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Obama and Christianity

  1. MikeNV profile image72
    MikeNVposted 5 years ago

    In 2009, speaking in Ankara Turkey, President Obama said, "We do not consider ourselves a Christian nation or a Jewish nation or a Muslim nation" anymore. Despite all the "In God We Trust" and the "one nation under God" stuff -- with the intimidation of the atheist left and the president's efforts to eliminate observance of anything spiritual, we Americans are well on our way to becoming nothing more than another vague collective of religiously oppressed "nation of citizens."

    Still, while Obama hasn't observed the National Day of Prayer once since he became president, he did take time to host his third White House Iftar dinner in 2010 to celebrate the Muslim holy month of Ramadan and pay homage to Muslim Americans lost on 9/11.

    "In this season of remembrance," the president said. "We must be the America they lived for and the America they died for, the America they sacrificed for."

    Here are other instances that underscore Obama's unwillingness to back Christians:

    * On the 10th anniversary of the attacks of September 11, prayer was banned at the official ceremony to honor the rest of America's dead.

    * In Egypt, the army opened fire and armored vehicles plowed through crowds of Coptic Christians who filled the streets in protest of recent attacks on their churches. Dozens were killed. Obama said nothing.

    * In northern Nigeria, 150 people were killed in a series of gun and bomb attacks on Saturday. The Islamist Boko Haram sect claimed responsibility. Obama said nothing.

    * In 2009 and in 2010, Obama celebrated Hanukkah at the White House.

    * This past April, Obama didn't even bother to send out the White House Easter proclamation to the nation, the liberal-loathed Fox News reported. But he did release an eight-paragraph statement heralding Earth Day and statements recognizing the observance of major Muslim holidays on Ramadan, Eid-ul-Fitr, Hajj, and Eid-ul-Adha.

    Now granted, such presidential holiday traditions are largely perfunctory gestures that only those celebrating that particular holiday really care about. But, hey, just as little kids like having their parents hang their latest macaroni artwork on the refrigerator with a magnet, Christians like having their president recognize their special moments too.

    But judging by his own track record, Obama evidently hates Christians -- and their holy days.

    1. Disappearinghead profile image88
      Disappearingheadposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      If your president is not a Christian, how can you expect him to observe Christian holidays and traditions? Of course they mean nothing to him. If he considers himself a Muslim they why be so surprised if he celebrates Islamic holidays and festivals?

      If you don't want a president who is a Muslim, don't vote for one. That's how democracy works; and why it is a system that is not supposed to grant special favours to any religious groups.

      1. MikeNV profile image72
        MikeNVposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        That's the whole point.  Obama Claims he is a Christian.

        At a backyard town hall in Albuquerque, NM, Tuesday, President Obama was asked “Why are you a Christian?” The question, from teacher’s assistant Elizabeth A. Murphy, 42, was one of three “hot topics” she raised with the president.

        “I’m a Christian by choice,” the president said. “My family didn’t — frankly, they weren’t folks who went to church every week.  And my mother was one of the most spiritual people I knew, but she didn’t raise me in the church.”

        1. MelissaBarrett profile image61
          MelissaBarrettposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I'm a Christian, but I don't really celebrate Easter either.  I would be upset about Christians being ran over by tanks, but I would also be upset about Muslims being ran over by tanks.  I too celebrate Earth day.  I don't celebrate Hanukkah but I know plenty of Christians that at least acknowledge the celebration and even buy gifts for their Jewish friends to celebrate the day.

          There are lots of kinds of Christians out there.  Believe it or not, some of them do things in their lives that are completely separate from their religions.  I know that to some, to be a real christian one must consult the bible before they use the potty or buy a car.  However, others are just as devout, but spend some portion of their lives NOT reading the bible.

          Basically, you are saying he doesn't support Christians because he doesn't think the same way as you.  I didn't realize that the "club" had gotten so specific...  Could someone please send me the rulebook?  I need Jesus's opinion to have to pick out a dress for our thanksgiving dinner...oh poop, I can't celebrate that holiday because it's not Christian, nevermind.

          1. A Troubled Man profile image60
            A Troubled Manposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Good one! lol



            The Bible is the rulebook, isn't it?

            Shouldn't it be consulted as to what dress you should wear or what car to buy? Isn't that the point of the Bible, a book to guide a Christians decision making process throughout their lives?

        2. Hollie Thomas profile image60
          Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Can you not accept that there are Christians that value other religions? That have a different view of Chrisianity than yours? You stated in an earlier thread that you were a member of the Green Party, so am I, I'm a tolerant Green party member, however.

          You really are quite egocentric. There's a common theme in all of your posts. Obama, Obama, Obama...... If he differs in any way to you, he is the hater, but not you. Shame really, when you suggested you were a green party member, I thought you might have something to say that was worth listening to. However, the more I read your posts, the more you sound like a Tea Party member.

    2. Paul Wingert profile image79
      Paul Wingertposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      In about 200 years, religion will a thing of the past in this country. Fine with me.

      1. pisean282311 profile image57
        pisean282311posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        exactly...only thing forward...

      2. profile image68
        paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        What are your basis of claiming it?

        Religion will remain as relevant or even more in the future.

        1. wilderness profile image93
          wildernessposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          What are your basis of claiming it?

          As Paul says, "In about 200 years, religion will a thing of the past in this country."

          1. profile image68
            paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Please mention the reference

            1. wilderness profile image93
              wildernessposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              The same as yours - from the depth of my mind.

              Please produce the evidence for your claim.  Real evidence, not words written thousands of years ago by people unable to distinguish reality from desire.

    3. DNCalkins profile image60
      DNCalkinsposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      "I almost shudder at the thought of alluding to the most fatal example of the abuses of grief which the history of mankind has preserved -- the Cross. Consider what calamities that engine of grief has produced!"
      -- John Adams, letter to Thomas Jefferson

      If you want to complain about anti-Christian presidents, you ought to start around 1776.

      Just sayin'.

      1. profile image68
        paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Cross is a symbol of persecution, torture and cruelty inflicted on Jesus

        1. DNCalkins profile image60
          DNCalkinsposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          There's a good chance that Adams (and I) was aware of the role of crosses in Christian mythology.  It's pretty obvious what he was trying to say.  But if crystal isn't clear enough for the point I was trying to make, I have a whole bevy of similar John Adams quotes that I could use instead, including the text of the Treaty of Tripoli, which he signed and makes some very explicit statements about what he saw as the religious character of the United States.

          What I'm saying is that most presidents have been privately religious and publicly secular.  Those who are loudly religious and claim that their religion influences policy (G.W. Bush and Jimmy Carter being recent examples) are the exception, not the rule.  The same goes for the loudly anti-religious, like Adams here.

          1. MelissaBarrett profile image61
            MelissaBarrettposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Adams wasn't anti-religious, he wasn't even anti-Christian.  The issue he (and Jefferson, to whom the quote was addressed)had was with the Mysticism that was involved...

            Consider them rational Christians. 

            Neither Adams nor Jefferson were "loudly anti-religious" but they certainly weren't evangelical Christians.  It wasn't really as rebellious as it sounds either.  Their ideas would largely be equivocal to conservative Christianity today... (minus the trinity doctrine and taking the bible literally) Which, of course, would have seemed liberal back then.

            1. DNCalkins profile image60
              DNCalkinsposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Excuse me, I misspoke.  It is incorrect to call Adams anti-religious.  But his belief that religion had no place in government or public policy very clear.

              I think it's equally incorrect to file Jefferson under any specific creed because he was...odd.

              The point I am and was trying to make is that President Obama not screeching his faith at every opportunity is not proof that he is a Muslim or that he is anti-Christianity as some people would have it.  It is normal for a president.  To do otherwise is the exception.

    4. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      I'm pretty sure it was a liberal newsman who quickly changed the rhetoric after Obama mentioned his "Muslim faith" in an interview, by asking him "You mean your Christian faith, right?"   Every time Obama outright reveals his true intentions, somebody jumps up and covers for him.  People have fallen all over themselves trying to make excuses for the man ever since even BEFORE he got into Office.  Nope he's not a Christian.  If he were, he wouldn't have mocked Evangelicals, nor any American Christians or our Faith, nor would he have insulted the Bible's words.  He has done all that.

      1. profile image68
        paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Do you think Obama is an atheist?

        1. profile image0
          Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I don't know.  I just know he speaks unChristian things.  He needs salvation.

          1. Ron Montgomery profile image59
            Ron Montgomeryposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            And you don't speak un-Christian things? 

            Pot/kettle

            1. profile image0
              Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Oh right. roll I'd much rather talk about me.
              But this thread is about Obama.  He probably needs the attention, ya know.

            2. profile image68
              paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              She is a good lady.

              1. profile image0
                Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Thank you paar!  That was nice of you.

                1. profile image68
                  paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Regards

              2. Ron Montgomery profile image59
                Ron Montgomeryposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Yes, she is.  For some reason though, she has a blind spot when it comes to her own hypocrisy.

          2. profile image68
            paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Every body needs salvation; as did Jesus and as does Brenda Durham.

            1. profile image0
              Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              I've accepted the Lord's free gift of salvation.
              Yes, I need ultimate salvation just like everyone does.
              Everyone except Jesus, that is.   Jesus IS the way to salvation.  He has no need of being "saved", because He IS the Savior.

              1. profile image68
                paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Jesus was not a saviour; he was a seeker after truth and only will be saved by the Creator God by His mercy whom Jesus used to name God-the-Father and prayed for His mercy, even on the Cross, so loudly, with tears in his eyes.

                1. profile image0
                  Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  I understand where you get that idea.
                  But (if you're interested in reconciling the terms Trinity and Salvation), there's info in the Bible about Jesus's divinity.  The book of John, first Chapter, clarifies who Jesus was and is.   Some of the things He did while here on earth were simply examples for the express benefit of mankind's understanding.
                  And those who really want to see, will see.  That's what I pray for for Obama to see someday.  It would rock his world and change his heart.

                  1. profile image68
                    paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    But John was John; he was not Jesus; and Jesus did not authorize John to write anything on his behalf; simply John's opinion, just like anybody else's. He made claims never giving any reasons. If he did mention a reason; please quote the issue and the reason both from him.

          3. profile image0
            Texasbetaposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            You write unChristian things. Who are you to claim someone is or is not a Christian? You display your lack of Christian principles every time you post.

            1. Captain Redbeard profile image60
              Captain Redbeardposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Who are you refering to? There are four different people above your post.

              1. Disappearinghead profile image88
                Disappearingheadposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                That'll be Brenda he's having a pop at.

                1. profile image0
                  Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  I'm so glad I'm in a good mood today.   So good, in fact, that Texasbeta's  personal insult doesn't even faze me. 
                  Actually, it's moreso because I have my Armor on.  Praise be to the Lord! smile

                  1. Captain Redbeard profile image60
                    Captain Redbeardposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    "like"

    5. Jeff Berndt profile image91
      Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      "In 2009, speaking in Ankara Turkey, President Obama said, "We do not consider ourselves a Christian nation "

      He probably said that because he's not a drooling idiot with no understanding of the Constitution or our nation's history.

      The US is not now, nor has it ever been, a "Christian Nation." It is now, and has always been, a nation with a Christian majority.

      There is an important distinction between the two, and we Christians would do well to remember it: Christianity may be the majority religion in the US, but that does not (or at least, should not) give Christianity some kind of privileged status in the United States.

      1. profile image68
        paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Who is in majority in America?The Catholic Religion or Protestant Religion or the rest of the Christians who hold that Catholics and Protestants are just cults; they are not the truthful Christians; they mean JWs and Mormons are the only true Christians.

        Are atheists in minority in America? Do they accept?

        1. Jeff Berndt profile image91
          Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Well, if you want to subdivide, you can subdivide all you like. There's Christians, and then there's the split between Catholics and Protestants, and then there's the various protestant sects (Lutheran, Anglican, Presbyterian, Baptist, Congregationalist, Quakers, Pentecostals, etc etc etc ad nauseam) Then there's the Mormons, who may or may not count at protestants in that they're Christians who aren't catholics, but many Protestants view the Mormons as a cult. Then there's the Jehovah's Witnesses as well, and they are Protestant-y, too, but a lot of other Christians also view them with suspicion. It's crazy.

          Emo Phillips told a story about trying to talk a guy out of jumping off a bridge.
          The guy said, "Nobody loves me."
          Emo said, "God loves you. Do you believe in God?"
          Guy: Yes.
          Emo: Me, too! Are you a Christian or a Jew or a Muslim?
          Guy: I'm a Christian.
          Emo: Me, too! Catholic or Protestant?
          Guy: Protestant.
          Emo: Me, too! What franchise?
          Guy: I'm a Baptist.
          Emo: Me, too! Northern Baptist or Southern Baptist?
          Guy: Northern.
          Emo: Me, too! Northern Conservative Baptist Great Lakes Region Council of 1879, or Northern Conservative Baptist Great Lakes Region Council of 1912?
          Guy: Northern Conservative Baptist Great Lakes Region Council of 1879.
          Emo: Die, Heretic!
          And he pushed him over the edge.

          Funny, right? smile

          Oh, and to answer your last question, yes, atheists are a tiny minority in the US, and one of the least trusted ones, if you go by polls.

          Some folks here have said that they wouldn't trust the word of a witness who refused to swear on the Bible on the grounds of atheism. I think that's astoundingly illogical. Who would you trust more: the person who held the book and said the words without thinking about it, or the guy who says, "No, I'm not going to pretend to believe in God, but I'll promise to tell the truth without swearing on something I don't believe in." Me, I'd trust the guy who is honest about his beliefs, especially knowing about the negative consequences of such an admission.

    6. 2besure profile image82
      2besureposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      America is not a Christian nation.  It is one nation of many faiths. The President is also the President of all those people, regardless of their faith, or lack thereof.  Many who claim to be Christian, don't practice the fruit of Christianity.  Observing a day a prayer is a great thing to do, but to live for God daily and to love the Lord and your neighbor as you self is the mark of a true believer, no merely observing one yearly event.

    7. mom101 profile image60
      mom101posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Mikenv, you are so right.

      People will wake up and I will tell you when. they will wake up on the morning of  too late. But what can we do?

  2. profile image0
    icountthetimesposted 5 years ago

    I don't think Obama hates Christians. I'm sure we could cherry pick examples of when he's been silent on lots of issues and mold that into meaning that he hates group x,y,z etc. I would however say that I don't think he's particulalrly religious. He has cultural tendancies towards Christianity but I doubt he literally believes that the bible is true.

    1. profile image68
      paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this
  3. profile image0
    Emile Rposted 5 years ago

    If Obama has slighted Christians, which I have never seen him do, I would be disappointed. All faiths should be given the same respect. But, if he has, I find it less offensive than Bush's statement that God wanted him to go to War.

    1. couturepopcafe profile image61
      couturepopcafeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      The big issue for me is that he has celebrated other religions' holy days in the White House but claims to be a Christian.  I don't care if wants to celebrate other traditions.  It's a reminder of how this nation came about.  But don't speak out of both sides of your mouth, Mr. President.

      1. pisean282311 profile image57
        pisean282311posted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Nothing wrong in president celebrating other faith's festival...president should be non bias as far as religion goes...

        1. profile image0
          icountthetimesposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I agree. Separation of church and state. He's there to lead the country, not endorse a religion. There is nothing wrong with celebrating other religions and points or view to appreciate and include all people.

          1. profile image68
            paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            sure

        2. profile image68
          paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I agree with you.

      2. profile image0
        Emile Rposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I suppose that is one way to look at it; but Christians are supposed to be accepting of others, considerate of others and courteous to others. I would assume those qualities would be acted out, in different ways, depending on one's station in life.

        My father, whom I consider an excellent Christian, never wears his faith on his shirt sleeve. You wouldn't know he was a Christian by his words. It's evident in his actions. But, to me, the actions are the mark of a Christian.

        1. profile image68
          paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          There is no harm if one is like Jesus in actions, morals and beliefs.

      3. Uninvited Writer profile image82
        Uninvited Writerposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        As did his predecessor. He observed Ramadan in the White House he observed Hanukah in the White House The president is everyones president...


        And not all Christian's are born again fanatics.

        1. couturepopcafe profile image61
          couturepopcafeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I'm not sure if you're all agreeing here or not.  I think the point is that he celebrates other religions but not his own.  Huh?  I'm not sure I get it.

          1. MelissaBarrett profile image61
            MelissaBarrettposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            I'm pretty sure the white house celebrates Christmas.  You miss the basic principle.  He's showing respect for cultural and religious diversity.

            The U.S. would be a lot better if more people could do the same thing.

            1. WD Curry 111 profile image61
              WD Curry 111posted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Hello?!

  4. MelissaBarrett profile image61
    MelissaBarrettposted 5 years ago

    He needs economics lessons, other than that I'm pretty okay with his viewpoints...  Now I can't think of any of the republicans that they are offering up that couldn't use a little more Jesus and a little less religion.

    1. profile image0
      Brenda Durhamposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Michelle Bachmann's got her priorities straight.  Given the opportunity, I think it's very possible she could turn this Nation around, starting with repealing Obamacare (for just one example).

      1. MelissaBarrett profile image61
        MelissaBarrettposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        To me, any possible improvement she might make by hiring out economic experts would be far outweighed by the damage she would do to individual freedoms. 

        I don't necessarily agree with Obamacare, but the arguments are in the specifics not the idea.  I don't mind the idea of socialized medicine.  Obama is doing it wrong in a few places though.

        But it's moot anyway, Bachman doesn't have a chance.  And, I am being 100 percent honest, if she did get elected, I would marry my best friend in Canada and move my children there.

      2. Jeff Berndt profile image91
        Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Michelle Bachmann is a complete idiot. She thinks the Founders worked tirelessly to abolish slavery, for example. She's a fool. Worse, she's a fool who thinks God talks to her and tells her what to do. If she is elected president, this nation is doomed.

  5. Hollie Thomas profile image60
    Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago

    He does talk to her, his new name is Koch.

    1. Jeff Berndt profile image91
      Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      big_smile

 
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