Adelaide Tourist Attractions II

National Railway Museum

Opening Times:

Mon - Fri: 10am to 5pm:

Sat: 10am to 5pm:

Sun: 10am to 5pm

Address:

Lipson St Adelaide 5015

Australia

Phone: 08 8341 1690

URL: http://www.natrailmuseum.org.au/

Type of Attraction: Museum

The National Railway Museum at Port Adelaide, stages one of the worlds best railway artefacts. The Museum showcases around a hundred railway structures from various states, the Commonwealth and also railway exhibits of private operators.

The Railway Museum was established by a concerned community of railway conservationists. The site earlier contained the Mile End Roundhouse. Initially a modest collection of outdated steam locomotives were displayed .However, now it’s Australia’s largest Railway Museum.

The Railway Museum operates from two locations, Lipson Street Port Adelaide and Semaphore. You’ll find among the exhibits, the three main railway-gauges used in Australia, a workshop on safe operating practices, a forum on women and their role in railways and the historic 'Tea and Sugar' train which used to serve the railway families in the past. Visitors also adore the Coastal Train Ride on the Semaphore and Fort Glanville Tourist Railway.

There are a few splendid stations and sheds on display, namely the Port Dock Station Goods Shed, held up by timber beams, a testament to the railway buildings of 19th century South Australia. Also the Woodville Signal Cabin, now open for tours. Additionally, there’s the Callington Station, an archetypal building which was used by the South Australian Railways for small towns.

Other interesting activities in Adelaide’s National Railway Museum include looking around the Woodville signal cabin, viewing the model railway and visiting the Break of Gauge Shop , which sells a range of items such as Thomas the Tank Engine toys, CD’s and books.

South Australian Police Museum


Opening Times:

Sat, Sun & Public Holidays- 1 pm to 5pm.

Address:

Kintore Avenue, Adelaide

Phone: (08) 8274 8597

URL: N/A

Type of Attraction: Museum

South Australia’s Police Museum, situated towards the west of Adelaide’s main street, showcases the unfailing sincerity of the early police force of Australia. Ornamenting the beautiful hills, the museum takes you on a journey through time detailing the inception and the development of the Australian police force. The museum stores an archive of over 600,000 documents and artefacts, besides photographs of the heroic police personnel and their activities

Established in 1850 as Clare Valley’s police outpost, it eventually came under the administration of the National Trust of South Australia. The origin of the museum can be traced to the spiralling crime rates in the region, prompting the Governor to form a proper police force to contain crime. The Police Museum is now housed in the renovated mounted police barracks of the 1850’s. You’ll also find an array of Victorian furniture and clothing, archives of the Clare area, vintage photos of Clare, as well as old agricultural machinery and dainty horse-drawn carts.

The Museum is open by booking for groups in excess of 15. You can also visit the adjacent Armoury Building built in 1856, displaying some fine police and military equipments.

Migration Museum

Opening Times:

Mon - Fri: 10am to 5pm

Sat: 10am to 5pm

Sun: 10am to 5pm

Address:

82 Kintore Ave

Adelaide 5000

Australia

Phone: 08 8207 7570

URL: http://www.history.sa.gov.au/migra/migra.htm

Type of Attraction: Museum

The Migration Museum of Adelaide, where you can travel through time and witness the life and times of the immigrants settled in South Australia. It’s one of a kind museum, a bold endeavour which showcases the social events in Australia, from the 19th century onwards.

The museum, managed by the History Trust of South Australia, is located in the heart of Adelaide city. Formerly, this place used to be the Destitute Asylum, to support the homeless of South Australia. Among the galleries, you’ll find more than a hundred texts taking you through events such as the boat trips from Europe to Australia and the condemnable White Australian Policy. Besides this, exhibitions centred on particular nations and their migration experiences are occasionally showcased.

Of particular interest is the gallery detailing migration of the 20th Century. Special attention is given to the lives of refugees from the first and second World Wars. You might also get your name engraved on a brick outside in the courtyard, which definitely, comes at a price. Educational programs for schools and guided tours for visitors are available, although prior booking is essential. Migration-themed souvenirs are also put up for sale, making your trip all the more memorable.

Glenelg Art Gallery

Opening Times:

2.00-4.00pm on weekdays

Address:

15 Moseley Street, Glenelg

Adelaide 5045,

South Australia

Phone: 08 8295 2684

URL: http://www.totaltravel.com.au/link.asp?fid=641816

Type of Attraction: Museum

Placed beside the Holdfast Bay in Gulf Saint Vincent, the petite Glenelg Fine Art Gallery displays some of the most unique and elegant art collections in all of South Australia. Glenelg, a famous beach-side getaway in the suburbs of Adelaide, is a renowned destination for travellers.

The Glenelg Fine Art Gallery ,which once used to be the Glenelg Fire station, has been displaying a variety of elegant artistic works, not to mention the stunning flower pieces on display at the gallery. The stylish building of the Art Gallery, now more than thirty years in operation, has been listed as a local heritage. A variety of works are showcased to the visitors, ranging from traditional landscapes of famous Australian artists to lively seaside and local sceneries in bright colours.

You’ll also get a choice of various artistic genres such as the traditional, impressionist, surrealism, abstract art and of course, the contemporary. Of particular interest is the authentic high ceiling rooms, now transformed to the spacious exhibition space.

The Glenelg Gallery also provides an interest free lay-by service. A free hanging service is offered to the buyer as well. With numerous hotels and a host of eateries around the Glenelg Fine Art Gallery, visiting Glenelg Gallery is a comfortable experience for the tourists and art lovers alike.

Ayers Historic House Museum

Opening Times:

Tuesday - Friday: 10am to 4pm

Weekends and Public Holidays: 1pm to 4pm

Address:

Ayers Historic House Museum

288 North Terrace

Adelaide, SA 5000,

Australia

Phone: 8223 1234

URL: http://www.ayershousemuseum.org.au/

Type of Attraction: Museum

In the booming East End district of Adelaide city is the Ayers Historic House Museum. A historic building constructed in the Victorian style, Ayers House boasts of a stunning bluestone facade and awesome wooden furniture inside the mansion.

Named after the owner of the house, Henry Ayers, the mansion was built in 1846. As Henry Ayers was the prime minister of South Australia, the house was transformed it into a luxurious 40-room mansion, having a spacious dining room and a ballroom, among others. The house was also one of Adelaide’s first which had gas lighting.

During all these years, the mansion was used in a number of activities like Cabinet meetings, parliamentary dinners, a place for injured soldiers and an open-air café. Currently, The National Trust of South Australia is headquartered in the Ayers House. You’ll also find two fine restaurants within the premises, one of them serving delectable kebabs. It’s one of the best places to view Regency architecture, as well.

Among the displays showcased, visitors admire the decorative arts, furniture, costumes and silverware. It’s also impossible to miss the gorgeous ceilings in every room of the mansion, which incidentally is hand-painted. Numerous family memorabilia is showcased too. You also should not miss the magnificent 300 kilogram chandelier, which is among the displays in the Ayers Historic House Museum

Comments

No comments yet.

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Click to Rate This Article
    working