ASCII Codes Extended Bits and Tables

Introduction

Welcome to my second hub while I'm on my learning adventure! This time I'm going to be talking about ASCII codes. This hub is going to be short and simple but can be used as a reference if for some reason you ever do need an ASCII chart.

ASCII

ASCII, American Standard Code for Information Interchange, is a scheme used for assigning numeric values to punctuation marks, spaces, numbers and other characters. ASCII uses 7 bits to represent characters. The values 000 0000 through 111 1111 or 00 through 7F are used giving ASCII the ability to represent 128 different characters. An extended version of ASCII assigns characters from 80 through FF.

Standard and Extended ASCII chart

Standard ASCII
Standard ASCII | Source
Extended ASCII
Extended ASCII | Source

Encrypted Messages

ASCII codes represent characters and those characters can be rewritten in ASCII form. Take a look at the examples below and check them out on the ASCII chart yourself.

4D
69
63
65
20
6C
69
6B
65
20
63
68
65
65
73
65
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
See if you can decipher this. Answer is at the end of the hub

ASCII code can also be used to represent numbers. Numbers that are represented by ASCII codes are different than their binary representations i.e. 31 in ASCII is 3331 and in binary it is 11111. A date can be represented with ASCII characters, however the computer uses the ASCII representation of numbers for input and output purposes and the binary representation for internal computations.

4A
75
6E
65
20
32
31
20
31
39
38
30
J
u
n
e
space
2
1
space
1
9
8
0
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Conclusion

ASCII codes are used by the computer to represent characters for input output operations. An ASCII table lists all the ASCII codes and their respective characters. The ASCII coding scheme contains codes to represent numbers which are used differently than the binary representations of the same number.

Answer To Encrypted Message

Mice like cheese

References

Detmer, R. (2010). 80x86 Assembly Language and Computer Architecture. Sadbury: Jones and Bartlett Publishers

Comments 1 comment

Andrew Murillo 5 years ago

Cool.

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