Best Way to Store Loose Pigment Eye Shadows

Pigment Palette

Storing your pigments in this way can display exactly what colour of pigments you have.  I call this one my Rainbow Pigment Palette.
Storing your pigments in this way can display exactly what colour of pigments you have. I call this one my Rainbow Pigment Palette.

Full-size vs. Sample Size

Before I made these pigment palettes, I started purchasing pigments online. Pigments can be found at the websites listed below, and they sell pigments in full-size and sample size. Buying pigments in samples can save you money and allow you to try many colours. Full size pigments can cost anywhere from $5-20 whereas sample sizes range from $1-3 each. Sample size pigments come with just enough to fill each one of the little jars that make up the palette (shown on the right).

Choosing a Palette

I like using containers that are used for storing beads. These can be found at Michaels Arts and Crafts stores, and I have a provided a link to their website on the right-hand side. They have many different types, but typically they come with a large rectangular box and lid and inside are small jars. I like putting my pigments into each one of the smaller jars.

Your Work Area

Find a large desk that is clear of all items. Set down some paper towels and lay out your palette, jars and pigments. Make sure that you are in a well-ventilated room.

Small jar with the lid taken off.
Small jar with the lid taken off.
The label from the pigment sample has been peeled off and trimmed to fit the side of the jar. This helps you remember what colour/type of pigment is in each jar.
The label from the pigment sample has been peeled off and trimmed to fit the side of the jar. This helps you remember what colour/type of pigment is in each jar.
Label has been placed on the jar.
Label has been placed on the jar.
Pigment has settled and the corner of the bag is cut off.
Pigment has settled and the corner of the bag is cut off.

Get your Jar Ready

Take out one of the jars and unscrew the top. You can take the label from the pigment bag (if there is one) and trim it so that it will fit on the side of your jar.

You can clean out the jar if you prefer, using a Q-Tip dipped in rubbing alcohol and swirling it around inside the jar and the lid. Make sure the alcohol has dried completely before putting any pigment inside.

At this point, it is extremely important that you work in a well-ventilated room (or outside, weather permitting). The fumes from the alcohol and the air-borne pigment particles aren't good to be breathing in, so make sure you have some windows and doors open. Also, cover your mouth and nose with the collar of your shirt when working with the pigments as an extra precaution.

Transferring Pigments to Jars

Before transferring the pigments into the smaller jars, you will need:

-Your pigments and storage container of choice
-Scissors
-Paper towels
-A well-ventilated room
-Rubbing alcohol and Q-Tips

First, turn over the pigment bag so that the seal of the bag is pointing downwards. Shake the bag so the pigment settles down. Cut off one of the corners of the bag.

Working over paper towels, cover your mouth and nose with the collar of your shirt and begin to slowly pour the pigment into the jars. This can be messy, and you will likely get some pigment onto the paper towels. With most samples, you will have a bit left over anyways.

Carefully pour the pigment into the jar.
Carefully pour the pigment into the jar.
Lid has been securely screwed onto the jar.
Lid has been securely screwed onto the jar.

Finishing Touches

Once you have filled your jar, place the lid on top and set it aside. Fill other jars with other colours. If you have some pigment left over, experiment with mixing different colours together! Then place all your jars back into the palette container in any order you choose. I like arranging them by colour, but you can also arrange by type, brand or finish!

Not Just Pigments

You can also use this idea for storing other types of mineral makeup, such as mineral foundation, setting powders, or any left over makeup products!

If you have any pressed eye shadows that are almost gone, you can scrape out what you have left and mix it with other eye shadows to create new colours.

Other Palettes I've Made

Neutral colours, interfines and glitter.
Neutral colours, interfines and glitter.
My second Rainbow Pigment Palette
My second Rainbow Pigment Palette

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Comments 1 comment

Savannah 4 years ago

Thank you! I am about to go on a bit of a spending spree and really need some way to store all my goodies!

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