The 5 Best Baseball Game Traditions

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Take Me Out to the Ball Game!

Honestly, is there anything much better in the world than going to a baseball game to watch your favorite team play? I didn't think so.

The sights and sounds at a baseball stadium are like nowhere else in the world and it is always a wonderful experience. It also doesn't hurt that the weather is usually warm and comfortable in the midst of summer, making the overall baseball game experience often all-around perfect.

Sometimes your team loses and sometimes your team wins, but no matter what, there are some baseball game traditions that occur every time you go to the ballpark. Maybe it is concessions, the seventh inning stretch, bringing a glove or going with your father or your own son.

Every baseball fan has their own game day routine, but these are my 5 Favorite Baseball Game Traditions:

5) The Seventh Inning Stretch

During every baseball game, after the visiting MLB team records the last out in the top of the seventh inning, the entire crowd stands up to sing and dance, and of course, stretch.

Every MLB stadium plays the classic baseball song "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" during the seventh inning stretch and others will play more songs that relate to the city or home team. In Milwaukee, “Roll Out the Barrel” plays every game in tribute to the city’s brewing history.

It can be pretty cool to see 30,000 to 50,000 grown men, women and children on their feet singing the songs and dancing around. Most of the men have probably had a little of “Tradition #4” by that point in time.

Beer, It's a Baseball Tradition

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4) Beer

Obviously, beer was not a baseball game tradition of mine as a child, as my father didn’t buy me Miller Lite when I was 8 years old. But now it has become a staple of every trip to the stadium.

Enjoying a beer out in the sun or the warm summer evening and watching your baseball team is so much fun and very relaxing.

If you don't like beer, a soda might do the trick, but I wouldn't recommend it.

What can I say, beer and baseball kind of just go together, especially at Miller Park in Milwaukee where millions of ounces of beer are sold every baseball game.

3) Tailgating

Tailgating and tailgate parties are also relatively new baseball game traditions for me.

I used to mainly just go to the stadium with my dad, and you usually want at least four to six people in order to have a tailgate party. But, to each their own.

Tailgating is a really fun way to get friends, family members or coworkers together before the baseball game starts and have a little party outside of the stadium.

Usually someone grills hamburgers and hot dogs, and everyone has a beer or two while talking, laughing or playing a tailgate game in the nice weather.

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2) Peanuts & Cracker Jack

I much prefer peanuts when going to a baseball game, but don’t mind a box of Cracker Jack from time to time.

The peanut vendors at the stadium have a little fun with their job and toss the bag to you from far away and shout as they run up and down the aisles.

It is nice to be able to crack open the peanut and just drop the shell on the floor by your seat. It’s kind of a bummer for the stadium cleaning crew, but I suppose they knew what they were getting into.

Peanuts go great with beer and don’t fill you up to much. I don’t think I have gone to a baseball game in years without having a bag of peanuts.

Hot Diggity Dog!

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1) Hot Dog

There is probably a law written somewhere that says you have to have at least one hot dog at every baseball game you go to. If not, there should be.

What’s funny, is typically a baseball stadium hot dog usually doesn’t even taste all that great, but for me, it is as firm of a baseball tradition as I know.

The best stadium hot dog I have had so far was the Fenway Frank at Fenway Park in Boston, but I have heard that the Dodger Dog in LA is the best.

Fans in Milwaukee often substitute a bratwurst or polish sausage for a hot dog, but to me that just isn’t baseball.

What are your favorite baseball game traditions?

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