Above the Red Dirt of Oklahoma

Port Silt Loam: The official dirt of Oklahoma!

Blue sky with fluffy white clouds over red dirt.  Red, white and blue are true adjectives describing Oklahoma.  Photo taken of I-35 going north from Edmond, looking toward Highway 66 to Arcadia Red Barn and POPS.
Blue sky with fluffy white clouds over red dirt. Red, white and blue are true adjectives describing Oklahoma. Photo taken of I-35 going north from Edmond, looking toward Highway 66 to Arcadia Red Barn and POPS. | Source

The red dirt of Oklahoma is officially named "Port silt loam" after a small town in the midst of rural farm country. It is a flood-plain rich soil benefiting cotton farms, peanut and corn crops among other varied food production. Not all soil in Oklahoma is red, but it is best known for this staining hard-to-wash-out variety of dirt.

An Enduring History

Oklahoma recorded history began in 1541 as Spanish explorer Coronado ventured prairies and hills of this land, one of the younger states in the USA. Land that would be known as Indian Territory and later as Oklahoma, was part of the historical 1803 Louisiana Purchase of over 800,000 thousand acres bought from France. Oklahoma became the 46th state in November 1907, and bears the nickname ‘Sooner State’, relating to its land run history when some ‘early birds’ tried to grab their free 160 acres before the proper starting signal.

The very meaning of our state’s name is from the Choctaw words: Okla, meaning people; and humma, meaning red, and honors our heritage of Indian ancestries which include more than sixty-seven different tribes.

Map of 1880s era of Indian Territories

Source
James Earle Fraser's 'End of the Trail'
James Earle Fraser's 'End of the Trail' | Source
The National Cowboy and Western Museum entry way.  This was a rainy day...we welcomed it!
The National Cowboy and Western Museum entry way. This was a rainy day...we welcomed it! | Source

Remembering the Past

The tragically famed Cherokee ‘Trail of Tears’ ended in Oklahoma as our government unjustly forced native peoples from their ancestral home in southern areas of the USA to travel on foot, relocating west. Thousands died on that disastrous journey, but survivors and descendants of those brave peoples in Oklahoma overcame and rebuilt a new world: They remain a proudly successful foundation of current society in Oklahoma.

James Earle Fraser’s life-sized plaster statue in the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum is an emotional depiction of that trail of suffering; an unforgettable portrayal, a visual image of tragedy!

The National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City is well worth a visit with its antique and historical exhibits, convention room paintings, and fascinating information of pioneer lifestyle.

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Indian heritage is foundational in Oklahoma.

Jim Thorpe is a famous athlete of Sac and Fox Indian heritage from Oklahoma. His athletic endeavors were known world-wide. The famed illiterate syllabarist, Sequoyah, is a now honored scholar of Cherokee heritage, though he was disfigured for life when some thought he practiced witchcraft with his ‘talking leaves’ in forming the Cherokee alphabet. He was half Cherokee, born in Tennessee moving to Oklahoma later in life. His one-room cabin near Sallisaw was enclosed in a protective building and maintained by the Oklahoma Historical Society. In 1966 it was designated as a National Historic Landmark.

Cowboys and Indians are still 'real' in Oklahoma.

After the Civil War, Oklahoma joined in a booming cattle industry which ushered in our famous cowboy era, and eventually the related modern slang, ‘Redneck’. Settlement of this new state was furthered by holding six land runs between 1889 & 1895 as opportunistic settlers came from eastern USA and several foreign countries to establish pioneering franchises. Free land and hard living were our primal foundation.

Pictures of Kinetic Progression

An actual wagon that ran in a 'Land Run' for property in Oklahoma.  Displayed in the Oklahoma Historical Museum.
An actual wagon that ran in a 'Land Run' for property in Oklahoma. Displayed in the Oklahoma Historical Museum. | Source
This sandstone outcrop is what pioneer covered wagons had to travel over and around.
This sandstone outcrop is what pioneer covered wagons had to travel over and around. | Source
This is a newer cowboy hat and had a good-looking cowboy underneath, but I did not get permission to show his face.
This is a newer cowboy hat and had a good-looking cowboy underneath, but I did not get permission to show his face. | Source

Some famous cowboy natives are Tom Mix, Gene Autry, & that ingenious Will Rogers of Cherokee decent. Crutcher’s Western Wear in Duncan still offers the real cowboy regalia to locals and tourists alike. Mark Crutcher’s extensive collection of old cowboy hats is on display, and he reiterates that they were worn for a working purpose, not for looks. His old hats show some of that purpose -- dirt, sweat, blood and cactus pricks. Don’t think he currently has any with bullet holes or arrowheads: Might be a hoof mark or two?

Oklahoma City downtown area, looking southeast.  A recently completed Devon Tower on the right took away lots of needed parking for downtown area, which is an ongoing unmet need.  At extreme left is church spire by OKC National Memorial.
Oklahoma City downtown area, looking southeast. A recently completed Devon Tower on the right took away lots of needed parking for downtown area, which is an ongoing unmet need. At extreme left is church spire by OKC National Memorial. | Source

A varied unity of peoples enjoy Oklahoma togetherness.

Many African-Americans had also traveled the Trail of Tears as Indian slaves. They evolved as cowboys, settlers and soldiers, and produced several of our country’s greatest jazz musicians. Descendants of these slaves, now known as Freedmen, live as a contributing populace amongst varied Indian, German, Spanish, Polish, English, Oriental peoples, making unity of these different heritages in daily business of this state.

One archaic community of Freedmen is Jerusalem, a few miles south of Oklahoma City, where ongoing activities include a Monarch Migration Festival written about in another article here. Freedmen were granted lands in perpetuity by their Indian owners. In 2011, dissension regarding the legality of this covenant became a heated issue between some tribes and Freedmen, regarding Freedmen privileges including their right to vote in Indian elections. Federal action recently rescinded temporarily, the judgment removing privileges from Freedmen, but the debate is sadly, ongoing.

Those rolling Oklahoma hills on a misty morning.

Highway 74 out from Jerusalem Butterfly Festival, 2012.  Yes, it was misty again.
Highway 74 out from Jerusalem Butterfly Festival, 2012. Yes, it was misty again. | Source

Think of Oklahoma...and Black Gold!

Black gold, i.e. oil, was discovered in this mostly flat prairie-land, and even today is a large portion of economic stability. Tall piped flames burn excess natural gas from oil areas across the land even yet, though are far fewer than when as a child I was amazed at their eerie nighttime glows across inky darkness.

This active oil well is in north central OKC and the 'Christmas tree' is ever-burning.
This active oil well is in north central OKC and the 'Christmas tree' is ever-burning. | Source
Oil wells on the north campus of Oklahoma Historical Museum.  The left brown one is an antique wooden one, no longer active.
Oil wells on the north campus of Oklahoma Historical Museum. The left brown one is an antique wooden one, no longer active. | Source

The busy Port of Catoosa in northeast Oklahoma is an industrial park which connects Tulsa to the Mississippi River Navigation System, reaching the Port of New Orleans. Incidentally, seagulls have flown this water route north from the Gulf and acclimated to Oklahoma weather, even staying during winters. Their number was notably decreased the past two years because of heat and drought, when many animal lives were distressed.

Weather, always the weather! Actually, never NOT the weather.

Oklahoma old-timers say of Oklahoma weather, “If you don’t like the weather, just wait ten minutes, it’ll change”. That is jokingly stated but so close to truth it isn’t an absurdity. Wintertime can be cold and icy – slipslidey all over icy -- and a week later it can be 80 degrees. Summer temperatures may soar beyond 114 which is a bit unusual, but can dive to the 60s in an hour with oncoming storms. The scary high tornado season, which runs from spring to late summer, brings repeated siren warnings of an oncoming tornado and foretells a scrambling of people to the safety of their ‘fraidy holes’; tornado shelters, usually underground. Our warning system and coverage of weather alerts is a prize-taker for its technology in tracking storms via the National Weather Service in Norman. Incidentally, there are tourists from faraway places, who travel here to hopefully spot a real tornado. They pay to be taken on risky guided trips toward potential storm areas and hope to film that dramatic scene for an experience of a lifetime! If you saw the ‘Twister’ movie, it is not very far removed from reality!

Andrew captured this small tornado in rural Oklahoma country last year.
Andrew captured this small tornado in rural Oklahoma country last year. | Source
This is a building wall cloud anvil on the back side of a thunderstorm that formed devastating tornadoes east of OKC last year.  Photo taken of campus of Oklahoma Christian University of Science and Arts in far north OKC.
This is a building wall cloud anvil on the back side of a thunderstorm that formed devastating tornadoes east of OKC last year. Photo taken of campus of Oklahoma Christian University of Science and Arts in far north OKC. | Source
Good weather will often bring the spraying of chemtrails.  These were very large ones looking up from my back yard.
Good weather will often bring the spraying of chemtrails. These were very large ones looking up from my back yard. | Source

Of course, wind is part of the weather.

Recent dynamic harvesting of Oklahoma winds is seen in a growing number of wind farms for electricity production. Canadian Valley Technology Center has training programs for wind technicians, and involves students from several other states attending. It seems to be a brisk business, as perceptive locals say western Oklahoma is windier than blustery Chicago…except in certain turbulent political times. ..

Hot or cold, wind blows in Oklahoma across wide grassy prairie land if it has rained, or across dustier plains if it has not. Waving wheat is a stirring reality of curling invisible winds, and old-timers’ remembrances of dust bowl gales are occasional talk. Its wintery force renders broken power lines laden with ice, or tree limbs weighted to breaking points with ice and fierce gusts of straight wind.

Sure enough though, on a clear day you can see almost forever!

View across water resource for OKC,  Lake Hefner, along the Northwest Highway area.
View across water resource for OKC, Lake Hefner, along the Northwest Highway area. | Source

Weather is unceasingly a conversation starter. We can gripe about the weather anytime and it brings an affable response.” It’s too hot or too cold: Too windy or too dry.” “It rained too much and cars are floating at Memorial and Penn! And down May Avenue--that always floods.” Storm season alerts make companions of neighbors or stranger-shoppers as all eyes look for a TV weather report in any mall. But, everyone anticipates the skittering rustic colors of autumn with its cool calm days of perfect temperature and breeze: Indian Summer. Oklahoma is a place of four definite seasonal changes, each with its own propensities.

Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter: Each in Turn.

Heart-shaped Redbud tree leaves are early springtime greeters. Its pink or pink-purple abundant flowers have already bloomed and faded from bare branches and trunks.
Heart-shaped Redbud tree leaves are early springtime greeters. Its pink or pink-purple abundant flowers have already bloomed and faded from bare branches and trunks. | Source
Summer, with wind, water, red dirt walks, makes for beautiful scenery - and exercise.
Summer, with wind, water, red dirt walks, makes for beautiful scenery - and exercise. | Source
These brilliant trees were showy festivals of autumn a couple years ago...before our two  years of drought faded their colors for this year.
These brilliant trees were showy festivals of autumn a couple years ago...before our two years of drought faded their colors for this year. | Source
This February record-setting snowstorm was one to never-be-forgotten!   The drift was almost three feet high and we had to dig out!  That is a lot for Oklahoma in the city!
This February record-setting snowstorm was one to never-be-forgotten! The drift was almost three feet high and we had to dig out! That is a lot for Oklahoma in the city! | Source

A State of Varied Sights and Scenery

There are four mountain ranges in Oklahoma, though they would not hold a candle to the height of New Mexico, Arizona or Colorado’s peaks. These ranges are Ouachita, Arbuckle, Wichita, Kiamichi, and their forests cover approximately twenty-four percent of Oklahoma’s geological map. From grassland plains to Tahlequah mountains, Broken Bow forest and lakes to western desert cacti, Oklahoma grandly displays it all.

Oklahoma has more water shoreline than the Atlantic and Gulf coast shores combined, because of its many man-made lakes and several rivers. This measurement includes the shorelines of large water reservoir-lakes as well as many larger farm ponds so necessary for cattlemen, farmers. Canton Lake in northwestern Oklahoma and Lake Texoma near Tulsa are great fishing and recreational areas, as is the largest Lake Murray, in south-central Oklahoma. The Great Salt Plains State Recreation park near Canton Lake is a fantastic family site for camping, hunting, fishing, and digging for selenite crystals, as pictured in another hub here.

This sign is near the Arcadia Round Barn on old Highway 66.
This sign is near the Arcadia Round Barn on old Highway 66. | Source

"Go West, young man, go West!"

Automobile travel in Oklahoma is regionally accessible by its three converging interstate highways: I-35, I-40 and I-44. Tourism Information Centers throughout the state offer free maps and informative brochures. Air travelers are best served by Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City and Tulsa International Airport, though OKC Wiley Post Airport offers ample private jet travel. The Lawton-Fort Sill Regional Airport, served by smaller airlines, is especially vital for military citizens who deploy via the Fort Sill military base. (Oklahoma Guardsmen have been activated in repeated deployment to the ongoing Gulf Wars, possibly more than any other state.) AMTRAK train service runs between OKC and Ft. Worth, Texas daily. More details can be found at www.travelok.com/visitor_information for additional attractions and services.

And travel west on the 'Mother Road'.

Highway 66, that famous “Mother Road’, was a first major western route for tourists and emigrates. Established in 1926 it ran from Chicago to Los Angeles and became known as ‘The Main Street of America’. Though it was displaced by the development of interstate highway systems, it remains an icon of memories for those who traveled – or wanted to travel – its route. It was officially removed from the U.S. Highway System in June 1985, but its historical folklore is greatly valued today.

Antique automobiles now, were once the thriving business on that 'Main Street of America'.

  Note the canvas water bag hanging on the front. Everyone had to have their own water supply, and this canvas kept it  'cool'.
Note the canvas water bag hanging on the front. Everyone had to have their own water supply, and this canvas kept it 'cool'. | Source

Just north of Oklahoma City from I-35 to the east, sits the famous Route 66 Round Barn in Arcadia. Refurbished several years ago, the enormous loft is available for meetings, receptions, dance parties; downstairs sports a great tourist museum and souvenir shop. A short mile west is “POPS” of Route 66 fame. It is a popular get-away drive for many folk who sip on its offering of 700 + flavors of pop while munching giant cow-burgers.

POPS, a proud observer of Route 66 fame, offers over 700 flavors of pop!  Its wide overhang has NO supporting props.
POPS, a proud observer of Route 66 fame, offers over 700 flavors of pop! Its wide overhang has NO supporting props. | Source
This famous Route 66 landmark  was nearly lost to history by aging demise  when its roof partially collapsed several years ago.  it was refurbished and opened as a tourist museum and souvenir shop, also offering  its huge loft for special parties.
This famous Route 66 landmark was nearly lost to history by aging demise when its roof partially collapsed several years ago. it was refurbished and opened as a tourist museum and souvenir shop, also offering its huge loft for special parties. | Source

A bit further south, now, to Oklahoma City

The Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum has informative sites at www.nps.gov/okci/faqs.htm and several other online sites. It is a beautiful place to visit with manicured floral areas and lawns, orchards, a well-kept Reflecting Pool, the Field of Chairs, and terraced seating below the enclosed base of the Survivor Tree. Park Rangers are on site seven days a week with brochures and assistance. Admission to the Memorial Park is free through both Time Gates, and has additional walk-in street accessibility without stairways. There is a charge to enter the multi-floored Museum which also has a store for keepsake purchases. Recently announced plans are to build a glassed-in overlook extension from the upper museum floor area.

An East Gate view with descriptive identifications of the Memorial area.
An East Gate view with descriptive identifications of the Memorial area. | Source

The Oklahoma Historical Museum is located across 23rd street north of the Capitol Building. There are extensive archives, historical projects and exhibits available to an interested public. Ms. Whitecotton, a charming young curator at the museum would be knowledgeable to guide you toward answers you wish. Septemberfest this year was a resounding success with free admission to varied exhibits, historical crafts vendors, walk-through museum areas, ’period costumes’, and the amazingly tiny ‘Winnie Mae’ which was flown around the world solo by Wiley Post. Twice

The Winnie Mae hangs displayed in the Rotunda of the Oklahoma Historical Museum.    The State Capitol building is seen out the window area.  Note the Osage Shield tiled on the floor.
The Winnie Mae hangs displayed in the Rotunda of the Oklahoma Historical Museum. The State Capitol building is seen out the window area. Note the Osage Shield tiled on the floor. | Source
Wiley Post flew this tiny plane around the world solo, an amazing feat!
Wiley Post flew this tiny plane around the world solo, an amazing feat! | Source
This is a south view of the Capitol Building.  The Guardian is seen atop as described.  An oil well is situated out from the south plaza of the building.
This is a south view of the Capitol Building. The Guardian is seen atop as described. An oil well is situated out from the south plaza of the building. | Source
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Two views of 'The Guardian'. One atop the Capitol Building and one with its sculptor as he prepares it for mounting on the State Capitol building dome.

Our State Capitol Building had not borne a dome until one was completed in November 2002. Atop the dome is a 21 foot statue of a Native American warrior sculpted by Chief of the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, Enoch Kelly Haney, the first full-blood Indian elected to the Oklahoma Senate. His bronze ‘The Guardian’ was his gift to the state of Oklahoma, designed representing peace and prosperity for all citizens, managed by an active defensive guardian status. The State Capitol Building sits on an active oil field and working pump jacks surround the compound. This is the only state capitol complex with producing oil wells on its locale.

More of This Red Dirt Distinctiveness. A Personal Take.

I am not native Oklahoman but have lived in the state for numerous years; have survived stressful wind and hailstorms, wintery ice storms, drought, heat, earthquakes, and imprudent Redneck jokes. Also nearly-ripe persimmons and bean pie, but not ‘oyster fries’. I accidentally ate one…once: Didn’t think it was tasty anyway,so ’hep yerself to em’! Cattlemen’s Café in Oklahoma City's historic Stockyard City advertises their delicious ‘lamb fries’ all the time. You can have mine, thanks! I don’t care if Presidents do eat there!

Cowboy Darrell advised us of lots of history while guiding us through Septemberfest at the Oklahoma Historical Museum.  He wears his hat always!
Cowboy Darrell advised us of lots of history while guiding us through Septemberfest at the Oklahoma Historical Museum. He wears his hat always! | Source

Informative opinion exists about this place called Oklahoma

Farmers, businessmen, cowboys and Indians, foreign laborers, students and teachers, military personnel, welfare recipients, are just the initial register of this local compilation of society. Boots are as standard fare as Nike tennis shoes–or cheapie flipflops. Cowboy hats are worn to high-society events in conjunction with tuxedos. Overalls are acceptable for ‘going to town’ as are short-shorts and tight jeans. (Yes, and some sloppy barely hanging onto the buttocks jeans.) And lots of tee shirts of course, perhaps sometimes under a denim vest.

Oklahoma is one of the ‘fattest in the nation’ and, it ‘sparkles on the Bible belt buckle’. It is listed in the top three states as being most unhealthy, so insurance fees are typically higher as are Medicare costs. But Okies are a friendly lot, and strangers don’t generally remain that way for long. Many cities are trying to go smoke-free, with even free assistance to help you ‘break the habit’. Some few stubborn old-timers might say they’d give up their cigs only for the scorching smell of cattle branding, one more time. It is also a publicized fact that McDonalds will often test their new food items in Oklahoma. We don’t care for any negativity…but we do like their fast food items!

One of the wingless aircraft ready on the ramp.
One of the wingless aircraft ready on the ramp. | Source

Farming, industry, inventiveness, all work in situ.

Oil, cattle, natural gas, cotton, peanuts, vineyards and wineries, medical research, military bases, varied technologies, IWA—the ingenious wingless aircraft corporation in OKC (superousa.com), movie production, and spittin’… all have their niche in humanoid Oklahoma. It is a collective society of some few suave snooties, of friendly farmer-folk and entrepreneurs, distinctive ingenious types, an unfortunate transient or two, and sociable common folk who all may hold the name ‘Okie’ in high regard.

“Ah, Mam, Sir, welcome to Oklahoma”, is drawled with a polite ‘tip of the cowboy hat’. Well, a few bravados will also bow to softly peck a hand of the little lady too. Her guy only gets a hard-pumping handshake, though with a country smile!

Shore ‘nuff, stranger, “Welcome to Oklahoma!”.

More images of these red grains.

Lake Hefner, a large man-made water source for Oklahoma City and surrounding area.  Note how the water level is about six feet below normal by the red silt layer showing on the rock dam.
Lake Hefner, a large man-made water source for Oklahoma City and surrounding area. Note how the water level is about six feet below normal by the red silt layer showing on the rock dam. | Source
This red dirt/water stream will fill and roar when it rains enough.  When...if...and it will, eventually.
This red dirt/water stream will fill and roar when it rains enough. When...if...and it will, eventually. | Source
Hafer Park fishing pond and trails is a popular summer time picnic and exercise area.
Hafer Park fishing pond and trails is a popular summer time picnic and exercise area. | Source
I found this creamy sandy dirt embedded in an eroded drainage ditch from a pond I often explore.  Red dirt again, yeah!
I found this creamy sandy dirt embedded in an eroded drainage ditch from a pond I often explore. Red dirt again, yeah! | Source
Stormy skies deluxe!  And it didn't even rain that time - at least where I was.
Stormy skies deluxe! And it didn't even rain that time - at least where I was. | Source
Ah, Spring!  The Redbuds, our state tree, bloom even before the tornado season starts.
Ah, Spring! The Redbuds, our state tree, bloom even before the tornado season starts. | Source
This is the Arcadia Round Barn from the east side.  The tall sign was built on a tiny plot of ground against the wishes of the townspeople by a person who demanded many thousand unaffordable dollars to NOT build it.
This is the Arcadia Round Barn from the east side. The tall sign was built on a tiny plot of ground against the wishes of the townspeople by a person who demanded many thousand unaffordable dollars to NOT build it. | Source
A rail fence, reminiscent of old-time fencing, but an attractive view toward blue skies.
A rail fence, reminiscent of old-time fencing, but an attractive view toward blue skies. | Source
Sunset, red like Port Silt Loam.  And weeds, of which some are ever presenting their pollen.  But put the two together and they portray an Oklahoma beautiful evening.
Sunset, red like Port Silt Loam. And weeds, of which some are ever presenting their pollen. But put the two together and they portray an Oklahoma beautiful evening. | Source
A typical scene across the fields of Oklahoma.
A typical scene across the fields of Oklahoma. | Source
The Survivor Tree lived beyond the bomb blast  of the Murrah Building in Oklahoma City.  It is a realistic portrayal of   adjustment to negative  circumstance and healing through careful nurturing.  People can accomplish this  also.
The Survivor Tree lived beyond the bomb blast of the Murrah Building in Oklahoma City. It is a realistic portrayal of adjustment to negative circumstance and healing through careful nurturing. People can accomplish this also. | Source

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Comments 23 comments

aviannovice profile image

aviannovice 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

This is a lot of great information that I knew nothing about. I do know about red dirt, though. I had jeans stained for close to a year!


teaches12345 profile image

teaches12345 3 years ago

I was in Oklahoma once and I remember seeing the red clay and all the cowboy hats worn by people. Thanks for the lovely share on the state. Your photos are awesome, especially loved the thunderstorm picture.


Rosemay50 profile image

Rosemay50 3 years ago from Hawkes Bay - NewZealand

Wow so much information here I feel as though I have been to visit. The musium sounds fascinating. Your photo are just fabulous especially the autumn trees, what awesome colours.

Thank you for taking us on this tour.

Thumbs UP


Vellur profile image

Vellur 3 years ago from Dubai

Awesome hub, I enjoyed reading this hub. You have presented excellent photos of Oklahoma. Interesting facts and history. You have showcased Oklahoma in all it's wonder and glory. Awesome once again, voted up and pinned. Loved all the photos.


shiningirisheyes profile image

shiningirisheyes 3 years ago from Upstate, New York

I have to say, you have performed well with this hub. I have learned some interesting facts about Oklahoma. Very well-researched and informative.

Thanks for including a mention about the Trail of Tears.


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 3 years ago from Central United States of America Author

aviannovice and teaches 12345, thank you for your visit ...and remembrances of that red dirt - and those cowboy hats! I finally learned that bleach and alcohol would take out stain from white toddler socks and shirts. Umm-mm, Maybe it was vinegar and alcohol...that was a long time ago! Anyway, enjoyed your comments!


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 3 years ago from Central United States of America Author

Rosemay50, thank you for enjoying the visit. Autumn this year is quite drab, colorwise.

Vellur, thank you for enjoying Oklahoma from so far away! Come to visit. Amazing, but I found your pin before I came to Hubpages this time. Thank you for the pin!

Shiningirisheyes, thank you for your nice comment. You too, have visited Oklahoma from 'way up north'. Thank you! And yes, that Trail of Tears is a sad history...


christopheranton profile image

christopheranton 3 years ago from Gillingham Kent. United Kingdom

Great article and pictures. You really make Oklahoma come alive. It must be a wonderful place.


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 3 years ago from Central United States of America Author

christopheranton, good to see you 'in Oklahoma' again...I think just about every place on earth has its own interesting story...including your Gillingham Kent. Thanks for visiting me here - I'm coming to see you now!


billybuc profile image

billybuc 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

Wow! Great look at Oklahoma, and the pictures are fantastic. You did a wonderful job with this hub; it is as comprehensive a look at a state as I have seen on this site. Well done!


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 3 years ago from Central United States of America Author

billybuc, thank you for visiting Oklahoma from your beautiful Olympia. I lived in Vancouver, WA as a young child...and still remember rain, rain. Glad you enjoyed the pictures and thank you for kind words.


Deborah Brooks profile image

Deborah Brooks 3 years ago from Brownsville,TX

wow what a great state Oklahoma is so much history there.. and great vacation spots to see. this is a great hub great information

Debbie


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 3 years ago from Central United States of America Author

Deborah Brooks, I visited Brownsville many years ago and had a great time. Brought back some seeds of a wild flowering vine that bore tiny white flowers and smells like honeysuckly only better. Glad for your visit and comment here too.


Patty Inglish, MS profile image

Patty Inglish, MS 3 years ago from North America

This is quite a Hub and a terrific collection of interesting photos. I am impressed by the Guardian statue crafted by a Senator, the colorful fall colors, and the history of the state. Very well done and marked Up and many more.


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 3 years ago from Central United States of America Author

Patty Inglish, MS, thanks so much for a read here and a gracious comment. Glad you enjoyed my Red Dirt! :-)


Bettyoverstreet10 profile image

Bettyoverstreet10 3 years ago from Vacaville, Ca.

when I saw your "groggyfish" name, just had to click-cute! Sounds like you might be from Oklahoma- I live in Calif but was born in Oklahoma. We were through there in Sept while on a Music tour. Sang at two Senior homes in Barlesville, then on to Tenn, Missouri and Colorado singing at Churches. Have a great weekend!


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 3 years ago from Central United States of America Author

Bettyoverstreet10, are you kin to Delia here in OK? Sounds like you had a great musical tour across our nation's midsection. Thanks for your singing ministry activities, and keep them up!


sgbrown profile image

sgbrown 3 years ago from Southern Oklahoma

You did an excellent job describing and providing some history about our wonderful state! I love your pictures! I even learned a few things I didn't know. This is an excellent hub and I really enjoyed reading it! Voting this up, interesting and sharing! Have a wonderful day! :)


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 3 years ago from Central United States of America Author

sgbrown, glad you enjoyed the history and pic of this familiar territory. It was great fun to research and I did learn several new things myself.

Thanks for your visit, and for sharing too. Blessings your way!


RTalloni profile image

RTalloni 3 years ago from the short journey

Your piece on Oklahoma is a great read--interesting, informative, and the photos with captions are tops. It takes all kinds is all one can say when reading about the Arcadia Round Barn sign--folks is folks everywhere! So glad you included the Survivor Tree. Thanks for sharing amazing Oklahoma with us!


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 3 years ago from Central United States of America Author

RTalloni, thank you for y our comment on the Arcadia Round Barn sign...I almost didn't put that in, but it was a fairly major local action. And I do enjoy going down occasionally to visit the Survivor Tree. I have a picture- somewhere - of my two year granddaughter standing by the (looked like it wouldn't live)tree not long after the explosion...vastly different appearance then!


ladyguitarpicker profile image

ladyguitarpicker 22 months ago from 3460NW 50 St Bell, Fl32619

Hi, I can't wait to visit Oklahoma it looks very interesting like your Hub. I enjoyed reading this and your very nice photos. I see you get spring, in Fl. we skip spring and go right in to hot summer. I wont complain I hate snow. I was really surprised to see that snow photo.


frogyfish profile image

frogyfish 21 months ago from Central United States of America Author

ladyguitarpicker, thank you for enjoying your visit. That particular snowstorm was a record 'doozy' and nobody liked it! At least it was a 500 year type, as is said. Thank you for commenting and come on in! :-)

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