Will Steroids Destroy Major League Baseball?

Is Dee Gordon the Dee-Man or the Roids-Man?
Is Dee Gordon the Dee-Man or the Roids-Man?
Jenrry "It's all about" Mejia, banned for life for using steroids
Jenrry "It's all about" Mejia, banned for life for using steroids
A-Rod or "A-Roid"?
A-Rod or "A-Roid"?
How did Ryan get his Braun?
How did Ryan get his Braun?
Barry Bonds or "Barroid"?
Barry Bonds or "Barroid"?
Nobody could hit 'em higher than Mark "McWired"?
Nobody could hit 'em higher than Mark "McWired"?
Say it ain't so, Sammy!
Say it ain't so, Sammy!
Manny Ramirez or "Mannyjuice"?
Manny Ramirez or "Mannyjuice"?
What fueled "The Rocket"?
What fueled "The Rocket"?
The Babe didn't do no damn drugs!
The Babe didn't do no damn drugs!

What ails the game is not injected


Major League Baseball (MLB) has had lots of trouble keeping performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) out of its ballplayers. These days, if a player tests positive for PEDs, he’s suspended for 50 games, the penalties getting much worse with each subsequent infraction. Hanging may be discussed at some date. Listening to Britney Spears CDs for a week straight would be horrific punishment as well!

During the 2009 season, Manny Ramirez, an outfielder for the Los Angeles Dodgers, flunked such a drug test. Shame on him! And damn his soul forever! If he needed to use a performance-enhancing drug, he should have tried Viagra! Hey, all he wanted to do was add another year or two to his waning career. You say Babe Ruth didn’t use drugs? But he sure ate and drank like, uh, Babe Ruth!

Even if the Babe had wanted to use anabolic steroids, they weren’t synthesized until the early 1930s, and athletes didn’t begin using them until after he had retired in 1935.

During the 2009 season, Alex Rodriguez or A-Rod, confessed to using steroids in the early 2000s and also admitted he had lied about not using them. In trouble again in 2013 because of more PEDs allegations, A-Rod - clearly past his prime these days – may have been using PEDs to strengthen his aging body in more recent times.

In fact, MLB suspended Alex Rodriguez for the entire 2014 MLB season. A-Rod, or “A-Roid,” if you will, allegedly used the company Biogenesis to acquire and use steroids during his playing career.

Moreover, MLB suspended pitchers Ervin Santana and Arodys Vizcaino for 80 games at the start of the 2015 season. Both players failed drug tests for using anabolic steroids, specifically the drug stanozolol. Also, in 2016, Dee Gordon of the Miami Marlins was suspended for 80 games for testing positive for steroids usage. In addition, he was banned from post-season play for the remainder of the season!

Former players such as Barry Bonds, Sammy Sosa, Roger Clemens and Mark McGwire have also been implicated in the use of anabolic steroids. In January 2010, McGwire admitted taking steroids during his run to break the single-season home run record in 1998; he also admitted taking PEDs throughout the 1990s. Some think McGwire will never be elected into MLB’s Hall of Fame because of his use of steroids.

Why do players use anabolic steroids and other PEDs?

The reason these players have taken PEDs is simple: money. Major League Baseball is a veritable money pit. Some players make $30 million per year, nearly all of it guaranteed, and some of those are pitchers, who don’t even play every day. Why the owners ever agreed to pay players guaranteed money is beyond comprehension. You mean you’re gonna pay some guy millions of dollars for years even if injuries keep him from playing? This happens a lot. Ask Dodger Fans. Ask Yankee fans.

In order to pay for these exorbitant salaries, fans such and you and I must pay hundreds or even thousands of dollars for a ticket to one game. (Some seats at Yankee Stadium cost as much as $2,625.) At various ballparks, parking is $10 to $20 per vehicle, and you don’t even want to think about buying a beer at $6 to $8 a pint. For tens of millions of Americans, going to a MLB game even once a year is about as possible as dating Brad Pitt or Miley Cyrus.

According to a telephone poll taken by the Associated Press and AOL Sports in April 2005, players' high salaries were named as baseball's "biggest problem" by 33 percent of those surveyed, followed by steroids at 27 percent and the cost of going to a game at 22 percent.

The public has spoken!

So please don’t revile players such as Manny Ramirez or Barry Bonds; instead, speak out against ridiculously high salaries and the sky-high prices we all must pay to see MLB games. Of course, we don’t have to keep going to these ballgames, do we? (Or paying for them on cable TV or the Internet.) Why don’t we just stop right now? That would end this “drug scandal,” if you will, fairly quickly. Ultimately, fans control the money.

Many fans left the game back in 1994 when the players refused to play the last portion of the season because they didn’t want to “turn back the clock” on free agency, the advent of which in the middle 1970s has dramatically increased salaries in baseball. All baseball fans will never forget what happened THAT YEAR. No World Series!!!

Simply put, if anything could end MLB it would be money, not drugs of any sort. Hey, if all players were on drugs, how would we know the difference? And would we really care?

If MLB must castigate all cheaters, maybe the cheaters should start a new league. There are beer leagues, why not a “juice” league?

Kidding aside, we know baseball players are not perfect people. They make mistakes; they cheat; they violate the rules. But we shouldn’t damn them to hell or shake our fists at them, because they are not the problem. As long as money remains the lifeblood of the game, we’re all going to suffer – at the ticket counter at least.

Of course, we could simply give up Major League Baseball. Give it up like a drug habit. Any takers?

Go ahead, it won’t cost a dime.

© 2009 Kelley

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Comments 22 comments

jacobt2 7 years ago

There are many places where you can get cheap tickets to see an MLB game. I live like 20 minutes from the Rangers ballpark in Arlington and I see multiple games a year for only $7. I guess if you don't live near a park it is much harder, but the game will always revolve around money. That is why the players get payed millions of dollars. I wrote a hub on this whole topic at http://hubpages.com/hub/Steroids-In-Baseball1 . Many fans would love to have steroids stop, but steroids are how the players keep up with the competition. It is an unfortunate cycle. My solution would to keep the current rules, random testings, and suspensions and other punishments in place, but also add one thing: if a player is caught using steroids, he automatically cannot enter the Hall of Fame and his records will be marked (like with an asterisk).

I am so disappionted in Sammy Sosa! Say it ain't so, Sammy! http://hubpages.com/hub/Sammy-Sosa

Nice hub!


Kosmo profile image

Kosmo 7 years ago from California Author

Keeping such transgressors from entering the Hall of Fame is not a bad idea; however, I don't advocate putting asterisks next to such players' records. You're right, if you want to sit in the bleachers, you can watch a game for $7 or so, but I would rather watch the game on TV under such circumstances. Also, unlike you, I don't live down the street from a MLB park. Later!


mrm85.com 6 years ago

Kosmo, I don't agree there are admitted cheaters in the Hall of Fame. I can't recall his name but one pitcher admitted to repeatedly spitting on the ball before he threw it to gain an unfair advantage.

Very odd how when Canseco's book came out everyone said he was fill of it, yet nothing he's said about who has used steroids has been wrong.


Kosmo profile image

Kosmo 6 years ago from California Author

Maybe you're thinking about Gaylord Perry, who used to throw a spitball, though I'm not sure he admitted it. Nevertheless, he was elected to the Hall of Fame. Of course, a long time ago that pitch was legal. Anyway, regarding Canseco, the creep that he is, seems to be telling the truth about steroid use in baseball. I guess I'll have to read his book. Later!


Source Check 6 years ago

They should have a special league for juice players!


Kosmo profile image

Kosmo 6 years ago from California Author

I agree. They probably should have a special league for juiced-up players such as Canseco. Later!


buy steroids profile image

buy steroids 6 years ago from Beijing China

I think steroids won t destroy baseball simply because of the tests in place, getting better and better and harder and harder to fool...


bogerk profile image

bogerk 5 years ago from Midwest

The MLB has really cracked down on steroids the past two seasons and it look like it may become a thing of the past. Expect to see less home runs over the years and pitchers, speed and defense start to steal some of the spotlight.


mastershops profile image

mastershops 5 years ago from Branson, Missouri

I think the game is much better with steroids taken out of the game. baseball is a game of science. Just adding 10 feet to your fly balls is the different between hitting 30 and 45 home runs easily. It got way out of hand and Barry Bonds should have an asterisk by his record. Hank Aaron is the true home run king.


Kosmo profile image

Kosmo 5 years ago from California Author

There does seem to be more integrity in the game now that steroids have been more or less eliminated. As for Bonds, it's hard to say how "juiced" he was. I guess we'll never know for sure. Play ball. Later!


Ken Michael 4 years ago

I believe the problem is the owners agreeing to guaranteed money, so when a contract year comes around, players take PEDs and then sign a huge contract, get caught, suspended for 50 games without pay, then the contract continues even when obviously the players production suffers without the PEDs, but he continues to collect a ridiculous amount of money every year just for cheating in one. Its official, crime pays in baseball


Kosmo profile image

Kosmo 4 years ago from California Author

You make a good point, Ken Michael. Any ballplayer who gets suspended for using PEDs should have his contract automatically cancelled or the owner should be given the legal option to do so. They should have awards, such as the MVP, taken away from them as well. Later!


jeolmoz2 profile image

jeolmoz2 3 years ago from Florida, USA

Sammy Sosa, Curt Schilling, Mark McGwire, Bud Selig, Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens…on and on goes the list. All summoned like commoners in front of the government to face accusations of steroid use in Major League Baseball, but MLB will survive....it's silly to even think that these were the ONLY! guys doping


Kosmo profile image

Kosmo 3 years ago from California Author

Thanks for the comment, jeolmoz2. You're right - many MLB players have doped yet never got caught, but they better not do it anymore or they'll probably get nabbed. Ask Melky, he knows. Later!


JPB0756 profile image

JPB0756 3 years ago

Well, old Hub, new question; has the author participated in college sports? Had he, or had he been at a competitive level, the question of steroids would be moot.


Kosmo profile image

Kosmo 3 years ago from California Author

The author hasn't been in organized sports, other than Cub Scouts Baseball. Does that quality? The point is not moot, I think. Later!


JPB0756 profile image

JPB0756 3 years ago

Later is now; you are a journalist and are without any idea as to my reference, or merely made touchy by truth. I relate to the purist, but when fame and fortune, in even N.C.A.A. ranks are both the way and the goal, one must be in the pool to be accepted as a swimmer, despite "words" to the opposite. I thank Dianabol for my mustache, as at 19 I was not able to grow one, if that is a broad enough hint. Everyone is on steroids, so it is already a level field, Had you actually been an athlete with the capacity to make money for your school.... oh, no, not the stark, even truth. Thanks.


darkprinceofjazz 2 years ago

It destroyed the record books, they are now pointless. For me that is the saddest thing of all. I always revered 755 and 61, now it's a joke. What will kill the game is generations of youngsters not giving a crap about the game. Over time that could ruin the game.


Kosmo profile image

Kosmo 2 years ago from California Author

Thanks for the comment, darkprinceofjazz. I'm afraid in the modern era of baseball most, if not all, statistics will be in question, particularly Barry Bonds' record for homers in a career. At any rate, let's keep playing ball. Later!


JPB0756 profile image

JPB0756 2 years ago

Kosmo, I enjoy your style and your provocative approach; realize that adage, "talk about me good, talk about me bad, just talk about me," explains the "powerlessness" acted out by sports owners. Having participated in NCCA sports may have prepared you to handle your peers' queries with knowledge, not prejudiced and hype, so whichever word other than "moot" chosen by you means the same. The major college athletic team that I was on won first place nationally every year I was there and everyone took steroids. Truth. 'When in Rome..." Hang in, Kosmo.


Kosmo profile image

Kosmo 2 years ago from California Author

Thanks for the comment, JPB0756. I'm not surprised that you were taking steroids while playing baseball during college. But are such players still doing so now? I couldn't say. At any rate, MLB players are still taking "roids," and this is very hard to believe. Later!


JPB0756 profile image

JPB0756 2 years ago

Thanks, Kosmo for the reply; actually, I was really surprised when I arrived at the school and was introduced to the practice, as I had taken no steroids prior to that, nor since...hmm, no records, either, lol. Thanks for your time.

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