50. Australian Road Trip: Perth & Fremantle

Perth & Fremantle

A Tale of Two Cities

The last time we were in a place that resembled a city was over two months ago. The city was Darwin, almost 3000 road miles to the north. Now we are in Perth, capital of the huge state of Western Australia. Well, actually we have gravitated directly to the port city of Fremantle on the mouth of the Swan River, about 20km west of Perth city centre.

We like Fremantle; we like it a lot. I always knew I would like it; I almost headed here during the 80’s when it was booming with Alan Bond and the America’s Cup victory and all that – heady days - but I ended up in England instead. Upon our arrival we go straight to the tourist information office in Fremantle city centre. We want to spend some time in the big smoke and as the nights are becoming cold, and we are finally fed up with camping, we rent a smart warehouse apartment in the old port city for a week, determined to enjoy ourselves in comfort.

Fremantle Gallery

The Roundhouse, overlooking the historic city of Fremantle
The Roundhouse, overlooking the historic city of Fremantle
A typical street vista
A typical street vista
One of the portside beaches on a cool blustery day
One of the portside beaches on a cool blustery day
Victoriana
Victoriana

Fremantle - Livable City

Looking at the Greater Perth/Fremantle area as a whole, there is much to recommend this west coast metropolis as an ideal place to live – Fremantle being top of the list as far as I am concerned. The old port is full of character, with most of its colonial architecture still standing proudly, gleaming in the strong west coast sunlight. There is something about Fremantle - the network of streets, the early Victorian pubs, even the castle-like ‘Roundhouse’ overlooking the city - that reminds me of my current place of residence – Norwich in England. It is the compactness of the city, the comfortable mix of old and new, and the inherent friendliness of the inhabitants that appeals to me immediately.

We lap up the café culture, or at least slurp flat whites and satiate our munchies with panninis and assorted trendy snacks. We ride the Free Bus around its circular route through the Fremantle suburbs and on the second day we catch the train into Perth City Centre.

Perth City

Perth is modern, pedestrianised and fast paced. There is nothing wrong with it, except that it could be any modern, affluent metropolis. I could easily get to like it, especially if I had time to explore beyond the CBD. While Sheila treats herself to a hair cut in Tony & Guy, I make the most of being on my own to wander up and down the long busy streets, getting my bearings and a developing a taste for the place.

Market Force

One of the entrances to the wonderful Fremantle market
One of the entrances to the wonderful Fremantle market | Source

A Liveable City

Esplanade Hotel
Esplanade Hotel
Caf culture
Caf culture
Victorian streetscape
Victorian streetscape
Our overwhelmingly colourful warehouse flat (short-term lease via Tourist Info)
Our overwhelmingly colourful warehouse flat (short-term lease via Tourist Info)

A busker - Just a beggar with a guitar?

On our third day I go busking in the pedestrianised part of Fremantle high street. It is quite good fun, strumming away on my six string, belting out a few of my favourite songs to an unsuspecting and reasonably generous passing parade of shoppers and sightseers. I even meet a couple of local musicians who make me feel welcome in their city. I could easily live here, no problems. One of the main sights of Fremantle is the Market - a busy, bustling place, set in its original Victorian building with ornate cast iron filigrees, stained glass windows, skylights and ceiling fans. You can get anything here, from cool clothing to fresh fruit and fish. There are several good pubs surrounding the building too – and don’t worry – I checked them all out during our stay.

The road beckons again

Fremantle living – some nights we go out for dinner; others, we cook in the apartment. We also take in the wonderful maritime museum. Australia has always been linked to the sea and there are some great nautical exhibits here, and some incredible stories to be told.

After all we have been through over the past few months – cyclones, floods, extreme heat, insect hell, and breakdowns - our sojourn in Fremantle feels like a dream and at night a cold, knife blade of a wind blows through the streets reminding us that we at the south western edge of a vast continent with nothing between us and South Africa but the Indian Ocean. We must move on soon, and there is still width of Australia, including the vast Nullabor Plain, to cross before we see the Pacific Ocean and hometown Sydney again.

A Post Script to the West Coast: The Maritime Museum and a movie I'd like to see

The Story of the Wreck of the Batavia

The Fremantle Maritime Museum, throws up some interesting artifacts and bizarre tales. None more so than the story of the Wreck of the Batavia. The Batavia was a merchant ship of the Dutch East India Company (VOC) carrying 322 souls. On the 4th june 1629 it struck a reef on the Houtman Abrolhos Island group, situated about 80kms offshore from Geralton, WA. A few folks drowned but most survived. A small group including Captain Jacobsz and Commander Pelsaert, along with a handful of crew, set out in a longboat in a futile attempt to find fresh water on another island. As it turned out they kept going and in an amazing feat of seamanship, they sailed the small boat all the way to the Dutch settlement of Batavia (now Jakata) in Indonesia, with no loss of life. There, Pelsaert was given another boat by the authorities and set out to rescue the remaining survivors from the shipwreck.

A bit of Batavia

Model of the Batavia
Model of the Batavia
A section of the hull of the Batavia and a reconstructed archway, used as ballast.
A section of the hull of the Batavia and a reconstructed archway, used as ballast.
The skeletal ribs of the Batavia's hull
The skeletal ribs of the Batavia's hull
A victim of the massacre
A victim of the massacre

Meanwhile, back on the Houtmans, the man left in charge, Jeronimus Cornelisz, staged an evil coup. First he tricked the ship's marines by sending them to an isolated island where he left them stranded, and then he seduced a group of fellow nutters to rape, murder and butcher anyone who might thwart his evil plans to set up his own 'kingdom.' The butchery continued until at least 110 men, women and children were massacred by Cornelisz and his henchmen.

Meanwhile, the soldiers who had been stranded on another island had actually found good food and water supplies and were eventually alerted to the massacres by some people who had managed to escape from Cornelisz. The soldiers, led by Wiebbe Hayes built a rudimentary fort out of coral on their island, and eventually Cornelisz tried to take them as his supplies were running low. There were several 'battles' resulting in the capture of Cornelisz by the soldiers. The remaining mutineers once again assaulted the soldier's island but Commander Pelsaert returned from Indonesia just in time to rescue them.

A trial was held on the island and the conspirators were hanged. The evil Mr Cornelisz had both his hands chopped off before being strung up. A couple of the lesser conspirators were spared and marooned on the mainland. Many years later, light -skinned aborigines were spotted, giving rise to the idea that these men had surivived and flourished, although there have been many other Dutch shipwrecks along the west coast in those long ago days.

There were only 68 survivors remaining to rescue from the original shipwreck, but what a story, I can't wait to see the film (Why hasn't someone made a movie of this yet? Or maybe they have?). You can find the full, detailed story on wikipedia of course.

More by this Author


Comments 10 comments

Matt in Jax profile image

Matt in Jax 5 years ago from Jacksonville, FL

Lots of nice photos and commentary!


saltymick profile image

saltymick 5 years ago Author

Thanks for reading it Matt, and commenting too.


gogogo 5 years ago

great article, and excellent photos


saltymick profile image

saltymick 5 years ago Author

Thanks gogogo, glad you liked it.


Karanda profile image

Karanda 5 years ago from Australia

That apartment must have felt like a palace after your camping adventures down the west coast. Fremantle is something special isn't it? My favourite part of Perth for sure. Another great Hub from you Saltymick. Looking forward to following you along the Nullabour.


saltymick profile image

saltymick 5 years ago Author

You're right Karanda.... I love roughing it, camping etc, but this flash apartment was pure luxury and right in the heart of Fremantle too.


AussieMike 5 years ago

G'day Mate, Just checked in again on your blog. Almost brought tears to my eyes, as we (my Beloved and I) used to visit the Freo Museum at least twice a month when we lived in Scarborough. We also had the thrill of watching the construction of the Endeavour Replica and saw it leave on it's maiden voyage from Freemantle. Imagine our surprise a couple of years later when we visited Whitby (Yorkshire) and saw the Endeavour again!

Keep up the great blog!


Claudia Tello profile image

Claudia Tello 4 years ago from Mexico

Great Hub, beautifully formatted: the perfect complement for my Western Australia Photo Gallery and Travel Hub. Thanks for sharing!!!


Perthtopbars 2 years ago

Nice Hub. WA really is beautiful


saltymick profile image

saltymick 2 years ago Author

Thanks for the positive feedback everyone. I wrote this hub several years ago but I bet Perth and Fremantle are still just as wonderful as they were when we visited them. I must return!

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working