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Taliban stoned and shot 2 women for adultery...

  1. aka-dj profile image78
    aka-djposted 5 years ago

    How cone no-one is talking about this?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-15688354

    This is Sharia law at work, PROVING to the world how "merciful" Allah is,
    and how women are considered equal, or should I say valued.

    I invite my Muslim hubbers to justify this. PLEASE show us how this is GOOD, and ACCEPTABLE behaviour.

    I can hardly wait! cool

    1. A Troubled Man profile image60
      A Troubled Manposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Perhaps, you should be adding the relative bits...

      "Look everyone, these guys are committing similar atrocities my religions followers committed in the name of their God, please show us how this is GOOD, and ACCEPTABLE behavior." lol

    2. profile image68
      paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      This is doing of the terrorists; what it has to do with Quran/Islam/Muhammad; they never gave any such teaching.

      Stoning and killing is from the Bible; not from Quran.

      1. aka-dj profile image78
        aka-djposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Taliban live from Koran ,NOT the Bible.

        They are Muslim, NOT Christian. (Just in case you didn't know that).

        1. profile image68
          paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Should I quote Bible for killing and stoning; the root source of Christians and Jews?

          1. aka-dj profile image78
            aka-djposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            First of all, I'm aware of the fact that it's in the Bible.
            It is, however NOT a command for Christians.
            Second, the Jews don't practice it today. You may want to address one (Jew) about how and why that is!

            Besides that, you didn't answer my point.

            The Taliban don't live by the Bible teaching, but Koran!!!

            1. profile image68
              paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              They commit atrocities by themselves; they don't live by Bible and Quran or reason; they live by terrorism.

              1. aka-dj profile image78
                aka-djposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                I bet if you posed this accusation at them, they would kill you, too.
                They would use the Koran to justify their actions for that too.

              2. Paraglider profile image88
                Paragliderposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                That is largely true. The level of literacy in Afghanistan is very low and among the Taliban lower still, by a long way. They live by superstition, fear and oppression. Having said that, there are many uneducated, barely literate, societies that still manage to refrain from such barbarity. There is no excuse or justification for the foul acts committed by Taliban.

            2. Jeff Berndt profile image93
              Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              "[Stoning] is, however NOT a command for Christians. "
              Really?

              “Do not think that I came to destroy the Law or the Prophets. I did not come to destroy but to fulfill. For assuredly, I say to you, till heaven and earth pass away, one jot or one tittle will by no means pass from the law till all is fulfilled. Whoever therefore breaks one of the least of these commandments, and teaches men so, shall be called least in the kingdom of heaven; but whoever does and teaches them, he shall be called great in the kingdom of heaven."
              Matthew 5:17-19

              Well, at least you'll be in the kingdom of Heaven, even if you'll be picking up dog poop off the clouds. smile

              1. aka-dj profile image78
                aka-djposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Yes, really!

                How about this one, then;
                John 8:3 And the scribes and Pharisees brought unto him a woman taken in adultery; and when they had set her in the midst,
                4 They say unto him, Master, this woman was taken in adultery, in the very act.
                5 Now Moses in the law commanded us, that such should be stoned: but what sayest thou?
                6 This they said, tempting him, that they might have to accuse him. But Jesus stooped down, and with his finger wrote on the ground, as though he heard them not.
                7 So when they continued asking him, he lifted up himself, and said unto them, He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone at her.
                8 And again he stooped down, and wrote on the ground.
                9 And they which heard it, being convicted by their own conscience, went out one by one, beginning at the eldest, even unto the last: and Jesus was left alone, and the woman standing in the midst.
                10 When Jesus had lifted up himself, and saw none but the woman, he said unto her, Woman, where are those thine accusers? hath no man condemned thee?
                11 She said, No man, Lord. And Jesus said unto her, Neither do I condemn thee: go, and sin no more.
                Jesus FULFILLED the Law.
                What a stupid comment from a seemingly intelligent antagonist. tongue to you for saying it.

                1. Jeff Berndt profile image93
                  Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  If there'd been a dude without sin in that crowd, that lady woulda got a bunch of rocks thrown at her. smile

                  "Jesus FULFILLED the Law."

                  "For verily I say unto you, Till heaven and earth pass, one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law, till all be fulfilled."
                  Matthew 5:18

                  So, am I right in concluding that you believe "all [is] fulfilled" at this time?

                  Thank you for the compliment, btw. smile

                  1. aka-dj profile image78
                    aka-djposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    That was Jesus' point, there were NONE there without sin, except Jesus, and He was not throwing stones! Yes He did!

                    This still stands today.

                    No, you would not be correct.
                    Jesus fulfilled the righteous requirements of the law, so we don't have to. (We live by faith, in His grace). The quote you gave is for all of scripture to be fulfilled, which clearly is not yet.


                    Thank you for the condescension. sad

          2. nightwork4 profile image60
            nightwork4posted 5 years ago in reply to this

            it doesn't matter what the root source is, what matters is who does it. christians don't and muslims do. stoning, honor killing etc. say or show whatever you want, facts are facts.

            1. kirstenblog profile image78
              kirstenblogposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              I am not sure this matters to someone who embraces a culture that blames the woman wearing sexy clothing for getting herself raped, instead of holding the rapist responsible for his actions. Always looking for an excuse by re-assigning the blame to remain the 'truthful and peaceful' religion, lol roll

    3. profile image0
      Virgil Newsomeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      One thing I noticed when I checked the article is that one reason was because of adultery.  Further down the article we find out that the woman was a widow.  Adultery is done by a person who has a spouse.  Fornication is done by those who are unmarried. 

      They killed one woman because she was accused of murder.  Not trial, no investigation and most likely not even a chance to say anything in her defense.

      Adultery is generally done in private.  How can anyone actually be a witness to such things unless they like to watch and condemn their own selves?

    4. profile image0
      darknight444posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      i question that taliban have the autority to excute shaira thy have e huge probleme of ignorance

      1. aka-dj profile image78
        aka-djposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Go ahead, be my guest. go to Afghanistan and question them!

        You are surely in no danger. You are also Muslim like them, so they should receive you with open arms.
        They might even listen to you and change their ways.

        That would be a lot better for everyone, because there would be no need for a continued war to stop these guys.

        Let me know how it works out.

    5. profile image0
      darknight444posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      pls all of you you canot blame islam because it still keep the rulling of god

      see thise : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stoning

      1. kirstenblog profile image78
        kirstenblogposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I am sorry but I can and will blame Islam, so long as you do nothing to stop those who disgrace Islam with rape and murder in the name of Allah. As a Muslim they disgrace you too. As long as you sing the praises of Islam all the while turning a blind eye to rape and murder, you make yourself as bad as those who commit rape and murder in the name of Islam and Allah. I hold chirstianity to the same standars, both religions being built on the foundations of murder. No matter how nicely you dress the houses of these churches, a evil and bloody foundation will always make those religions stink of death and decay.

        Does not the Quran say:
        Don't bother warning the disbelievers. Allah has made it impossible for them to believe so that he can torture them forever after they die. 2:6-7

        Sounds like God wants playthings to torture, what an evil god!!!!

        1. Jeff Berndt profile image93
          Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          "I am sorry but I can and will blame Islam, so long as you do nothing to stop those who disgrace Islam with rape and murder in the name of Allah."
          So, if that particular Muslim didn't personally do anything to stop the terrorists from being terrorists, all of Islam is at fault? Okay.

          So I guess since I didn't personally do anything to stop fundamentalist Christians from  bombing abortion clinics, shooting doctors, and setting a guy on fire, then all of Christianity is to blame. That's cool.

          I mean, as long as you're willing to apply the same standard to each religion, it's all good.

          1. kirstenblog profile image78
            kirstenblogposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Oh I do, I think it is a mistake to align ourselves with religions of any sorts because we cannot ever control what others do and every religion to ever exist has given power to some over the others. To accept and join a group that gives power and/or authority over others means that the responsibility has to be shared. No flock means no priest fiddling the kids. Sure the sicko's will look for other ways to abuse but at least we haven't made it easy for them.

            I cannot join any group that has had its teachings and values used to justify war, murder, rape or any other crime. I have yet to find a religion that hasn't been easily corrupted. I just don't think you can join a group and then disavow yourself from any responsibility for what that group does. I am not in the majority with this belief I know. I have known many good and decent people from both Christianity and Islam. To me they are good people but I struggle to understand how they could stand to be associated with the various crimes of either religion. It is beyond me really. I guess I just hold myself to a very high standard. Not fair to hold others to the standards I hold myself, I know my strength but do not know the strength of a single other person with any accuracy or authority.

            1. Jeff Berndt profile image93
              Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              "I just don't think you can join a group and then disavow yourself from any responsibility for what that group does."
              I dunno about that. I mean, I was a Tigers fan in 1984, and I really don't think I have any responsibility for the riot after they won the world series (I was 12 at the time).

              Now, understand that I take being a Christian more seriously than I took being a Tigers fan, but my being a Christian has about the same effect on Christianity in general as my being a Tigers fan had on the outcome of the '84 World Series. (I don't go to church, I don't tithe to a church, etc).

              Am I still responsible for the barbaric actions of other people who also claim to be Tigers fa--oops, I mean Christians?

              1. kirstenblog profile image78
                kirstenblogposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                To start out with for that particular riot you were a child so you get off on that one lol wink
                I don't care for the influence that competitive sports has had on society, I think that is actually worse then the riots that have happened. I find it sick that grown men complain that their not earning enough when they are earning millions. I know it can be dangerous, in that an injury could end a career but boo hoo. Playing games shouldn't be considered a career in the first place. Back in the day sportsmen had to have real jobs too, it sorta made them more respectable. Too watch a game isn't the same as worshiping sports (and society today could be said to worship sports). Far as I can see, watching a game or two with friends and nibbles is not unlike trying to be a good person in relation to religion (as being a good person is to religion, so to is watching a game for fun to sports). Now if your gonna tell me that your team is better then mine, yes you might as well pick up a crow bar and start rioting right now as far as I am concerned. By the way, I don't have a preferred team any more then I do religion (with one exception, the kids at the school where I work, because I know them personally).

            2. Jerami profile image78
              Jeramiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              kirstenblog;I cannot join any group that has had its teachings and values used to justify war, murder, rape or any other crime.

              ===================

                So would you say that you a nonconformists?

                Which makes you a member of that group whether you go to the meetings or not?

                We are All members of one ideology or another. The human race is but one group here on earth, and we all have some responsibility for is actions.   But, does any one person have to carry the whole burden alone?

                The more we try to be different than the rest...  the more we become the same.

                Hope we all find peace or what ever else it is that we are looking for.

                The quicker we discover what it is that we are all looking for .. .. the sooner we MAY find it.

              1. kirstenblog profile image78
                kirstenblogposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Not really, I was a girl scout back in the day (ahh the god old days LOL). Don't think girl scouts have ever started a war, or committed rape or murder, or anything more then selling yummy fattening cookies tongue

                Point is, I wont join a group that is so easily corrupted that it has been used to justify criminal acts. I am happy to join groups that don't distribute power and authority to some over others. Sure the girl scouts have an adult leader but that is not a peer in power but someone who in theory has earned the right to the respect of authority (in those cases where pedo's have abused kids in scouts, that is not the fault of scouts, thats just criminals looking to commit sick crimes). If the scouts put one kid over others, I would run like the wind to get away from that.

                1. Jerami profile image78
                  Jeramiposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Thanks for taking my post in the context that was intended.

                     Was just attempting to say that we all do fit into one mold or another intentional or not.

                     Fact is many of "THEM" "BAD" people look for a group to hide in, even though they are easy to see, ...  they hide amongst the herd.

                    And every group has some of these.

                    In some ways, religion has been constructed kinda like a house of mirrors.

                    If it were easy,it wouldn't be any fun working our way through it.

                    Have you ever been through the house of mirrors? Just to find the entrance and do it again.

                    If we spend too much of our time doing that ...  we miss out on the roller coaster.   HMmmm ?
                   

                      Sorry ...  looked in the mirror and lost my train of thought ... OH well?

                  1. kirstenblog profile image78
                    kirstenblogposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    I really enjoyed our conversation big_smile
                    It was nice to chat in real terms, not the usual I'm right and your wrong thing. It was nice to be asked about an aspect of what I believe in solid terms I could respond to. You and I may not agree on issues of responsibility of the group by the group as a whole when talking about groups like religions (or political for that matter!) groups but it wasn't a who is right and who is wrong conversation. You were trying to challenge my beliefs and that is a good thing, it means I can explore my own beliefs more deeply, always a good thing! big_smile

                    I do like your house of mirrors analogy, I have found things/teachings in every religion I have studied that I have admired and found value in and I have found perverse teachings as well and find that very much of a house of mirrors thing. If you want  to find good in a religion (any) you can, it's easy in most cases and chances are you will be a good person no matter which religion (if any) that you are brought up with or embrace some other way. So much seems to come down to what we want, what sort of person do we want to be? Not really an issue of what you believe so much as how you live tho, don't you think?

                    I don't know if there is a God or not. I do think that space is infinite and as such there are an infinite number of possibilities that have to be being played out somewhere (multiple big bangs and all that), if so then the fact that a God could be a possibility would mean that somewhere the possibility exists as reality. So lets assume a God does exist, does it really care what we believe over how we live? It just doesn't make sense to me. It makes a lot more sense that any God or Gods that may exist, they are unlikely to interfere with our beliefs because of how those bad apples will abuse that interference to wicked ends. It seems better not to give us any more tools for our own destruction then we already have lol. It seems more likely that we are here to live our lives, make our choices and hopefully learn our lessons when we make poor choices and maybe even become better so we can say we lived a good life. To be honest, thats good enough for me smile

    6. Don W profile image83
      Don Wposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Muslims on this very thread have said they cannot justify this with Islam. The article says "The police said two men had been arrested in connection with the murder". So local authorities (also Muslims) are treating it as a crime. That's hardly justifying it. 

      Two lives have been lost. It's a tragedy. Anyone who values life would surely consider it so. Should the deaths of these women be used to score a few points in the Christianity vs. Islam debate, or is that unspeakably crass? I wonder.

      1. Hollie Thomas profile image61
        Hollie Thomasposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        +1

    7. firdousi0 profile image52
      firdousi0posted 5 years ago in reply to this

      This is not Islam. This is so-called Mullaiat, which is opposed by the main Muslim scholars like Iqbal. If we consider Islamic law regarding adultery, it is almost impossible to convict anyone on the basis of evidence, unless it is a perfect confession.

    8. 2besure profile image82
      2besureposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      This is horrible and a part of their laws and culture.  I can not imagine knowing the consequences for adultery, why on earth a women would risk it.

      Like the women caught in the act of adultery in the bible, the men are nowhere to be found and the women are left condemned!  So not fair.

    9. Gordon Hamilton profile image96
      Gordon Hamiltonposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Hmmm... I wish I knew where my ex was living these days that I could pass on her address...

    10. profile image60
      maniqposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      source of information:?
      bcc, cnn, reuters ?!.. control freaks.?!?

      taliban:?? heros for US till late 90's when they knew now they are going to be a problem for us.. they give them weapons, money  etc etc.. and now the results are humiliating and it becomes a part of this whole news media crap. controlled again?

      1. profile image0
        Emile Rposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I can guarantee you that if you gave me guns and money I wouldn't use them to terrorize the local population.

        Call me somewhat off balance for asking, but do you consider personal accountability a virtue, or a vice?

    11. Don W profile image83
      Don Wposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Personally I find your focus disgustingly myopic. Why aren't you looking at examples of brutal injustice in so-called 'civilised' countries too?

      What about Marvin Wilson who was medically diagnosed as mentally retarded. He was executed by the state of Texas this August.

      What about Kelly Thomas, a homeless man who was fatally beaten by officers from the Fullerton Police Department in 2011. He was beaten to death in the street. All captured on video (his cries for his father during the ordeal are heartbreaking. Do not watch if you are easily upset).

      What about Cameron Mulrunji Doomadgee, an Aborigine who died in Australia 1 hour after entering police custody. Cause of death: abdominal haemorrhage caused by a ruptured liver.

      That's just three examples. Where are your comments about the brutality of U.S. and Australian society? More examples can be found elsewhere. Where is your thread asking for these incidents to be justified? Or are you only interested in brutality in Islamic countries? Why might that be? There is plenty of state sanctioned brutality in non Islamic countries too. Don't you think all such brutality should be highlighted and condemned? Or do you only condemn brutality when it is committed in Islamic countries?

      How dare you use the death of two women to score points in your silly religious competition. And how crass to end such a post with a smiley. Is it amusing to you? Your short-sightedness is only outweighed by your lack sensitivity. What a wonderful display of 'Christianity'.

      1. ARSHAD MAJID profile image79
        ARSHAD MAJIDposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Awesome reply...Don W-- The stains on others' clothes look bigger all the time.

        Here is some info from the rape page over Wikipedia-- but nobody is worried about what is going in the backyard.

        According to United States Department of Justice document Criminal Victimization in the United States, there were overall 191,670 victims of rape or sexual assault reported in 2005.[24]---- 1 of 6 U.S. women and 1 of 33 U.S. men have experienced an attempted or completed rape.

        According to a news report on BBC One presented in 12 November 2007, there were 85,000 women raped in the UK in the previous year, equating to about 230 cases every day.

        1. aka-dj profile image78
          aka-djposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Rape is hardly a topic I touched here, but it's not legal in either the US, or UK, or in Au for that matter.

          Unlike in the topic of the OP, we don't kill rapists for raping women. Do we?

          So, why should two (possibly innocent) women be killed for being victims of male dominance under sharia law?

          1. ARSHAD MAJID profile image79
            ARSHAD MAJIDposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            aka-dj-- well; lets accept that no one is perfect. And by the way as I explained before.

            Shariah Law has both schools of thought; one sticks to the Quran (hundred lashes) and the other thinks that for married people, the punishment of adultery is stoning-- as per their interpretations of some Hadith, as well as Old Testament. Lets not forget that Old Testament Rule was the active Shariah in Islam, before the Quranic instructions arrived. And Quran changed many like stoning with hundred lashes and left many like circumcision, religious slaughter etc. in its original form.

            Anyways; in case of adultery; both schools of thought follow the Quranic requirement of four witnesses, in case of extra marital sex that is with the consent of both-- before a punishment can be awarded.  And Islam is very tough on perjury and the punishment of perjury is same as that of the crime they accuse.  Moreover, the person committing perjury is not allowed to stand as witness again in his life in any court of law.  So, that nobody could dare to commit perjury in a Shariah Court.

            That literally makes it next to impossible for someone to be given the punishment by a Shariah Court. And that is the reason why we don't see many such cases coming, even from where Shariah is in practice. The punishment was meant to work like a deterrent so, that the people stay away from this act, considered in Islam and many other religions, as prohibited.
             
            I hope managed to explain the view of Shariah of Islam.

      2. aka-dj profile image78
        aka-djposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        My OP ia as follows.
        "This is Sharia law at work, PROVING to the world how "merciful" Allah is,
        and how women are considered equal, or should I say valued.

        I invite my Muslim hubbers to justify this. PLEASE show us how this is GOOD, and ACCEPTABLE behaviour."

        I'm glad you raised the injustice toward women, (and other vulnerable people). I am against any form of injustice, no matter where. You accusations of me are very blinkered and narrow minded.
        Please do your part to raise awareness of whatever you are disgusted by instead of shooting cheep shots at me.

        If you note my OP, I simply wanted to highlight the behaviour as being "legal" under sharia law.
        However, I deplore such legality, as do you, (obviously) and I'm glad that it's outlawed in most western countries.

        1. Disappearinghead profile image89
          Disappearingheadposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          According to Mosaic law the penalty for adultery was death by stoning. How is this different from Shariah law?

          Look at Christian societies 500 years ago and the brutalisation of humanity in the name of religion was little different, and was justified by the Church and state using the bible. In Africa today (and occasionally in the UK), children are repeatedly beaten and murdered because their parents believe they are posssed by devils. Just accept the fact that some societies are a few hundred years behind civilisation.

          1. aka-dj profile image78
            aka-djposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Are we talking about today? Are we talking about today?Is this legal?

            1. Disappearinghead profile image89
              Disappearingheadposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Which bit?

              But whether we are talking today or 500 years ago or 2500 years ago is largely irrelevant. The same punishment in Sharia law is found in Mosaic law. Do you think yourself morally superior because the society you live in no longer follows Mosaic law?

        2. Don W profile image83
          Don Wposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Rubbish. Your intention for this thread is to incite hatred of another religious group. Your attempts to hide that intention beneath a veil of outrage over the deaths of two women is crude and dishonest. The smiley face at the end of your post betrays the real extent of your concern. You saw this as an opportunity to attack another religion, and you took it.

          And your invitation to Muslim Hubbers to justify the death of these women is disrespectful and offensive. It betrays your small-minded prejudice. You can't even conceive of the idea that a Muslim may be as appalled by this event as you.

          You say you're against injustice anywhere, yet you only feel moved to start a thread about injustice in an Islamic country. Why is your outrage so selective? You say you want to highlight that this behaviour is legal under sharia law. Doesn't the state sanctioned brutality committed by authorities in the U.S., Europe, Australia, Russia against the general populous need highlighting too, or do you only 'deplore' brutality in Islamic countries? Here's what I deploy. I deploy people who use tragic events to incite religious hatred and further their own religious agenda, and who do so while pretending they are concerned about injustice. A smiley face with sunglasses is a very strange way to demonstrate concern. It's utterly grotesque. Make no mistake your motivations and intentions are abundantly clear. As you might say, 'a tree is known by its fruit'.

          1. aka-dj profile image78
            aka-djposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            You are partially correct. I dislike religion with a passion. If they sanction or motivate behaviour such as described in the OP, I will attack that injustice!( smile just for you)

            Please show me references where these sorts of actions are deplored by Muslims.


            Direct me to some threads that you have started addressing these issues. Otherwise, you are off topic.

            1. Don W profile image83
              Don Wposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              I'll ignore the other comments in your response to specifically address this one. How can you discuss a subject when you are ignorant of the basic facts? There are lots of Muslim individuals and organisations that have spoken out against stoning and religious violence.

              -- The Violence Is Not Our Culture campaign was started by a Muslim, Yakin Ertürk, "to eliminate all forms of 'culturally-justified' violence".

              -- The Free Muslims Coalition is a Muslim organisation that condemns both religious violence and terrosim.

              -- The Women’s Islamic Initiative in Spirituality and Equality (WISE) is an international social justice movement led by Muslim women. Here is what they say about stoning.

              -- The Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan is a group formed by Muslim women to condemn stoning and other fundamentalist practices.

              -- Here is a Muslim T.V. programme on Aljezeera presented by Riz Khan that condemns honour killings, and explores the issues surrounding that brutal practice.

              -- And another programme of his about religious violence where he critically examines the issue. Both Islam and Christianity are discussed.

              -- The Institute for the Secularisation of Islamic Society is an organisation established by Muslims who want to see the complete separation of state and religion in Islamic countries. Read their mission statement.

              You have the audacity to imply that Muslims are doing nothing to speak out against brutal practices in Islamic countries, while these people risk their lives doing exactly that. Do you think it's easy for women in Afghanistan to start a group denouncing violence in Islam? Yet rather than offer support to these Muslims who speak out, you dismiss them and pretend they don't exist, just so you can score some points in your 'my beliefs are better than your beliefs' competition. Think about what I'm saying to you.

              Stoning is an abhorrent practice, on that we agree. But don't use it as a stick to hit Muslims with. These people are your brothers and sisters. Condemn the practice alongside those Muslims who speak out, and help them deliver that message to others. Don't deny they exist because it fits the narrative you want to deliver. That's just ignorant and self-serving. If I know anything about the real teachings of Jesus, who some people call the Christ, it's that love is top of the list of virtues. What love are you showing the Muslims above, who could have witnessed first hand such brutal practices, and who are trying their hardest to fight that injustice from the inside? With your comments in this thread you are really stomping on them, and it breaks my heart to see it.

              1. aka-dj profile image78
                aka-djposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Very good, thanks.

                Nice of you to ignre the rest of my comments.

                Don't be too upset if I do the same with most of yours from here on out.

                1. Don W profile image83
                  Don Wposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  Translation: seems I've been proven wrong, but I don't have the moral courage to admit that, so I'll make a weak show of pretending to be offended in the vain hope no one notices the cop out.

                  Well that post will remain there as a reminder of those Muslims risking their lives to speak out against religious violence, for the next time you try to pretend they don't exist. Perhaps you could pray for them to be successful in their fight against injustice.

                  1. aka-dj profile image78
                    aka-djposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    Sorry to disappoint you, and your condescending tone.

                    I wasn't proven wrong, nor am I too gutless to admit wrong.

                    The truth is, this thread has been dead for about nine months. I haven't spent any time researching to find information such as the links you supplied (which I asked for).

                    On another note, I don't get offended, period.
                    People here don't affect me in the least, esp antagonistic ones, such as yourself.

                    But, my last point stands. Consider yourself ignored!
                    big_smile  (since you like my smileys).

              2. aka-dj profile image78
                aka-djposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Here's something else these Muslims can work on, and eradicate.

                http://www.examiner.com/article/egyptia … ristianity

                1. Don W profile image83
                  Don Wposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  Let's hope they can. And let's hope non Muslims will recognise, encourage and support Muslims who risk their lives to speak out against religious violence. Like the person who published the video you link to. His name is Tawfik Okasha, an Egyptian journalist. He aired the video on Egyptian television in condemnation of the violence committed by the Muslim Brotherhood. He is an outspoken critic of that new regime and has received death threats because of it.

                  Strangely the original story on the Christian Post website doesn't mention any of that. It mentions other Egyptians, but only Christians. Not a single Muslim is mentioned condemning it, despite the fact it was a Muslim journalist who first brought it to light. That's the narrative of division. Don't peddle that rubbish.

                  The best chance of eradicating religious violence is for Christians and Muslims who are against violence to stand shoulder to shoulder against Christians and Muslims who commit violent crimes. It's not Christians against Muslims. It's peaceful people against violent people. There are peaceful Muslims and there are peaceful Christians. Anyone who says different is peddling the narrative of division. I guarantee more people in Egypt are interested in feeding their kids and leading a happy life, than killing Christians. Start peddling unity and love, stop peddling division and hate. The former is more powerful than the latter as you well know.

  2. kirstenblog profile image78
    kirstenblogposted 5 years ago

    Now if this was stoned as in what you get if you puff of the wacky baccy, I might convert to Islam! LOL (not really, my anti-religious beliefs preclude that but joking about it is fine lol)

    1. aka-dj profile image78
      aka-djposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      If you must! hmm

      Two women suffered a humiliating death, FOR WHAT?
      And you care to joke about that? Or did I misunderstand your comment altogether?

      1. kirstenblog profile image78
        kirstenblogposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        I do joke, mostly because the level of insanity here is beyond what I can cope with without joking. I simply cannot fathom how a religion that does this can ever be called peaceful as we so often hear it called here on the forums. It is beyond my ability to comprehend. So many of the Muslim posters here talk about how the teaching of Jesus are in line with the teachings of Islam but Jesus spoke out against this barbaric act of stoning 2 thousand years ago and they are still doing it. Point this sort of thing out to them and you will be ignored or some word soup will be split all over you that is absolutely meaningless and avoids the very obvious contradiction. What point is there in talking about it in any real serious way, when these people want to believe this garbage? It's just about as likely to change their minds as making fun of them will and since jokes of poor taste are how I deal with this sort of insanity it's sort of automatic. My posting anything at all is not down to how it will change someone's mind but more to my own need to say how absolutely absurd the logic of Islam is when women still get stoned to death. I honestly do not mean to cause offense to those who are rightly horrified by this sort of thing. I don't mind if those who defend Islam in the face of this sort of thing are offended tho, they should be. They should be offended by their religion and to my way of thinking this sort of thing should be one of the few things that actually can be called a violation of their blasphemy laws, as this is using religion and the name they give to God to commit the crime of murder.

  3. profile image0
    Emile Rposted 5 years ago

    I guess no one is talking about it because it isn't a deviation from the stories that keep coming out of that region. We all know what little regard Islam can show for women.

    But, if the people  of Afghanistan won't stand against it, they may be for it. We can't force our ways on them any more than they can force their ways onto us.

    Or, the Taliban are simply thugs with a lot of power. Either way, if they won't stand against it we can't change their lives for them.

  4. profile image0
    icountthetimesposted 5 years ago

    I think, at one time or another, barbaric acts have been carried out and justified in the name of all major religions. It just so happens that at this moment in time Islam is seen to be more brutal. I can understand why people would feel this way after reading stories like this where lives are taken for reasons that most people would find dumbfounding.

    Personally I'm against the death penalty for all reasons and in all countries. We should all set positive examples for the world.

    1. profile image68
      paarsurreyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      - communits atheists did also do such barbaric acts.

      The point is if it is in the root teachings; then religion is responsible of it.

      1. aka-dj profile image78
        aka-djposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        This is the FIRST comment by you that I actually agree with. Well done!

  5. ARSHAD MAJID profile image79
    ARSHAD MAJIDposted 5 years ago

    Strangely enough; stoning is not mentioned in Quran. Infect the Quranic punishment of adultery is 100 lashes and that also such that the person lashing is only allowed to move the hand below elbow.  Anyone can search it at any Quran site such as (www.searchtruth.com). Stoning infect is mentioned in Old Testament or Torah.

    1. Disappearinghead profile image89
      Disappearingheadposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Who's writings are used to justify stoning then?

      1. kirstenblog profile image78
        kirstenblogposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Good question considering stoning only seems to happen now in Islamic states….. hmm

        1. Jeff Berndt profile image93
          Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          Yeah, I see how this doesn't count as stoning, as such. But killing in the name of God is alive in the Western world as well.

          1. kirstenblog profile image78
            kirstenblogposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Spanking to death, how sickning! And the bible does say, spare the rod and spoil the child. I have always wondered why the bible doesn't talk to much about respecting our kids but commands they give the respect they may not actually be getting in return. I think I was once quoted from the bible something about how harming a child harms god more then most other sins but as its a he says she says sort of thing and I have not been able to find this verse to use when I meet a fundie who thinks God wants them to abuse their kids. I really wish people could separate this idea of being a good person and religion. hmm

            1. Jeff Berndt profile image93
              Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              "And the bible does say, spare the rod and spoil the child."

              It doesn't actually say that. It says this:

              "He that spareth his rod hateth his son: but he that loveth him chasteneth him betimes."

              But how many of us in this modern, citified society knows what a shepherd actually does with his rod?

              A shepherd uses his rod to guide his sheep, not to beat them, as he takes them from pasture to pasture. He might nudge them, sure, but the rod isn't for punishing--it's for guiding. Just like the border collie doesn't really bite the sheep's ankles, but rather nips them, not to harm them but to keep them in a group.

              A good interpretation of the above proverb for modern ears might be: If you love your kids, you will correct them when they behave badly. If you don't correct your kids when they do wrong, you're not doing them any favors.

              I don't know where "Spare the rod, spoil the child" came from, but it has a lovely alliterative quality, and it kinda means what the original text means, except when you don't realize that the rod isn't a literal rod for beating your kid stupid with.

              1. aka-dj profile image78
                aka-djposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                This is a good explanation.
                So sad so many christians don't know this! smile

              2. kirstenblog profile image78
                kirstenblogposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Hi Jeff, sorry I didn't see your post earlier (I am sure time zones are to blame LOL). I have not heard the passage you quoted exactly as you quoted, I suspect perhaps because of different interpretations and translations of the text?
                I think if your interpretation had been used instead it would be harder to turn into something that can be used to justify child abuse. It is clear and concise, not a metaphor to be interpreted but simply a statement about the basics of being a good parent. So much of the bible is supposed to be taken as metaphor these days, it makes it hard for someone like me to take it with the seriousness that the various religions would like.
                The funny thing is if you simply posted your interpretation in a thread about parenting, I would be in total agreement, 100%, but the biblical quote is very likely to evoke emotions very unrelated to the issue of parenting and child abuse and while your point would be the exact same , the reaction you would get would be very different because I don't believe in the bible. I guess you could say I think religion confuses things that are simple with ideas about God and such and I find that dangerous. When we cut through the differences we may have we find we agree on the basic concept that disciplining a child is important but abusing them is as dangerous or more dangerous then no discipline at all. If religion isn't a part of the conversation we can often start out agreeing, right off the bat smile

                1. Jeff Berndt profile image93
                  Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  "I have not heard the passage you quoted exactly as you quoted, I suspect perhaps because of different interpretations and translations of the text?"

                  Erm....maybe. But it might be that most people don't actually read the Bible. The Spare the rod, spoil the child thing is a simplified version of the full verse, and it's easier to remember. The problem is, nobody in the modern world knows what the heck a rod is really used for. Also, the lazy interpretation ("It's good to hit your kids now and then.") is used to justify what people do anyway.

                  And sadly, that's what a lot of people seem to use the Bible for: to give themselves an excuse or justification for being @$$#0l3$.

                  "The funny thing is if you simply posted your interpretation in a thread about parenting, I would be in total agreement, 100%, but the biblical quote is very likely to evoke emotions very unrelated to the issue of parenting and child abuse and while your point would be the exact same , the reaction you would get would be very different because I don't believe in the bible."

                  Well, yeah, that's the thing. If it's true, it's true, right? It shouldn't matter if it comes from the Bible, or your high school physics text, or a gum-wrapper, right? Plus, the simplified version that everyone quotes isn't really in the Bible--not that way, anyway.

                  There's a lot of so-called Bibles quotes that aren't really in the Bible. For example, "God helps those that help themselves" isn't really a Bible passage either.

                  1. kirstenblog profile image78
                    kirstenblogposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    Well your reply got buried in my inbox (that happens when I get 60+ emails come down telling me who replied to what). You say if something is true it's true and shouldn't matter where it comes from. I can totally agree with that but what I don't understand is why mix up these basic truths with what could be called superstition? If I say to you that to beat your children is abuse and so is neglecting their need for discipline and limits to test we can agree and get on with the job of practicing this sort of truth. If I instead tell you that my God the flying spaghetti monster will drown you in moldy fermenting sauce and overcooked noodles (a horrific hell, I can assure you LOL) if you don't care for your children properly (like you need the lesson, NOT) we could easily fall into an argument. Is this the real purpose of religion? To give us reasons to argue about stuff that we could easily have just agreed on otherwise?
                    It is my experience that this is exactly what religion does to those who cannot free themselves from the knee jerk reaction to argue when told what to do/how to live. I think the best of us can and do fall for that trap. I suspect you are like me in some ways, I suspect that you are living your life to the best of your abilities, trying to be a good person and I bet that we have simply had different paths that lead us to this effort. Religion must have been a positive part of your path (unless I am wrong and you aren't trying to live the best life you can hehe) where as for me, it has been a destructive element. I have never seen anything else that can make a good person do bad things other then religion. It is sad because there are so many good people in every religion and many of them can't don't or won't see the good in the other religious people because it might somehow hurt their own beliefs (like those beliefs are more important then the lessons those beliefs are trying to impart). I somehow don't think a God of love would create such a divisive thing as religion hmm
                    It may shake it's metaphorical head with sorrow that we just HAD to complicate what are in truth simple matters and feel joy whenever we see past the BS.

                    Somewhat off topic...
                    Can you help me with a bible quote?
                    I read the bible cover to cover when I was much younger but don't remember much of it (reading lineages for instance kinda went in one ear and out the other as irrelevant). I remember a passage that went something a long the lines of "When so ever 2 people gather in my name, that is church". Am I remembering something not actually in the bible or is it in there? (that saying is as close to church as I get)

    2. Greek One profile image79
      Greek Oneposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      sigh... oh i wish for simpler more humane days when a good 100 lashings would make everything right

  6. Hokey profile image61
    Hokeyposted 5 years ago

    How can anyone condone such brutality? It is a known fact that men can have and do have many wives. Why arent men caught in the same act treated the same. Stone both of them. If that started happening I think alot less men will be ready to stone to death another human being for matters best left to the heart and not the judicial system.

    1. LeanMan profile image82
      LeanManposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Stoning also applies to men if they are caught... however a woman is buried in sand to the neck and is allowed to go free if she can escape - a man is buried to the waist and can also go free if he escapes... Or so I was told while I was out there!!!

      1. Abdul Muqeet Khan profile image62
        Abdul Muqeet Khanposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        i dont know where u got ur info from but trust me its all wrong

  7. Jeff Berndt profile image93
    Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago

    It's not adultery if you're married....hmm

    1. aka-dj profile image78
      aka-djposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      It's adultery if you are married.
      It's FORNICATION, if you are NOT married.

      Come on. Get it right, man!

      1. Jeff Berndt profile image93
        Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        lol Fair point.

        It's not adultery if you're married to the person you're doing it with, is what I meant.

        1. ARSHAD MAJID profile image79
          ARSHAD MAJIDposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          May be when men get stoned the media does not cover it, as such incident does not carry much sensation.  Media decides how much and which events needs to be covered and how much to be repeated and sensationalized. Then which countries to target and which to neglect. The fact is that there is no evidence yet to prove; that stoning is a  standard punishment in any country with established statistics. We all know it happens in Iran or Afghanistan but we don't know about the frequency despite of the fact that Afghanistan  is one of the countries with maximum presence of NGO's. I wish there is some compiled data for everyone to know the graveness of the problem.  I remember that one of my friend told me not to ever go to USA, as it is a country of serial killers who will kill you, just to increase their score. I don't blame him as he was inspired by some  news stories and some great movies made on them.

          1. Jeff Berndt profile image93
            Jeff Berndtposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            "May be when men get stoned the media does not cover it, as such incident does not carry much sensation."
            I dunno, to my mind, anyone getting stoned to death is pretty sensational and horrid.

            "I remember that one of my friend told me not to ever go to USA, as it is a country of serial killers who will kill you, just to increase their score."
            That's not true! Some of us are cowboys and lifeguards! lol But you point about the media choosing which stories to promote and which stories to bury is well taken; we would all do well to remember that life in other countries is probably very different from what we imagine, and probably a lot more like life in our own country than we think.

            It helps if you have the opportunity to live abroad for a while.

            1. ARSHAD MAJID profile image79
              ARSHAD MAJIDposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              I don't mind cowboys and certainly not the lifeguards but still the alien ones disturb me smile

        2. ARSHAD MAJID profile image79
          ARSHAD MAJIDposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          May be when men get stoned the media does not cover it, as such incident does not carry much sensation.  Media decides how much and which events needs to be covered and how much to be repeated and sensationalized. Then which countries to target and which to neglect. The fact is that there is no evidence yet to prove; that stoning is a  standard punishment in any country with established statistics. We all know it happens in Iran or Afghanistan but we don't know about the frequency despite of the fact that Afghanistan  is one of the countries with maximum presence of NGO's. I wish there is some compiled data for everyone to know the graveness of the problem.  I remember that one of my friend told me not to ever go to USA, as it is a country of serial killers who will kill you, just to increase their score. I don't blame him as he was inspired by some  news stories and some great movies made on them.

  8. LeanMan profile image82
    LeanManposted 5 years ago

    Whilst I was out in Saudi Arabia a woman was gang raped by a bunch of guys - the guys were all beheaded when they were caught and found guilty...

    The woman however was tried for adultery (She was raped!), found guilty and the husband asked for the death penalty and it was given!!!! This was overturned by the king after it was in the press in neighboring countries and commuted to imprisonment and lashes!!!!!!!!

    Nothing to do with uneducated terrorists - Muslim law in operation in the country in which it originated!

    1. Abdul Muqeet Khan profile image62
      Abdul Muqeet Khanposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      then u would be glad to know that you are hopelessly wrong islam is so diverse that there are like 72 sects one is salafi other is sufi one is shia one is sunni and many other  do u know that saudi arabia and taliban are basically one entity that is salafi islam that means the forcement of Islam on commen people we belive that no islam cant be forced i repreasent perhaps both a sunni islam and a sufi islam  some belive that saudi are right many belive they are not 70 sect belive that the rules in saudi arabia are not in accordance of islam in fact they are just state rules based on the leanet version of islam yet forceful in justice so saying that its the islamic law is vague for some it is for some its actually modifeid and for some not islamic so plz be carefull in what u right and in cased u know who is it that are fighting the alshabab in somali its the muslims again who belive they are not muslims in the first place

  9. Shil1978 profile image87
    Shil1978posted 4 years ago

    I believe Sufi Islam is a much more tolerant version of Islam compared to the Wahhabi version of Islam that is followed in countries such as Saudi Arabia. However, I believe, Sufism is something that has been frowned upon and followers of it persecuted in most Islamic countries. The Taliban of course (when they ruled Afghanistan) were looked upon as good/perfect practitioners of Sharia Law by most Muslim countries. If not for 9/11, the Taliban would still be ruling Afghanistan according to their interpretation (I'd like to believe) of Sharia Law. I don't know if the real Sharia Law is the same thing as the Taliban implemented in Afghanistan when they ruled?

  10. Cereal profile image59
    Cerealposted 4 years ago

    I agree.  I used to get really upset at this type of malice, but I don't any longer.  There is SO much good Islam brings to the world- for so very many people, that I will not focus my energy defending every bit of hate, but rather, relishing in all things that are love, logic and sanity that is Islam. 

    Confusing HUMAN actions, interpretations, customs and judgments as ISLAM is an injustice to YOURSELF and to humanity.

 
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