WBC lightweight champion Edwin Valero was a monster in the ring

under the influence of alcohol and drugs. Valero killed his wife and later committed suicide

WBC lightweight champion Boxer Edwin Valero, 28, wife Jennifer, 24, with their children
WBC lightweight champion Boxer Edwin Valero, 28, wife Jennifer, 24, with their children

EDWIN VALERO, the monster in the ring

THE pride of Venezuela, WBC lightweight champion Boxer EDWIN VALERO, 28, joined his Maker last Monday, August 19, 2010, about 1:30 a.m. He was born on December 3, 1981. Valero killed himself by hanging with the use of his sweatpants from a bar on top of the ceiling inside his prison cell. This tragic incident happened barely hours after he was detained by Venezuelan Federal Police Officers on suspicion of killing his wife, Jennifer Carolina Viera, 24, who was discovered by police with 3 stab wounds in the hotel room in Valencia. It is alleged that Valero left the hotel room early dawn of Sunday and told the security guard on duty that he killed Jennifer Carolina Viera, said Venezuelan Federal Police Chief Wilmar Flores. This tragedy orphaned their children, Edwin, 8, and daughter Rosselin, 5

This tragic incident stunned the boxing world. Who would think that the youthful Venezuelan boxing world champion who’s almost on the peak of his career would commit suicide? With an impressive 24 straight wins, zero loss,18 of which all by first round knockout, what else did he miss in his career? Why? Let’s cite concrete facts about the life of the late boxer as bases for hypotheses why he cut his life short.

Edwin Valero was a household item in his country. He enjoyed a close friendship with a fierce critic of the US government and President of Venezuela Hugo Chavez who- at times- would invite him in his TV programs as guest and Chavez supporters would lionized him as a national hero. His loyalty to President Chavez was such that he had a big image of him boldly tattooed on his chest together with the flag emblem of his country. However- some critics accused him of trying to evade punishment committed in the past by befriending the powers-that-be

A few months back we heard the exciting news about the Pacquiao-Valero bout which was to be held supposedly in Macau because of the latter’s inability to fight within the USA. The fight didn’t materialize for reasons we don’t know. Perhaps Manny Pacquiao had the rare and only chance of seeing Edwin Valero alive in person when the latter together with Boxer David Diaz and other pugilists of note attended the former’s 2008 birthday in General Santos City. Hounded by the press about Valero’s untimely passing, Pacquiao was quick to say that he learned first of the killing of Valero's wife and was jolted beyond belief that this time it was the boxer himself who committed suicide. Pacquiao said that there must be a grave problem in the family as he expressed his heartfelt condolence to Valero’s bereaved family.

Despite earning distinct accolades, the late boxer was hounded by dark shadows. In 2001 Valero sustained cerebral hemorrhage due to a motorcycle incident. He failed to get a US boxing license because of his brain injury so he was banned from fighting within USA soil. He campaigned mainly in Japan and Latin America where he won his first title in 2006 The primary reason why he was denied a U.S. visa is that he was caught drunk while driving in Texas. Valero accused the US government of discrimination, saying his application was denied because of his link with Chavez.

Some media reporters pictured him as a monster both in and outside the ring.. His drunken, violent behavior led him to main, maltreat and kill his wife and to end his life by hanging. His manager Jose Castillo countered the opposite by saying people knew him well as a good caring, loving, loyal and helpful person when he's sober.

Here’s Valero’s rough beginnings and this is the part of the boxer’s life which most people don’t know.

Days before the incidents, Castillo being Valero's manager sensed that the boxer was in deep trouble which led him to take up drinking. He sensed that Valero got hooked in the alcohol drinking vice when his visa application was denied. During the burial rites of Valero's wife in El Vigia, W. Venezuela, Valero's mother-in-law Mary Finol told reporters that Edwin Valero was addicted to cocaine. Castillo and the Venezuelan leader Hugo Chavez who likewise knew of the boxer’s predicament, did everything to advise him to quit taking alcohol and perhaps other drugs. Valero himself admitted his predicament and admitted rehab. Castillo had seen the handwriting on the wall which made him hatched the plan of bringing Valero and his family to Los Angeles possibly to boost his boxing career and to help the boxer quit his dependence on drugs. He blamed the administration for not taking forceful steps to avert the tragedy.

Castillo advised that if one is to understand a movie well, he must view the movie completely from its beginning up to its ending; not from its middle part up to its ending only. So this is it. If you want to know why Valero killed his wife and why he committed suicide, you must know and understand his beginnings. At an early age Valero’s parent split up, leaving literally Valero out of the house at 12.years of age. Out on the streets, he learned how to steal in order to eat. For him, there was no other means to find food but to steal. From his local research and from data gathered from Valero himself, Castillo believed Valero was on his own on the streets at the early age of 7. This is perhaps one of the issues that haunted the boxer’s psyche

Valero’s rough childhood coupled with the denial of his visa application to the USA could have triggered his addiction to alcohol and drugs. He had access to all the vices he wants to for he had money from his winnings. When he was sober, he was meek as a lamb, kind, loyal and helpful to the needy. It is reported that he was a doting father to his wife and kids. However, while under the influence, he was a true picture of a monster who- without qualms- murdered his dear wife and later on snuffed his own dear life. The very reasons cited are perhaps the very same driving force why he’s a monster in the ring for sending to the canvass 18 foes all via the first round.

I guess this tragedy could have been more gruesome had their kids been there with them in the hotel. (Yahoo News/FanHouse/Boxing)

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