Panasonic Lumix G3 First Looks

Panasonic Lumix G3

Lumix G3 and Micro Four Thirds Lens
Lumix G3 and Micro Four Thirds Lens
The newly developed 16.0-megapixel Live MOS sensor for the DMC-G3
The newly developed 16.0-megapixel Live MOS sensor for the DMC-G3

Successor to the G2

I've written about my experiences with the Micro Four Thirds camera from Panasonic the Lumix DMC-G2. What's attractive about this mirror-less SLR systems is the compact size. By doing away with the mirror and prism assembly of the traditional SLR camera, the Micro Four Thirds format offered by Olympus and Panasonic, the resulting cameras are much less bulky then full sized DSLRs say from Nikon or Cannon.

Since the lens assembly is much closer to the sensor on these cameras the lens are also smaller and lighter. The effective magnification makes a 20 mm Micro Four Thirds lens equivalent to a 40 mm regular lens. Basically you double the size of any lens to figure out its equivalent.

Now the sensor size on the G2 was bigger than those found in point and shoot cameras but not as large as those found in full sized DSLR camera. With the introduction of the new Panasonic Lumix G3 the sensor size has been increased.

Compared to the G2, the G3 is actually lighter and smaller than the G2 while the sensor size has been increased from 12 megapixels (typically 10mp in practice in popular image sizes) to 16 megapixels. Burst shooting has been speed up to 4 frames per second on the G3 as compared to 3.2 on the G2.

The G3 also offers an advanced iA (intelligent mode) function that allows enables de-focusing control area, exposure compensation and white balance to be adjusted with a simple touch control for achieving better result. The initial offering price on the G3 is actually $100 less than the initial offering price on the G2.

Bummer that I just bought my G2 a few months ago and now they have me foaming at the mouth for the new G3. Is Christmas really that far away?

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