10 God Forsaken Places with a Creepy Story

Do You Believe in Supernatural Places as we See in Creepy Movies?

The world is full of abandoned buildings, but some places are more interesting than others. History has given the following scary places a creepy aura that comes across even in these photos, never mind actually being there. Personally, the photos are enough for me...

Bodie (USA)


The American city near San Francisco in 1861 experienced a gold rush boom. After finding a profitable gold mine, the city grew rapidly, but it was a short-lived fad. Bodie at the time had a reputation as one of the wildest and most lawless towns of the West yet to be. When the gold mine grew no more profit, the city fell. The few remaining residents disappeared after a major fire in 1932. Strange but true: The same gold mining town of Bodie in Washington State just suffered the same fate.

Kolmanskop (Namibia)


In 1908 Kolmanskop diamonds were found, which gave the city of sudden wealth. Despite extremely inhospitable conditions outside was a city where there was pure hardship, including a factory for the production of block ice for the residents. Kolmanskop was regarded as the richest city in Africa. When the diamond mining was discontinued in 1930, leaving the inhabitants of the city in the desert, where in the ruins of the sand piles up today meters high. Since the 1990's a museum has cropped up in Kolmanskop to reveal it's once-boom-town past.

Prypiat (Ukraine)


The city Prypiat was built in 1970 for the workers of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. After the Chernobyl disaster, the 50,000 residents were evacuated from the city, but only after 36 hours, after which many of them were now suffering from early effects of radiation. Since it was first called, the evacuation would be only for a few days, but they never did let the people back, hence a lot of personal things that are found there today. A few days after the accident, a fair was going to be opened, so that in the ghost town of a Ferris wheel and bumper cars are still found...now only the ghosts can ride them.

Beelitz (Germany)


The large hospital building in Berlin was built in 1898-1930 and home a sanatorium for the treatment of non-communicable diseases. In the first and second world war, the complex was used as a military hospital, 1916, and Adolf Hitler was among the in-mates (or patients). After the Second World War the building served as a Soviet military hospital and provided in the 1990's help liver cancer patients, including Erich Honecker.

Maunsell Sea Forts (Great Britain)


No these are not Alien-Tripods but rather The Maunsell Sea Forts which are artificial platforms and fortified towers that were created in World War II coastal defense against the German air force used. They are in the estuary of the River Thames. After the war, the stations were closed down and abandoned since the late 50's final. Gradually, some platforms were lost in storms or collisions. In the 60 years were occupied as pirate radio towers.

Centralia (USA)


Centralia is a town in the vicinity of Pennsylvania, which was until the 1960s the coal mining industry and had about 2,000 inhabitants. 1962--a fire in the city of coal began, and it burns continuously since then. The government has been trying since 1965 to extinguish the fire, but so far without success. 70 million U.S. dollars have been spent on attempts to extinguish it. Due to the coal fire, the region was virtually uninhabitable, and there lived there in 2007 only 20 residents. Centralia was a model for the fictional town of "Silent Hill" in the feature film.

Craco (Italy)


IN the picturesque, medieval city Craco in 1963 a landslide destroyed many houses and tore into the valley with them. There, they built the city under the name Peschiera Craco. The old, dilapidated Craco is now completely deserted, but was impressive backdrop of some theater productions, such as "Quantum of Solace" and "The Passion of the Christ".

Humberstone (Chile)


1872, the Humberstone Saltpeter established and until a few years ago they were among the largest in Chile. Collapsed in 1930, but returned to the production until closed in 1961 Today, the factory abandoned in the harsh Atacama desert. The widespread theft of timber contributed to the fact that most buildings are under threat of collapse. Nevertheless, the rusty industrial ruins are a popular tourist destination since 2005 and World Heritage Site.

Hashima Iceland (Japan)


The Japanese island, which belongs to the city of Nagasaki, was until 1974 an undersea coal mining area. In the second world war there were 1300 Chinese and Korean slave laborers worked to death and were buried or thrown into the sea. 1959 around 83 476 inhabitants were living on one square kilometer. In 1974 the works were shut down, the workers left the island suddenly, leaving behind a lot of personal things. 2009, the island with the dilapidated buildings for tourists has been re-opened. I don't know what state it is in now after the Tsunami.


Oradour-sur-Glane (France)


The French town near Bordeaux during World War II, where the massacre at Oradour on 10th was announced in June 1944. The Germans burned the place down completely in the destruction of 642 residents came painfully to die, only six survived. After the war, a new town was built next to the destroyed. The remains of the old village are now memorial

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Comments 5 comments

mecheshier profile image

mecheshier 4 years ago

I love this Hub. There is some great information here. I also enjoyed the pics. I scored it as awesome.


xanzacow profile image

xanzacow 4 years ago from North Myrtle Beach, SC

Voted up and interesting!


AnnRandolph profile image

AnnRandolph 4 years ago

Good job, Buzzbee. I enjoyed the read.


backporchstories profile image

backporchstories 4 years ago from Kentucky

Awesome collection of sites!


Buzzbee profile image

Buzzbee 4 years ago from The County of the Winkies in Oz Author

mecheshierr: Hey that's what I like to hear! Happy readers!

xan: thank you!

AnnR: come again!

back: Your are too kind! :)

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