Tiffany Jewelry Rings Review: Sterling Silver, Gold, Platinum, Diamonds

Precious Metals

Tiffany gold, silver and platinum rings make up a vast department of over 300 items of various sizes, purposes, and prices. Engagement rings constitute a separate category – they tend to adhere to strictly classic design precepts, rarely taking risks; in a way, the luxury they demonstrate is a risk of its own.

The majority of Tiffany's rings don't have to follow these strict principles. Paloma Picasso, Elsa Peretti, and other jewelry makers who collaborated with the brand had artistic freedom to reevaluate various formal design ideas – producing an array of fresh, exotic, surprising pieces that emulate the most avant-garde creations on the market.

Balancing the wilder rings are Tiffany's established collections: Signature, 1837, and others. With time, the former type transposes into the latter.

Tiffany Diamond Ring | Photo credit:  Tiffany & Co.
Tiffany Diamond Ring | Photo credit: Tiffany & Co.

Sterling Silver

Sterling silver rings, sometimes almost like smaller copies of the bracelets, sometimes bearing a more generalized resemblance to other Tiffany jewelry, make up about a third of the entire inventory. Two main design approaches rely either on semi-precious stones (amethyst, citrine, quartz, jade, chrysoprase, chalcedony, onyx, praseolite – set in cocktail, Sugar Stacks and other lines), or on elaborate metal ornamentation.

Strictly metal pieces display intricate metalwork and scrollwork that substitutes the crystals, adding touches of elegance or more abstract expressiveness, depending on the model. Familiar collections include Somerset and Notes.

Gold

Tiffany gold rings tend to feature multi-layered designs: even the simplest band-like items contain diamond injections that echo wedding bands; more complex lines erect and shuffle diamonds, resulting in luscious compositions. Golden rings are also among the company's most colorful pieces, owing to the metals saturated yellow hue.

Platinum

Combines with gold and gemstones, or as a platform for calmer creations. Platinum responds well to figurative designs, and will often feature miniature (and paved with diamonds) hearts, snowflakes, leaves, and other motifs. Being a difficult metal to work with platinum proves Tiffany's prowess in jewelry, and especially ring making.

More by this Author


Click to Rate This Article
working