburbs to achieve what we want for the kids. I am an inner city person and miss down town Melbourne where it all happens.

          The little I know of the schools in America is through the eyes of one dedicated teacher I spent an hour with. She was in tears of desperation when explaining what she and her fellow teachers had to cope with to get their jobs done, She had not even been paid regularly!
          I had hoped it would be better by now. America has so much to offer, but not everyone seems to be getting a good shot at the American dream anymore..... or am I painting too dark a picture?

          1. davenmidtown profile image86
            davenmidtownposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Most american public schools are pathetic.  They do not teach education anymore they teach students how to pass the government exams. My neighbors 13 year old can barley read.  How do they expect that children will grow up and be able to work at a quality job?

            1. earnestshub profile image86
              earnestshubposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              That's very sad. I wish some of the war money was going into education, but so many people depend on the military for employment, I can't see that winding down too fast with jobs so hard to get.
              Maybe they could turn all the military factories in to manufacturing plants for solar power or something? lol

              1. davenmidtown profile image86
                davenmidtownposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                was has always been our economic stabilizer.

                1. davenmidtown profile image86
                  davenmidtownposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  except now... it is/has destroyed our economy

                  1. earnestshub profile image86
                    earnestshubposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    Yes, Iraq and Afghanistan eat an enormous amount of fuel and resources.
                    I wonder what the price of fuel would be without feeding the war machine..... 20 cents a gallon? They MUST be using massive quantities of fuel. America has to find a replacement for the war machine soon as a domestic income earner.
                    It's net retainable sucks!. smile

  6. lone77star profile image91
    lone77starposted 5 years ago

    I wouldn't want Christianity taught in schools unless many forms of Christianity, plus Buddhism, Islam, Taoism, etc. were also taught.

    You see, I'm a Christian, but I don't believe some interpretations of the Bible. Some so-called Christians think they have it all figured out... like the Young Earth Creationists. Gotta tell you, Rick Perry in the White House gives me the creeps. I wouldn't want his brand of belief forced on kids any more than I'd want Scientology made the state religion. See what I mean?

    Separation of church and state is a good thing. It keeps things simple so that we can individually follow our hearts and souls in search of Christ.

    What Christ can do is be in our hearts when we help others -- tutor kids that are falling behind. Help teachers do a better job, etc.

    1. davenmidtown profile image86
      davenmidtownposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I think  you are both right... we certainly need to expect more from not only ourselves but from education.

 
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