Sacrifices

sacrifice

Sacrifice is known as a Korban, from the Hebrew root karov, meaning "to [come] close [to God]".

It is commonly known as the practice of offering food, objects (typically valuables), or the lives of animals or people as an act of propitiation or worship.

It is also used metaphorically to describe selfless good deeds for others or a short term loss in return for a greater gain. The important thing is to be able at any moment to sacrifice what we are for what we could become. Non-cooperation is a measure of discipline and sacrifice, and it demands respect for the opposite views.


Self-sacrifice, is also the act of deliberately following a course of action that has a high risk or certainty of suffering or death (which could otherwise be avoided), in order to achieve a perceived benefit for certain others, is a powerful theme with a well-established place in many cultures, myths, and societies.

Self-sacrifice may also be more broadly defined as selflessness, or the readiness to inflict pain upon yourself to save others.


The centrality of sacrifices is clear, with much of the Bible, particularly the opening chapters of the book Leviticus, detailing the exact method of bringing sacrifices.

He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he opened not his mouth: he is brought as a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before her shearers is dumb, so he openeth not his mouth.

The innermost meaning of sacrifice is the annihilation of the finite just because it is finite. In order to demonstrate that this is the only purpose, the most noble and beautiful must be chosen; above all, man, the fulfillment of the earth.

Human sacrifices are the most natural sacrifices. Man, however, is more than the fulfillment of the earth; he is reasonable, and reason is free and nothing but an eternal self-determination toward the infinite.


Resistance to oppression is often based on a love that leads us to value ourselves, and leads us to hope for more than the established cultural system is willing to grant ... such love is far more energizing than guilt, duty, or self-sacrifice.

Love for others leads us to accept accountability (in contrast to feeling guilt) and motivates our search for ways to end our complicity with structures of oppression. Solidarity does not require self-sacrifice, but an enlargement of the self to include community with others.

It is not the critic who counts, not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled, or where the doer of deeds could have done better.

The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes short again and again, who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, and spends himself in a worthy cause, who at best knows achievement and who at the worst if he fails at least fails while daring greatly so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.

The Roots of Violence are : Wealth without work, Pleasure without conscience, Knowledge without character, Commerce without morality, Science without humanity, Worship without sacrifice, Politics without principles.








Comments 3 comments

robie2 profile image

robie2 7 years ago from Central New Jersey

Thanks for this-- excellent work. I especially like your recounting of the roots of violence:-)


tarimi 7 years ago

wow this article is excellent and educating.i love it


tarimi 7 years ago

wow this article is excellent and educating.i love it

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