Symbols of Signs - HTML Code for Common Symbols

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When putting symbols and characters on your website, you might find that you need to use HTML to get the job done. This specific kind of HTML code is called special entity codes.

There are a huge number of symbols -- seriously, the list of the different characters you can use seemingly goes on forever. This is a collection of some of the most commonly used characters, so that you can quickly find exactly what you need.

You might be wondering why a list like this would ever be needed, especially for characters such as an exclamation point. Characters are used in programming code. Because of this, when you type out an exclamation point, it might not show up. To get it to show up, you'll have to use some HTML code to specifically tell computers not to run the characters like code, but rather display them on-screen.

Feel free to use this as a handy reference chart. Bookmark this so you can have it next time you need it (when you edit your website, blogs, etc.) Having this list on hand can be a real lifesaver!

Don't forget that you absolutely must end every special entity code with a semicolon. This works as a way to tell the computer that you're done with that specific set of instructions.

Symbols and HTML Code

Name
Symbol
Code
Exclamation point
!
!
Slash
/
/
Caret
^
^
Left parenthesis
(
(
Right parenthesis
)
)
Tilde
~
~
Semicolon
;
&#59;
Less than
<
&#60;
Greater than
>
&#62;
At sign
@
&#64;
Plus sign
+
&#43;
Number sign (or hash)
#
&#35;
Period
.
&#46;
Equal sign
=
&#61;
Left square bracket
[
&#91;
Right square bracket
]
&#93;
Backslash
\
&#92;
Percent sign
%
&#37;
Apostrophe
'
&#39;
Multiplication sign
×
&#215;
Left curly brace
{
&#123;
Right curly brace
}
&#125;
Hyphen (or minus sign)
-
&#45;
Comma
,
&#44;
Asterisk
*
&#42;
Vertical bar
|
&#124;
Accent
`
&#96;
Underscore
_
&#95;
Quote
"
&quot;
Colon
:
&#58;
Division sign
÷
&#247;
Ampersand
&
& amp;
Question mark
?
&#63;
Dollar sign
$
&#36;
Space
 
&#32;
Broken vertical bar
¦
&#166;
Bullet point
&#8226;
Copyright
©
&#169;
Degree
°
&#176;
Inverted question mark
¿
&#191;
Paragraph
&#182;
Plus-minus
±
&#177;
Registered
®
&#174;
Trademark
&#8482;
Euro
&#8364;
Pound
£
&#163;
Middle dot
·
&#183;
Cents
¢
&cent;
Not equal to
&ne;
Left arrow
&larr;
Right arrow
&rarr;
Up arrow
&uarr;
Down arrow
&darr;

It's also handy to have the HTML code for numbers and letters on hand. I've created a handy chart below which shows letters and numbers that you can use as a reference chart.

HTML Code for Numbers

Name
Symbol
Code
Zero
0
&#48;
One
1
&#49;
Two
2
&#50;
Three
3
&#51;
Four
4
&#52;
Five
5
&#53;
Six
6
&#54;
Seven
7
&#55;
Eight
8
&#56;
Nine
9
&#57;

How to Use Special Entity Codes

Whenever you find yourself in need of special entity codes, you can just paste them where you need them. Special entity codes must ALWAYS start with an ampersand and end with a semicolon. All the above codes contain this, so if you copy and paste it on your site correctly, it should work.

You can usually paste this right on your site or by going to your HTML editor. If, for some reason, it doesn't work, make sure you're not using a WYSIWYG editor. WYSIWYG editors can make it so that the code itself appears on your page and not the desired character, so be careful of this.

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