Jeans - the desire to wear it runs in the jeans?

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Here is the description of the characteristics of this fancy cloth:

  • The cloth is too rough
  • The cloth is too thick for tropical climates. If you wear it, there will be inadequate ventilation leading to perspiration and irritability in the skin.
  • The cloth has no anti-wrinkling properties. It will turn to look like a soaked and dried cardboard after a wash.
  • This cloth comes most predominantly in a single color --blue, and it is almost invariably faded. Sometimes it fades too fast and also disproportionately in some areas when you wash it.
  • This cloth being too thick at the stitched joints, has the potential to rub too harshly at the tender joints of the body and as a consequence, itching, skin abrasion and skin deceases like eczema will come sooner or later.
  • If at all this cloth is to be worn, it would be better if it is fitted loosely to reduce the discomfiture of wearing it. But it is rather customary to wear it skin-tight.
  • Indian women in general would like to wear modestly and this cloth when worn tightly reveals the shape of the body portion below waist rather in a provocative way as it is customary to wear it tight. But so many Indian girls whose body shape is too over-bloated too love to wear jeans and "show off"!
  • In the name of fashion, this cloth is also available in dress forms that look torn, badly stitched, or as if rubbed over rough rock.
  • This cloth is too heavy and most inconvenient to hand wash. Even machine washing is taxing for the washing machine.
  • The dresses made out of this cloth are never cheap.

Under normal, common-sense point of view, If the above is the facts-list about a particular cloth form, won't every body discard the cloth?

No! Everybody, all young men and women, irrespective of caste, culture and creed will fall head over heels to buy and wear it! It will hardly ever go out of fashion. It will be the one cloth form, one fashion statement acceptable to all countries around the globe.

Yes; You guessed it right -- It is the jeans!

A couple of years ago, I accompanied my daughter, a second year Engineering college student to her college hostel (located in a town in south India). While traveling in the train, a mother (aged about 38) and her teen-aged daughter were also traveling in the same coupe. Inevitable conversations lead to the revelation that the teen-aged girl was proceeding to the same college to join the first year.

Naturally, the girl and the mother were curious to know from my daughter about the hostel facilities, security, food, rules and regulations, do's and don'ts etc. My daughter while sharing her experience mentioned that wearing of Jeans inside the college is prohibited, but within the girls' hostel, there is no restriction. Immediately there was a look of shock and exasperation on one of the mother-daughter duo.

You guessed it wrong. The shock was not on the girl's face, but on her mother's face!

"Why, it is idiotic! Why should they curtail this freedom of choice from young girls? I never thought they will be so old fashioned".

The surprise did not end there for me. The teen aged daughter immediately said, "Why Ma? It is only with good intentions they have done so. We can any way wear it in hostel amidst girls. I don't see any problem".

On one way, I felt very happy that there is sense still prevailing in the younger generation. On another way, I could not understand the mother's mindset. Did she belong to a generation where her aspirations to look 'modern' by wearing jeans were thwarted by her parents? Has she developed a mindset, as a consequence, that her daughter should have all the freedom to wear jeans, even if the daughter herself is not too curious about it?

What is this inexplicable magic that faded cloth has got? Can anyone explain?

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Deepika Arun profile image

Deepika Arun 4 years ago from Chennai, India

Is this your shortest hub so far?


C.V.Rajan profile image

C.V.Rajan 4 years ago from Kerala, India Author

Ama ille?

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    Disillusioned (C.V.Rajan)325 Followers
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    C.V.Rajan is a retired Engineer and a spiritual seeker. He writes on a variety of subjects that interest him.



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