Oris Artelier Culture Swiss Wrist Watches Review

Oris Artelier: Master Collection

Oris Artelier Culture is the master Oris collection: all the watchmaker's complications and technological achievements are in it.

The approach of amassing all complications into one separate collection is not new – Patek Philippe did it with the Complications line – but Oris Artelier is different in that it introduces several features that recur throughout the collection.

Oris Atelier watches usually sport a shine polished multi-circled dial (reminds me of F.P. Journe watches) with triangular indices – doubled at twelve o'clock; beautiful dagger-shaped hands; some complication. Though the actual design can change depending on the complication and color, this is the basic configuration. Some models display classic Art Deco lines.

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Oris Artleier CalendarOris Artleier AutomaticOris Artleier Two ToneOris Artleier SkeletonOris Artleier Strap
Oris Artleier Calendar
Oris Artleier Calendar
Oris Artleier Automatic
Oris Artleier Automatic
Oris Artleier Two Tone
Oris Artleier Two Tone
Oris Artleier Skeleton
Oris Artleier Skeleton
Oris Artleier Strap
Oris Artleier Strap

Design

Exceptions include Artelier Skeleton, the openworked model, and Artelier Date Diamonds, the feminine version with diamonds set instead of the regular indices, large painted Arabic numerals adorning the dial.

Once again, this collection draws inspiration from high-end mechanical watchmakers, but adds enough original touches of its own to keep it at the inspiration level. Harmony of design as principal Oris trait guides dial compositions.

Straps and Bracelets

As in other Culture collections, Artelier offers pieces with black and white faces and in bracelet and strap variations. However, unlike in Oris Rectangular line, some watches look better with straps while others really shine only with bracelets.

The reason for the difference lies in design subtleties: thickness of the bezels and slight alteration in case shape – these “little” things define the timepiece more clearly, thereby rendering it either a “strap” or a “bracelet” watch. It must be said that some models look considerably worse when equipped with an unsuitable wristlet, so use the website visuals, or, better yet, compare versions “in the metal.”

Complications

Oris is not a complication oriented watchmaker, but it shows some stuff in the Artelier. The openworked piece is a bold move considering the formidable competition (such as Vacheron Constantin, an award winning expert on openworked wrist watches). Movement complications include: dual time, alarm, chronograph, pointer date, pointer day and moon phases.

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