jump to last post 1-3 of 3 discussions (52 posts)

I know who I'm voting for.

  1. mischeviousme profile image60
    mischeviousmeposted 5 years ago

    http://youtu.be/8WhFhDOjUg0
    He's actually a pretty decent guy.

    1. jonnycomelately profile image85
      jonnycomelatelyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      What a man of great sense and wisdom.   What are his chances?

      1. mischeviousme profile image60
        mischeviousmeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Unfortuately, he died soon after that interview...

  2. profile image0
    Emile Rposted 5 years ago

    Apparently you have never had to deal with the disgusting nature of a person with an addiction to something like heroine. They will abuse anyone and anything they can if it furthers their chances of obtaining the drug. It ruins their lives and the lives of those around them.

    Ron Paul makes sense, on some levels. He apparently hasn't thought some things through to their logical conclusion. He wouldn't garner my vote, if that interview is the extent of his opinion on the topic.

    1. mischeviousme profile image60
      mischeviousmeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      It is an issue of choice, not law. If parents don't instill good habits in their children, then their children develope their own habits.

      1. profile image0
        Emile Rposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        That's ridiculous. Children will experiment. They push the envelope. It is part of being a kid. I wouldn't vote for any idiot that wanted to legalize and/or decriminalize drugs like heroine. Doing that only makes them look less dangerous to children not mature enough to understand.

        1. mischeviousme profile image60
          mischeviousmeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          But it also limits the criminal aspect of it. Countries that made drugs accessible, had experienced lower crime rates and a drop in usage. Amsterdam has less crime than almost any other city in the world. I think it should be an adult choice and that the drugs be sold over the counter, out of reach to restricted age groups.

          1. profile image0
            Emile Rposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            That's working out ever so well with cigarettes and alcohol. roll

            1. mischeviousme profile image60
              mischeviousmeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Playing big brother took the fathers away, the children became like the father and so on, ad-nauseum. The prison system brings in alot of money, drugs bring in more. Limiting usage, having stations for addicts to recieve limited supply. Like a mathedone clinic or as can be prescribed, they would only recieve small portions of the full prescription or appying safe dosage for users.

              1. Jason Marovich profile image88
                Jason Marovichposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                American lawmakers have been well aware of what's worked in Britain, France, and the Netherlands.  There is just zero support for trying to control heroin addicts in the USA.  In fact, last time I talked with a heroin addict she told me her methadone clinic had closed and she'd have to travel twice as far to a different one.  So, I'm guessing that already negative public opinion on maintaining heroin addict's addiction is losing, rather than gaining support.

              2. profile image0
                Emile Rposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Sorry. I know two heroine addicts. They are disgusting. They had a kid together who is currently being neglected with the blessings of social services. They are useless members of society, living on the rest of us.  Stealing, lying and cheating their way to their next fix. I would never support decriminalization. I believe any who support it are either blind, naive or addicted already.

                1. Jason Marovich profile image88
                  Jason Marovichposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  I understand the anger because there's kids involved.  A melding of drug addiction and parenting is never pretty.

                  To be fair, though, all drug addicts are different.  Heroin and opiate (pill form) abuse are very similar.  Because the problem is so widespread, I think restraint is in order, where applicable to our views.

                  There are good people that had it rough, and there are bad people that had it easy.  Surprisingly, it takes all kinds to make a world populated by drug addicts.  The USA has chosen to focus on education and reform, where drug addiction is concerned, instead of maintenance.

                  1. profile image0
                    Emile Rposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    Well, I'm sure there has to be a better system. But, this type of addiction appears to be a monkey firmly planted on the back of the addict. From what I've been told by people, and my observation; once addicted to heroin only death or incarceration can make you stop. And methadone is simply keeping them high legally. It has not changed their behavior patterns.

                    I'd be more than happy to support any attempts at programs to assist these people (if there was any hope that they would work) but I consider the thought of making it easier to obtain the drug for those not already within the grips of addiction ludicrous.

                2. jonnycomelately profile image85
                  jonnycomelatelyposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Emile I would bet that those two people spend all their money on the drugs, to the point where their children's health and their own suffers.  Spend you money on the addiction, and you have virtually nothing left for food, hygiene, enjoyment of life, beyond the next fix.  If someone was to help them with the provision of much lower-cost drugs, this would be a great leap forward for the welfare of the kids.

                  Why is the price of the drugs so high?  Because it's illegal.  Lots of people make millions out of the illegal marketing.  This applies, surely, to all the addictive ilicit drugs.

                  On top of this, you have do-gooder people who throw up their hands in horror at "these evil people" who become addicted.

                  There are some good people, not necessarily of a christian persuasion, who work at the grass roots level with addicts.  These are in the minority, I suggest.  Those holier-than-thou good christian people, in the majority, are the ones preventing enlightened reform of the drug "problem."

                  My opinions here, open to rebuke, as I am sure will fly in here, but happy to be corrected if there is any well-informed, honest criticism.

                  1. profile image0
                    Emile Rposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    Well, the two I know don't bother to work. They simply steal from family.  I know of two others, one dead now and the other in jail with no chance of parole. They didn't work either.

                    You guys are confusing a valid argument for recreational drugs like marijuana with a foolish argument to legalize drugs that truly ruin the lives of those who take them and the lives of everyone that loves them.

                    Your argument to lower the cost makes no sense at all. Unless, of course, you are arguing that it would make trafficking unattractive. But, then it could easily be argued that the trafficker could make up the difference in volume.

                    You can pooh pooh the efforts of a good percentage of those attempting to make a difference, but I'd have to raise an eyebrow. One of the most successful programs for young addicts in our area is a Christian half way home that works solely on donations by the public. No government resources solicited.

                    Obviously, no one has found the cure all answer. But, I just can't see legalization as a viable option.

          2. Disappearinghead profile image85
            Disappearingheadposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Hard drugs are not legalised in Amsterdam, and they do have a major problem with hard drug usage, like other large cities.

  3. profile image0
    Emile Rposted 5 years ago

    Hey mm. Something has been nagging at me since you started this bizarre thread. How do you figure this subject falls into the category of religion and philosophy?

    1. mischeviousme profile image60
      mischeviousmeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

      Most of the reason there is a problem in this country, is because of puritanical, christian piety. The government is run by a bunch of southern baptist, old money windbags and their opinion stinks. One of the reason marijuana is ilegal, is because of a southern baptists rantings. He said "The N-words are getting high and raping white women". He was a cotton magnate and knew hemp was a better material, so he did the best thing he knew to stop it. He scapegoated it by attaching morally reprehensible motives to it's users.

      Of course, christians demonize everything, including members of their own society. Just because someone uses drugs, does not mean that they are like the few extreme cases. Did you ever stop to think that, if it were legal, addicts wouldn't lose their jobs, adding to their usage, in turn driving them to increasingly criminal behavior? If the christian right were stripped of it's power, this country would change, for the better.

      1. profile image0
        Emile Rposted 5 years ago in reply to this

        Whatever, man. You do a good job of demonizing others. Sorry you lost your job due to drug addiction. I'm afraid, the industry I work in doesn't want strung out druggies on our job sites. You endanger our employees as well as yourself.

        Believe it, or not, you can rid the world of Southern Baptists and their fundamentalist groupies and people with brains in their heads will still oppose ignorant ideas like legalizing heroine.

        As to pot, it's already accepted in society. People who take pride in their work and companies who expect to produce a quality product don't expect to have to deal with it at work, anymore than we want a drunk on the jobsites. If this inhibits your freedom, you might rethink your work ethic. smile

        1. mischeviousme profile image60
          mischeviousmeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

          I point out the idiocy of the belief, not the value of the person behind it. Though I tend to think that christianity warps a mind and creates highly insane mindsets. Copy and paste anything I've said that would look like the demonizing of an individual an I'll eat my words.

          I didn't say that people should be allowed to use drugs at work, that's you putting words in my mouth. I was stating a simple opinion and you are using misplaced judgements about my character, to prove your argument. I only smoke pot and it doesn't affect my work ethic in the least. Of course I partake in my libation after work, not before or during. Like most responsible adults in this country, I like to separate work and play.

          1. profile image0
            Emile Rposted 5 years ago in reply to this

            Where did I say that you were demonizing individuals? You appear to be quite adept at attempting to put words in the mouths of others. Attempting, being the key word in that sentence. I didn't accuse you of that.

            The reason I assumed (and yes, I did assume) that you were quite liberal as to the timing that you smoke a joint is because of your attitude. Very few people are this upset about the laws in America unless they find themselves inhibited by following a few social rules along with safe work practices.

            There is nothing standing in the way of anyone responsibly smoking pot. Well, not anywhere I have lived so far. I don't know, do you live in a state where it is a felony to own some pot? Do those places exist anymore?

            As I stated previously, you are attempting to take a valid argument (which is the legalization of pot) and strap it to a ridiculous argument that all drugs should be legalized. As long as you do that, you really don't have an intelligent argument.

            1. mischeviousme profile image60
              mischeviousmeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

              Let me put my stance up, outright. I believe certain drugs should remain ilegal..., 1)Cocaine 2)Heroine 3)Meth 4)Phenobarbitol and the list would continue. Basically I'm more for the legalization of pot, than any of the others. But it still boils down to personal choice...

              1. profile image0
                Emile Rposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                Legalize pot. I agree, it should be legalized.

                1. mischeviousme profile image60
                  mischeviousmeposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                  Can you think of any reason it shouldn't be? Most of the inmates in jails and prisons, are non-violent users. To legalize pot would free up space for the real criminals; rapists, murderers and gangbangers/thugs.

                  1. profile image0
                    Emile Rposted 5 years ago in reply to this

                    I am not aware of anyone in jail because they smoked a little pot.  Can you provide some statistics?

 
working