Colour me beautiful

Colour is vital for looking good and feeling confident. Colour also plays a really important role symbolically. For a witch, knowing colour correspondences take on a particularly strong meaning in terms of magical workings and spell crafting. Colour therapy is an art form that allows for balanced healing of the chakras. Colour, therefore, is a vital part of our lives in many, many ways. But knowing which colour is best suited for which skin tone can sometimes be a little daunting. Most people instinctively gravitate towards colours that work for them, but sometimes we are taught by our parents or friends to avoid certain tones or colours. For example, my best friend has a soft colouring. She had light brown hair that she's coloured red, hazel eyes, and until the colouring of her hair, little contrast between the colour of her hair, eyes and skin. I think she looks divine, but her colours are totally different from my own, which are much deeper and darker in tone.

So today, I shall use the wonderful guidebook titled Colour me confident by Veronique Henderson and Pat Henshaw and talk to you a little bit about colour for a particular type of skin-tone, my own.

First of course, one needs to figure out what type one is. Now in the book the different types are split into different sections. Before this used to be by season, then I was a winter. Now they have done away with seasons and have gone into 6 sections titled, Light, Warm, Clear, Deep, Cool and Soft.

A Deep, as I am will have the following characteristics. A Deep will have dark brown or black hair, dark eyes, dark eyebrows and lashes, and a skin tone from porcelain to black including all the shades in between. Most South Asians like myself, for instance, fall into the Deep category. Deeps are particularly good in black and should generally wear strong, dark colours near their face to balance their look.

So what colours can a Deep wear? The book gives you a guide list of 30 colours to work with. This is actually quite a lot of colours. Some of them are black, chocolate, charcoal, pewter, emerald green, purple and scarlet. All bright and dark tones. From the lighter palette a Deep can wear primrose, ivory, soft white and stone. According to the book Catherine Zeta-Jones is a perfect example of a Deep.

Investment buys according to the book should be made in black, dark navy, black-brown, pewter, charcoal and taupe. These colours are always ideal for staples such a suits, jackets, coats and trousers. Never wear pale or pastel shades on their own, advices the book, because it will make you pale and washed out. Indeed, following the book will always allow you to feel as though you are dressed in your best. Feeling confident is especially important in this day an age when image seems to matter and first impressions stand for so much.

I have a tendency to wear a lot of black since it is one of my favourite colours and is always a safe option. Using the book, however, I finally diversified and bought a royal purple winter jacket this season. Even my university professor said I looked good, and he's a man who has never, ever noticed or commented on my appearance. What a result.

Now, here's a full list of the 30 colours ideal for a Deep.

Soft white, ivory, stone, taupe, chocolate, black-brown, black, pewter, charcoal, primrose, lime, moss, fern, turquoise, teal, emerald green, pine, forest green, cornflower, true blue, dark navy, royal purple, purple, damson, blush pink, true red, scarlet, bittersweet, burgundy and aubergine.

The book then cleverly divides Deeps into two sections Deep and Warm and Deep and Cool. I am a Deep and Cool because my hair has an ebony tint to it when looked at in good light. Now of course, I dye it, but still, in its natural form, it does have an ebony tint. Deep and Cools also have either porcelain skin or olive or black skin with a slight blue tinge. Your eyes should be dark brown or ebony. To make sure, the book advices you to do a colour test holding salmon pink and fuchsia and again with olive and teal. If you are a Deep and Cool you will look better in the fuchsia and the teal. If on the other hand those colours just don't work then your skin has a warmer, more golden undertone to it. In that case your secondary characteristic is warm.

So, if like me you are a Deep and Cool, you get an additional 12 colours to compliment your cool colouring. These 12 are:

Pure white, peppermint, true green, dark teal, powder blue, periwinkle, violet, plum, candy, cyclamen, fuchsia and raspberry.

So there you have it. I hope this has been of some use, and if like me you are a Deep and Cool, welcome to your collection of colours. Do, and I can only tell you how rewarding it is to stop wearing colours that don't suit. I bagged up a few things that weren't in my colours and dropped them off at the charity shop down the road. I worried that I would miss them, but as I began to pack, I realised that instinctively, these were the clothes that I wore the least. We really do know what our colours are, we just need to go with our gut feeling and avoid being told what to wear by elders and friends who are perhaps a different type and so send us towards their choices. Good luck. Do let me know your thoughts.


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Rosie2010 profile image

Rosie2010 6 years ago from Toronto, Canada

Hiya our home witch, I am a Deep and Cool too. Although my hair is reddish brown now, my natural hair was black before the darn grey started sprouting up by the hundreds. I'm also olive skinned and have dark brown eyes. Definitely Deep and Cool. I better check my closet. But you're right, we just know which colours suit us.

Have a nice day,

Rosie


home witch profile image

home witch 6 years ago from Manchester Author

Hello,

Glad you took the time to leave a comment. We deep and cools are the first to show the signs of greying in our hair, unfortunately. Mine's gone a darkish brown now due to dying, but the colours do still apply if you don't move too far away from your original colour base.

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