Taking Down An Antenna Tower

Dropping a Tower

Dropping an antenna tower can be a risky process.
Dropping an antenna tower can be a risky process.
Find a hard point and attach a cable or rope from the top of the tower to a come-along attached to the hard point.
Find a hard point and attach a cable or rope from the top of the tower to a come-along attached to the hard point. | Source
Find a second hard point and attach another cable or rope to the top of the tower and a come-along attached to a tree or post or hardpoint.
Find a second hard point and attach another cable or rope to the top of the tower and a come-along attached to a tree or post or hardpoint.
Detach or cut the legs at the base.
Detach or cut the legs at the base.
Cut the guy wires on the same side as the cable or rope.
Cut the guy wires on the same side as the cable or rope.
Secure the base of the legs so they don't slide toward the lowering ropes.
Secure the base of the legs so they don't slide toward the lowering ropes. | Source
Loosen the come-alongs a half turn at a time to lower the tower to the ground.
Loosen the come-alongs a half turn at a time to lower the tower to the ground.
Once down, cut loose the cables and guy wires.
Once down, cut loose the cables and guy wires.

Safely Lowering an Antenna Tower

Taking down an old or damaged antenna tower can be a difficult job. If you can afford to hire a crane, do so, but if the tower isn't more than 25 or 30 feet you can safely lower the tower if you take some simple precautions.

Start by finding a pair of separated hard points on one side of the tower to tie your lowering ropes to. A post or tree or other solid attachment point gives you a place to hook up a come-along. If you don't know what that is, it's a hand winch with cable attached that allows you to tighten and loosen the cable by cranking a lever back and forth. Get one with enough cable to equal the height of the tower. If you don't have a large enough come-along to hold that much cable, you'll have to use temporary braces and reattach the come-alongs as you go. You don't want to do that.  If you have a 40 foot tower, have a winch that will handle 40 feet of cable.

Once you've rigged up the lowering ropes and come-alongs, tie down the legs to a stake or hardpoint on the opposite side toward where the tower will fall. This way the legs don't slide toward the guys on the lowering ropes and hurt somebody when you lean the tower over. Now unbolt the legs from the base or cut them free with a metal cutting rig or torch. Leaving the guy wires in place prevents the tower from falling when the legs are cut.

Now, cut the guy wires on the same side as the lowering ropes and leave the guy wire attached on the side toward which the tower will fall. Begin letting out the come-alongs and let the tower begin to lean over. Work the come-alongs simultaneously if you have help or let out a few turns at a time on each side.

Lay the tower all the way down and then cut it free and haul it away.

Good luck with that bad boy!

Tom King - Flint, TX


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Comments 6 comments

twayneking profile image

twayneking 3 years ago from Puyallup, WA Author

Point taken, Jack. We're talking about the TV towers that people used to have when they lived way out in the country before there was cable. They seldom run much more than a couple or three stories high and the reason you're taking them down is because you don't want them anymore - the operative words being "old or damaged". We're not talking about 200 foot tall TV station antennas here. We're talking about a farmer scrapping an old antenna he doesn't need anymore because he bought DISH Network. And these towers are not really the kind you want to climb for any reason. If there's room you can unbolt them and push them over - good clean redneck fun that! Otherwise, you need to control how they fall and this is one way to do that. I suppose you could climb it and disassemble it or hire someone to do it, but why would you want to put the thing back up? Maybe if you were buying an old tower to reuse as a broadcast antenna tower for your ham radio station or something you might want to hire the crane. But even being careful, I wouldn't climb an old or damaged TV tower for however much you wanted to pay me - especially at my current tonnage.


Jack 3 years ago

This is a fine method if you are throwing the tower away or scrap. It will not be used again even if lowered slowly, they are not designed to have sideways stress. I would not climb a tower that fell!


twayneking profile image

twayneking 4 years ago from Puyallup, WA Author

Probably taking one down so far as the danger is concerned. The temptation is to cut it down and run out of the way, but usually the terrain won't allow a tower like that to free fall safely. If you take care and precautions as shown you should be okay, just don't do short cuts. I was a rigger for Brown and Root at one time and we raised and dropped some incredible stuff. Mostly it's a matter of rigging the equipment properly.


usvirginislands profile image

usvirginislands 4 years ago

Interesting article, would you say it is more difficult to put one up or take one down?


twayneking profile image

twayneking 4 years ago from Puyallup, WA Author

Thanks. Somebody had to take one down and having done some time as a rigger, I put together a step by step for next time. I wish I'd take pictures.


TVantennainstalls 4 years ago

You are one of the few who actually have an article discussing how to take down a TV antenna tower. There is plenty of info on the internet for erecting one... that's for sure. It's good that consumers can find this type of information to make this job safe and done right.

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