Appalachian Mountains and Appalachian Trail

Catawba Valley ~

Catawba Valley as seen from the McAfee Knob overlook.
Catawba Valley as seen from the McAfee Knob overlook. | Source

Flora and Fauna ~

Spring is warming up Earth and the Appalachian Mountains along the Appalachian Trail in eastern USA is a beautiful place to observe rebirth of nature.

From now until the end of autumn wildflowers in the Appalachians are abundant and beautiful. From the gentle, soft colored spring flowers to the bold and spectacular fall colors, the Appalachians show off nature's finest.

Wildlife that may be seen are the black bear, deer, elk, moose and small critters.The black bear usually will not bother the hikers, still be cautious and give it space should you see one.

There are also two kinds of venomous snakes -- the copperhead and the Eastern timber rattlesnake. Make sure you carry a snake bite kit, just in case.

The Appalachians are home to some rare and endangered species of both plants and animals. Protect the environment and remember to take nothing from nature but photos.

The views from trail high points are amazing. It is a photographer's paradise.

Oconee Bells ~

Oconee Bells (Shortia galacifolia)
Oconee Bells (Shortia galacifolia) | Source

Eastern Timber rattlesnake ~

Eastern Timber Rattlesnake, there is a reason for its name: crotalus horridus
Eastern Timber Rattlesnake, there is a reason for its name: crotalus horridus | Source

Culture ~

The Appalachian Mountains are home to a wide range of cultures. The name itself came from the word Appalachee, from the Indians of the same name. The Appalachee lived in northwest Florida from at least A.D. 1000. They existed on their agricultural knowledge and hunting. From Florida they migrated into Louisiana and Georgia.

The Cherokee and Shawnee Indians were in the area for more than a thousand years prior to people coming in from England, Scotland, Germany, Ireland, Wales, France, Italy, Holland, and Africa. This created some very diverse and multicultural regions.

Invariably, if in the mountains long enough, you will hear some quaint old folk sayings. It is a unique way the mountain folk have of talking and believing their superstitions.

The 'mountain folk' in the Appalachians are gems of nature. The gems of the past come forth when we stop long enough to see and hear them. The love and support those folks gave to each other most definitely was a way of healing. What power, what a blessed gift they had. The Appalachians are full of magic, beauty, and spirituality.

Old folk sayings ~

If it rains on Easter Sunday, it will rain for seven Sundays in a row.

If the bottom of your foot itches, it means you are going to walk on strange ground

Two miles as the crow flies.

She’s prettier than a speckled pup.

Come on in and see how pore folks live.

To get rid of warts, steel someone's dishcloth (used) and bury it, the warts will disappear.

You can never conquer a mountain, but you can conquer yourself.

Appalachian Mountain system ~

Appalachian Mountain system in eastern United States.
Appalachian Mountain system in eastern United States. | Source

Formation of the mountains ~

The Appalachians were formed during a series of collisions and separations of tectonic plates that began 300 million years ago and continued through the Paleozoic and Mesozoic Eras. When the Appalachians were still forming, the continents were in different locations than they are today and North America and Europe had collided. The Appalachians were once an extension of the Caledonia mountain chain, a mountain chain that is today in Scotland and Scandinavia.

The Appalachian Mountain range is an ancient band of some of the most beautiful mountain areas in North America. The range stretches from the island of Newfoundland in southeastern Canada and extends 1,500 miles down in a southwestward direction to Central Alabama in the United States -- with portions of 200 to 300 miles wide. It is believed that during the Ordovician period, roughly 460 million years ago, the Appalachian Mountains stood as the highest mountains on earth. It is now the second largest mountain range in the United States.

The significant ranges of the Appalachians are the Cumberland Mountains in Tennessee, the Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia, the Alleghenies in Pennsylvania, the Catskill Mountains in New York, the Green Mountains in Vermont, and the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Mt. Mitchell in North Carolina is 6,684 feet high, the highest point of the entire range.

Mount Mitchell ~

Mount Mitchell, 6,684 ft , in North Carolina is the highest peak east of the Mississippi River.
Mount Mitchell, 6,684 ft , in North Carolina is the highest peak east of the Mississippi River. | Source

"View from The Mountain House" ~

Catskill Mountain House in the Catskill Mountains, 1836 by William Henry Bartlett
Catskill Mountain House in the Catskill Mountains, 1836 by William Henry Bartlett | Source

Benton MacKaye ~

Benton MacKaye, 1879 - 1975, was a visionary forester.
Benton MacKaye, 1879 - 1975, was a visionary forester. | Source

Appalachian Trail and conservation ~

The Appalachian Trail was born from the thoughts of a visionary man, Benton MacKaye. MacKaye was a forester, planner, and conservationist. His philosophy in life was to find ways to balance the needs of humans with all in nature. In 1921 MacKaye began to put his thoughts of a trail in the Appalachians down on paper and wrote an article titled "An Appalachian Trail: A Project in Regional Planning". What began as an idea and dream eventually became reality that is now a trail stretching approximately over 2,179 miles. The first part of the trail was opened in October of 1923.

Thanks to Benton MacKaye, the Appalachian Trail Conservancy and the many volunteers who give time and labor, the Appalachian Trail continues to be a beautiful connection between humans and the wilderness. It takes one who is a warrior of Mother Earth to continually protect, preserve, and maintain the natural beauty of the wilderness. By keeping the trails usable for hikers, the wilderness is then kept as it should be so the flora and fauna of the Appalachian Mountains are free to be as they are meant to be.

The dedication and hard work of the volunteers each year is priceless to the maintenance of the trail and the sustainability of the environment. Many people become volunteers to help maintain the trail. You can check into this at the Appalachian Trail Conservancy site.

The Appalachian Trail Conservancy got its start from a two day conference that MacKaye scheduled in March 1925 to discuss further planning and conservation. He called it the Appalachian Trail Conference which eventually changed to its current name and became the focal point of preservation for the entire trail. With the planning and dedication by MacKaye and many others, the entire trail was completed in 1937. It is now a popular destination for hikers.

If you have ever hiked the Appalachian Trail, you may sometimes wonder how it started and who keeps it maintained. With the help of over 6,000 volunteers putting in over 200,000 hours every year, the Appalachian Trail Conservancy preserves and makes it possible that the trail's natural beauty and heritage is there for people to enjoy.

Hiking the Appalachian Trail ~

The Appalachian Trail draws about four million people each year. It is about a 2,160 mile long hiking trail stretching from Springer Mountain in Georgia to Mount Katahdin in Maine.

People love the short day hikes along the trail, or for the more vigorous, the long-distance backpacking hikes. Make sure to take enough water on long hikes. Higher elevations will cause dehydration much quicker than lower elevations will.

Some enthusiastic hikers meet every year to hike the entire trail, which takes one season to do so. It can take up to seven months to hike from one end to the other when considering camping along the way. April 15 is the earliest most hikers will start this journey, to avoid severe weather conditions.

Being in the Appalachians, for many people, is an opportunity for adventure and spiritual renewal. For nature study, the Appalachian Trail is a wonderful place to hike.

The terrain varies from heavily wooded areas to peaceful pastoral scenes and waterfalls. Camping sites are available all along the trail and are maintained by the National Park Services.

There are many people who hike the entire trail every year -- they are referred to as "thru hikers". The first woman to walk the Appalachian Trail from beginning to end was Mildred Lisette Norman Ryder. She became known as "Peace Pilgrim". A transcript of her "Steps Toward Inner Peace" was published in 1964.

Tropical Waterfall ~

Tropical waterfall in Pisgah National Forest.
Tropical waterfall in Pisgah National Forest. | Source

End of the trail ~

The end of the trail is atop Mount Katahdin, the highest mountain in Maine. The video below shows hikers climbing the Knife Edge of Katahdin. It is an awesome experience for those who make it to the top.

The Appalachian Trail begins at Springer Mountain in Georgia and journeys for 2,179 miles through fourteen states in the U.S. The trail follows the ridgeline of the Appalachians of Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine, where the trail ends at Mount Katahdin.

Experienced hikers who have travelled the entire trail from end to end are (thru-hikers) are very familiar with the small towns the trail passes through, the rivers to be crossed, some of the highest peaks of the Appalachian range, the wilderness, remote shelters, the wildlife, and the astonishing beauty of the land.

Rising to 5,268 feet, Mount Katahdin is the highest mountain in Maine. It is located in Baxter State Park in east central Piscataquis County. Sugarloaf Mountain at 4,250 feet is the second highest point in Maine and is over one hundred miles to the southwest of Katahdin.

Katahdin is a Penobscot term meaning "The Greatest Mountain". The Penobscot people are indigenous to Maritime Canada and the northeastern United States, particularly Maine. Along with the Abenaki, Passamaquoddy, Maliseet, and Mi'kmaq nations, the Penobscot are an important part of the historical Wabanaki Confederacy. In early days of the European settlers, the land of the Wabanaki (Dawn Land) was called Acadia, which is now most of Maine, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick.

The Wabanaki peoples called this land Dawn Land, because it was believed that Katahdin was the first place where the morning sun struck, due to it's great height.

Katahdin is in the center of Baxter State Park. The park is open year round, with strict regulations in the winter months. Overnight camping is from May 15 to October 15 each year. Day use parking at the trail heads is strictly limited to avoid overuse of the trails.

The park has no electricity, running water, or paved roads. The environment is kept as wild as possible and consideration of wildlife is of great importance, thus, audio and visual devices are prohibited in ways that would disturb or harass the wildlife

For the serious hiker and mountain climber, the hike most looked forward to is the "Knife Edge". This is a narrow ridge between Pamola Peak and Baxter Peak. It is not an easy trail to traverse and certainly not for a beginner. During high winds, the Knife Edge is closed to all hikers.

Baxter State Park and the Katahdin trail is for those who love to "rough it" with outdoor activities. On any part of the trail, it is so important to have the proper outdoor gear and clothing for camping and hiking. Good cameras are essential for taking home those prized photos to add to a scrapbook or album.

Mount Katahdin ~

Mount Katahdin, the highest peak in Maine, the centerpiece of Baxter State Park, and the Northern Terminus of the Appalachian Trail.
Mount Katahdin, the highest peak in Maine, the centerpiece of Baxter State Park, and the Northern Terminus of the Appalachian Trail. | Source

Baxter Peak ~

Baxter Peak (center) and the Knife Edge Trail (center to left), Mount Katahdin in Maine
Baxter Peak (center) and the Knife Edge Trail (center to left), Mount Katahdin in Maine | Source

Katahdin Knife Edge Trail, OMGosh !

Knife Edge Trail, only for the brave ~

After watching the video below, would you hike the Knife Edge Trail?

See results without voting

Note from author ~

Thank you for reading my article. Your opinions are important to me and let me know your interests. This helps me to offer more of your favorite subjects to read about. Your time and interest are very much appreciated. I hope to hear from you in the comments section below.

I write on several different subjects, all evergreen articles. You can read more about me and see more articles I wrote by clicking on my name by the small picture of me at the top right of this page.

Blessings and may you always walk in peace and harmony, softly upon Mother Earth.

Phyllis Doyle Burns - Lantern Carrier, Spiritual Mentor
~ ~ ~ ~

© 2014 Phyllis Doyle Burns

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Comments 41 comments

billybuc profile image

billybuc 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

It's a beautiful part of the country; no doubt about that. I've done a lot of hiking in the Rockies but never back there. Thanks for the virtual hike.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi Billy. I used to hike back when, but nothing as adventurous as the AT or the Rockies. I often hiked up a hill to the little market when my kids were little and in strollers, that was about it for hiking till they got older. Then I hiked mountain trails when camping. Hey, thanks for the visit, reading and commenting.


susi10 profile image

susi10 2 years ago from The British Isles, Europe

Beautiful hub, Phyllis! I enjoyed reading about these mountains, and the pictures were beautiful. If I ever go to America on holiday, I will definitely be taking a visit to the Appalachian Mountains. I love trekking and mountain hiking, and beautiful scenery so these mountains will be the ideal place for me. I like the way that you guided us through the whole hike, it was like I was there with you following along! The flora and fauna on these mountains look unique. I love the Oconee Bells, they look beautiful.

Thanks for the great hub, voted up and shared.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi susi10. Thanks for reading and commenting. I am glad you enjoyed it. Those Oconee Bells are beautiful. The variety of wildflowers in the Appalachians is amazing. I wish I had more room in there to add more photos of flowers. Thanks again.


kerlund74 profile image

kerlund74 2 years ago from Sweden

Seams to be a beautiful place:) A wonderful and interesting hub!


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi kerlund74. Yes, it is a beautiful area. Thank you for reading and commenting. I appreciate it.


Jackie Lynnley profile image

Jackie Lynnley 2 years ago from The Beautiful South

Just beautiful and nothing can beat this, just wows you. Some of the heights just take my breath away but it is mesmerizing too.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi Jackie. I know what you mean -- the heights just astound and startle me, but it is so awesome up there. Thank you so much for your kind comment.


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 2 years ago from North Carolina

What a wonderful hub you've got here, Phyllis. You do indeed seem to have a special connection to the Appalachians. Love that painting by Bartlett! So much more...some of which I learned for the first time, despite hiking and traveling through the southern mountains more times than I can remember. Once when on the hwy. between Cherokee and Gatlinburg, which goes through the Great Smokies, I saw a massive Timber rattler throw half its body back from the road it was trying to cross. The half of it in the air looked at least 4 feet long! And if you ever see lots of cars pulled over to the side of that hwy, then there is probably a baby bear up a tree. Thank the good Lord for the beauty and extensive flora and fauna in the Appalachians. May it always stay that way.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Yes, may it always stay as beautiful as it is, Alastar, as it is meant to be. OMGosh that is a huge rattler. We get some pretty long Western Diamond Backs, but thank goodness I have only come in contact with one once in my life and I gave it a lot of space. I can hardly wait to see the Great Smokies. There is a Cherokee legend that says the mountains and valleys were created when the mighty Thunderbird collapsed from exhaustion after flying so long around Earth looking for land. Bartlett's painting is lovely, I can imagine being in it looking out over the beauty. Thank you so much for reading and commenting.


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 2 years ago from Wales

What a wonderful hub Phyllis but by now this is no surprise. Voting up, across and shared.

Eddy.


juneaukid profile image

juneaukid 2 years ago from Denver, Colorado

A fantastic hub! I very much enjoyed reading it. I've done a few pieces of this trail including Mount Katahdin and the short span of it in New Jersey.


Genna East profile image

Genna East 2 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

I love to hike but I am not what you would call "a pro". This is truly gorgeous county, and you have brought it to life with this wonderful hub and photos. Thank you! :-)


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Thank you so much, Eddy, for reading and your kind comment. I appreciate your votes and the share. Thanks, Eddy.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi juneaukid. Wow ! you are for sure one of the brave warriors of Mother Earth. To be up there on Mount Katahdin must be quite an exhilarating experience. I am happy to meet someone who has been there. I hope you will share your hikes with us in a hub. Thank you so much for reading and commenting. I so appreciate it.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi Genna. Me, too. I love to hike, but not too high up. I prefer the lower foothills. There is one hike I love to take, way out in the desert. I will write about that some day, when I get a good camera for some photos. Thank you so much for your kind compliment, reading and commenting, I really appreciate it.


sheilamyers 2 years ago

I love the mountains and forests in this region. When I was stationed in Virginia, I spent a lot of time in Shenandoah National Park. Many years ago, I told myself I'd become one of the "thru hikers", but have yet to reach that goal.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

You know, Sheila -- if I was an expert pro hiker and in good physical condition, I would love to spend one whole season on the AT and be a "thru hiker". I think it would be an awesome, very spiritual, journey to take. To be with only Self and Nature is really a profound enlightenment. Thanks for reading and commenting. Maybe you will be a "thru hiker", it seems to be within you and I believe you will do it. Thanks again.


Frank Atanacio profile image

Frank Atanacio 2 years ago from Shelton

I know this hub was very difficult to compile.. the video feed was quick to view and the information clear .. Phyllis.. in other words thank you for making it easy for guys like me.. I love hiking and climbing so this was up my alley


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi Frank. You are right -- it took me a long time to organize the capsules and find the right images, but I enjoy doing this. I am so glad you enjoyed it. I admire true hikers who can take on the difficult trails. I always wanted to become a hiker, but life took me in other directions. I have a friend who lives back in the Appalachian region. He is an OA troop leader and every year joins other troops of the OA to work on the AT, clearing, repairing and keeping the AT in good condition. He is a great outdoors man who fully respects nature and Mother Earth. If I could, I would hike the AT just for the spiritual journey. Thank you so much, Frank, for reading and commenting. As always, I appreciate it.


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 2 years ago from England

What a lovely place! I learn so much on here, I would love to go and take a look at the Appalachian mountains, wonderful hub phyllis!


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi Nell. Thanks for reading and commenting. It is a lovely place. One could write many hubs about the Appalachian regions and mountains and still not cover it all. The wild flowers alone would take several hubs. There is a charming magic within the mountains that seems to call to people. Thanks again, Nell.


oceansnsunsets profile image

oceansnsunsets 2 years ago from The Midwest, USA

Hello Phyllis,

I am amazed by the Appalachian Mountains. We were there for the first time, well for me the first time, last summer in the Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia. I have to tell you, there was something incredibly special about the place, and I had less than half a day there. I truly loved every part of it. I loved the huge boulders even, in the pull outs, the air, the trees, birds, flowers, you name it. I loved it all. This is a wonderful hub, and I thank you for sharing it!


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

OMGosh, oceansnsunsets, what a wonderful experience for you. Thank you so much for sharing this -- thank you for reading and commenting, I really appreciate it.


juneaukid profile image

juneaukid 2 years ago from Denver, Colorado

Hi Phyllis. Thanks for your comment--I already have shared many of my climbs on my hubpages including Mount Katahdin, Guadalupe Peak (high point in Texas), Longs Peak on a midnight climb to see the sunrise way out in eastern Colorado from the summit at 14,2555 in the Front Range of the Rockies. Cheers, Juneaukid


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi juneaukid, I will have to hop over there and read some of your hubs. Anxious to read the Mount Katahdin one. Thank you and have a great day.


tlpoague profile image

tlpoague 2 years ago from USA

I have always wanted to hike the Appalachian Trail. It looks like a magical place to unplug and unwind. I use to live in the mountains and loved every minute of it. There are so many things to see and do. You did a terrific job here. I can't wait to go for a visit.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Hi tipoague -- thank you so much for reading and commenting. I also love mountain living and really miss it. Hopefully, this year, I will return to the mountains. I hope you take lots of pics when you visit the mountains. Take care, and thanks again.


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 2 years ago from Wales

Again such a wonderful read Phyllis. Your obvious hard work has certainly paid off here. Here's wishing you a great day my friend.

Eddy.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Thank you, Eddy. This is so good for you to say that. Have a good evening and take care dear friend.


Randy Godwin profile image

Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

Great hub, Phyllis! My wife and have visited the Appalachians many times and in fact, we honeymooned there over 30 years ago. Did you know the Appalachians once extended to present day Scotland before Continental Drift caused cause the land masses to separate? Remnants of the chain can be seen in Scotland today. Duh, I forget the name of the mountains though. LOL!


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Thanks, Randy. It must be a lot more beautiful in person when visiting the Appalachians. Some day I will do that myself. Yes the Appalachians are remnants of the extension of the Caledonia mountain chain, a mountain chain that is today in Scotland and Scandinavia. It is rather hard to wrap my mind round that amazing fact. A piece of Scotland right here in our country is awesome, I think. Thanks, Randy, for reading and commenting.


The Examiner-1 profile image

The Examiner-1 2 years ago

That was something else Phyllis. It was interesting all the way until I watched the video, then it was double awesome!! I am not a hiker and I would not go near that trail. Even if I was a hiker I do not know if I would but I cannot say for sure since I am not. It got thumbs up and straight across (a few of those old folk sayings were funny).

Kevin


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Ah haha, Kevin -- just like me, even if I were a good hiker I would not attempt that trail. The guy who filmed that video did an awesome job of filming and hiking at the same time. Thank you so much for the visit and comment, Kevin, which I really appreciate.


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 2 years ago from North Carolina

Phyllis, you should read the new book called "Grandma Gatewoods's Walk" This is an inspiring story of the woman who saved the Appalachian Trail by walking its entirety in the 1950s!


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Thank you, Alastar, for the book reference. I will check it out. I love real stories of the Appalachians. I have never heard of Grandma Gatewoods Walk and am very interested. Thanks again, Alastar.


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

Alastar, PS: I wrote an article on Mildred Norma Ryder, whose bio says she was the first woman to walk the entire trail in one season, in 1952. Is this information wrong? She was known as Peace Pilgrim.


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 2 years ago from North Carolina

According to the book Grandma was the first woman to walk the entire length


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

I will read the book. Thank you, Alastar.


Alastar Packer profile image

Alastar Packer 2 years ago from North Carolina

My admiration grows for her with every chapter. What a woman!


Phyllis Doyle profile image

Phyllis Doyle 2 years ago from High desert of Nevada. Author

She sounds like a very independent and courageous woman who is very deserving of admiration.

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