Airplane Crashes -- Flight 232/As Though We Were There

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First class Seat "5F" assigned to Joseph De Cross
First class Seat "5F" assigned to Joseph De Cross | Source

Being lucky enough to have been on airplanes for the last 25 years or so, made us look into this flight 232. A four days study and research took us to that date.

Here is the introduction: Flight 232 from United Airlines took off from Colorado on July 19, 1989 at 2:13 p.m. (14:13 p.m). Final destination was Philly, making a stop at O'hare International in Chicago. At about 3:15 p.m. flying above 36,500 feet, the structural strentgh was put to the test. A big jolt was felt a minute later. For the next 44 minutes passengers felt the worse experience of their lives. just picture the great adventure ride at Six flags. Engine two that is mounted on the back wing lost total functionality. Gathering enough information we wanted to experience the moment. There were 12% seats empty, so we decided to take a flight with them: Our assigned seat? First class: 5F

Perfect animation of the flight!

In the Beginning...

Stapleton International Airport

Denver Colorado,

1:16 p.m. (13:16:00)

Was visiting a relative from the Airforce Base, and made it just in time to take my flight back home to Sioux City. To my surprise, it was a boring Wednesday of that July 19, 1989. The airfare was not important, because my company chose first class even before I could make a choice of my own.

The weird thing was that...was that... I felt as though I was in the wrong place. Don't you just have sometimes that hunch? Just waited behind a long line and the Check-in. It was done with no further problems at all. We were 285 plus one soul entering that plane. Parents making sure kids were paying attention and some were young lives heading to Chicago. I didn't have time to do much on that gate, because people were already boarding by 1:50 p.m. We saw the main cabin from the gate. A grey haired Captain was moving his head up and down, I guess checking engines and flight controls.

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Taking off..!

2:09 PM

The take off was not delayed at all. Was easier than anything. A piece of cake for modern aeronautical engineering. This pilot made our flight as comfortable as possible. Here is Captain Alfred C. Haines's first words:

"Good evening ladies and gentlemen. This is your Captain. We are heading North east according to Tower Control here at O'Hare -- temperatures will be in the middle 80's, bluest sky as you can see. On behalf of the crew and ourselves, we want to thank you for flying United."

Next, we hear a flight attendant : "Please remained seated until the plane has reached cruising altitude and the 'fasten your seat belt light goes off completely." A pre-recorded voice follows: Federal regulations prohibit the use of electronic devices while taking off..."


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Engine two and 3 hydraulic systems get compromised
Engine two and 3 hydraulic systems get compromised | Source

All seemed to be fine... until...

3:16 p.m.

We were already getting our special hot plate of the day by a gorgeous senior flight attendant. Shrimp linguine... When we felt a jolt.

Have you ever been parked on your car garage and all of a sudden you feel two heavy-set youngsters jump and fall on your rear end bumper? Just add a cheap noise from fire crackers from a 4th of July weekend... We knew something was going on. The captain had turned off the seat belts lights at 2:35 p.m. "Flight attendants please remained seated.." Second Officer Dudley Dvorak, flight engineer, realized that the plane lost complete hydraulic pressure within the next four minutes. "You gotta be kidding me!" responded Captain Haines.

What happened?.. and we didn't know?

After reaching those cruising 37,000 miles the plane proceeded to make a shallow right turn as required. An unexpected jolt shook the plane. Engine number 2 disintegrated from the inside out literally, causing part of it to separate.The remaining disk was immediately thrown out of balance and was ejected toward the right horizontal stabilizer, scattering titanium shrapnel as it came apart.

Several pieces impacted the fuselage. The aircraft's three hydraulic systems were compromised, one in the left/right stabilizers and another which connected just below where the fan disk failed.

Practically we were mortally wounded, and for the next 44 minutes we would hold to ourselves in prayers. Even before September 11th, 2011 people started to write "I love you" on books, or loose pages from agendas and notebooks. This time it was not the exception! We did it in Pompeii, and in those Altamira caves!
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The United DC10 Cabin
The United DC10 Cabin | Source
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The Human Side

I walked on purpose to the back lavatory and walked past these palpable lives. I felt a deep pain when I saw these parents with little kids on their laps. Some were sleeping, and others were finishing their meal. Suddenly a young woman caught my eye. It was Heather O`Mara, a lawyer from New Jersey. She smiled back. I asked the Lord, why did they have to depart? Who was bound to survive? I saw this guy from seat 20-H moving to another seat. I felt Mister death taking names and... I wanted to kick his a##! but he told me me softly like the joker, "the list is legal Joseph! YOU want to add your name?"

I just said, "forget ya!" The plane was already fighting against time and uncertainty. I recognized people that survived and painfully saw the ones that never made it.

All of a sudden I felt swallowed up into that Field of Dreams in Dyersville, Iowa. After a little while we were back on that plane. This gigantic shark was wounded and wanted to get back at us with a vengeance.


We Need all the Help...!!

Dennis E. Fitch, an off-duty United Airlines DC-10 flight instructor, was seated in the first class section. We saw him talking to a flight attendant and offered his help. He eventually was invited to join the crew. Update: Mr. Fitch died on May 14, 2012.

The situation at 3:22 p.m.

"This is... I've never seen this before. All three Hydraulic Systems are gone," said Fitch. "Now the plane is making us go to the right all the time," responds First Officer William Records. "Chicago, this is an emergency...repeat, mayday Chicago, we need the closest airport... over... we are losing altitude at 1400 feet /minute -- Tower control Roger?"

We felt as though this trip was for real...

I fastened my seat-belt and I felt the fuselage around and above me. Clearly the overhead luggage wanted to give up on us. The plane was being crushed by invisible forces. I just wanted to vomit! Sudden and intermittent sinking sensations made it worse. I grabbed that paper bag and puked...!

Why Sioux City?

Imagine being yourself inside a car going down the hill with no brakes. Just telling your copilot to open his door to compensate for proper direction course. From the time the United 232 got crippled after 3:16 p.m. there was no other choice. "The plane was going down no matter what!"

The crew managed to control altitude by utilizing each engine left independently so they could control steering adjustments. What we felt was the dive of our lives. In those times the cabin could be left opened and we could hear them talk technicalities.

"Fitch, try to work the throttles instead," suggested Captain Haynes. With one throttle in each hand, Fitch was able to mitigate the phugoid cycle. It was back to Wilbur and Orville Wright times, literally!!

Human strength took over... lack of pressure. But there were no rudders anymore...!

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Sioux City...We've got a problem!

3:45 p.m.

"Dear Passengers, I'm going to be honest with you: We are doing our darnedest to land this mammoth, but we expect one of the worse experiences...The only way to bring down this thing is keep going in circles . We want you to start praying..."

How could he say all that? I wanted to get out of this nightmare. But braced myself for impact like any of the passengers. Mothers were holding their babies and some wanted to mumble some words of impotence. I was sweating cold. The smell of burn plastic and oil invaded the passengers area.

Final conversation between Tower control ATC and crew:

Fitch: I'll tell you what, we'll have a beer when this is all done!

"Haynes: Well I don't drink, but I'll sure as hell have one!"


A few minutes later:

Sioux City Approach: United Two Thirty-Two Heavy, the wind's currently three six zero at one one; three sixty at eleven. You're cleared to land on any runway.

Captain Haynes: Roger!! (laughing) You want to be particular and make it a runway, huh?


The Worst Tragedy Started...

3:59:01p.m.

We were descending too fast and too quick. Instead of landing at 150 miles per hour, we were lining up on runway 22, at 280-300 miles per hour. That was way too much. At the last second a mom instinctively, put her baby on the floor... "I just held my head against this front seat. This was it!!"

4:00:16 p.m.

Of the 296 people aboard, 111 were killed in the crash, while 185 survived. Captain Haynes later told of three contributing factors regarding the time of day that allowed for a better chance of survival:

  1. The accident occurred during daylight hours
  2. The accident occurred when the Iowa Air National Guard was on duty at Sioux Gateway Airport.
  3. It was a moment when shift turn ocurred at Sioux City Hospitals. All stayed put!

Witnessing it all...

The DC-10 impacted on the right wing. An unexpected phugoid cycle pulled the right wing down. A ball of fired started right behind me. I felt as though I was on that roller coaster of a lifetime. So... I knew I was going to die. That was it!

I smelled the blood coming out of my nose. Corn fields brushed off my windows and I ended up upside down in a split of a second. I couldn't breath... I couldn't. At the last second I started to breath. My ribs were crushed and I saw a light behind me. A piece of sharp metal wanted to dart into my left eye... but didn't! My head was bleeding profusely...

I was lucky enough! My structural framing side separated from the middle section and... I saw an horrifying view behind me: Toxic fumes involving miserably human beings. I just cried. I managed to get myself off, and ran for safety behind the fields. I wasn't chosen to die. But I just cried for that humanity! When I turned around I saw this scene of hope: Thank you Lord!

Spencer Bayley, 3 1/2 yrs old.
Spencer Bayley, 3 1/2 yrs old. | Source

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Comments 16 comments

Janine Huldie profile image

Janine Huldie 4 years ago from New York, New York

Wow, Joseph I truly felt like you were there during this crash and got a clear picture from what you wrote here. I, myself, have never had to experience anything like this when flying. My parents went to Mexico when I was a little girl and 2 of the engines actually died on the plane. They were finally able to get one of the engines working to land the plane safely, but it was enough to scare my mom out of flying for years after that. Have voted up and shared of course.


billybuc profile image

billybuc 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

I can't imagine the sheer terror of such a thing, but you came pretty darn close to capturing it. Joseph, you are a very gifted writer. This was just beautiful...and terrifying....and a show of compassion!


tammyswallow profile image

tammyswallow 4 years ago from North Carolina

What a terrifying ordeal. I would hope to pass out from fear before hitting the ground. Action packed and memorable!


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 4 years ago from South Africa

Horrible airplane crash! Though event very well presented, lord de cross :)


josh3418 profile image

josh3418 4 years ago from Pennsylvania

Joseph,

Wow, you did an excellent job portraying the fear, pain and terror of being involved in a plane crash. What a horrific experience that would be! I can not even begin to imagine! Thanks for your awesome ability to write and capture these experiences Joesph!


Deborah Brooks profile image

Deborah Brooks 4 years ago from Brownsville,TX

Jospeh wow.. How horrible and what a great hub at the same time.. You write with grace and you are so extraordinary life.. wow.. You are simply amazing

Debbie


Faith Reaper profile image

Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

Well, lord, it seems that one day of rest broke your writer's block, as this is really interesting how you set this up. I know if I were in a plane going down, I would die before it actually crashed!!! I would just be calling out Jesus, Jesus, Jesus help us!!! And then right at the moment of the crash, behold, I get to see the face of Jesus! Absent the body, present with Jesus. Excellent job here, and it did seem as if you were right there, terrifying! God bless. In His Love, Faith Reaper


always exploring profile image

always exploring 4 years ago from Southern Illinois

OMG, I felt like i was a passenger on flight 232 and i was horrified..It amazes me how you can put yourself in a scene and we are right there with you..GREAT write..Amazing talent...


CarlySullens profile image

CarlySullens 4 years ago from St. Louis, Missouri

Joseph, you have a gift of opening a door and bringing the reader into any room or story you write. It is like being in Joseph's virtual world. Your writing is amazing, your storytelling is amazing. Honestly, I had to skim this one, because you are so good, and I am terrified to fly. I picked up pieces here and there and wanted more like flipping through the channels and finding a horror film. I turn away, but something always calls me to turn back.

I am always turning back, Joseph to read your work.


Lord De Cross profile image

Lord De Cross 4 years ago Author

Hi Janine. We did research for 3 days and a half. The final story took us by storm. We did cry when this little kid spirit took us to the Field of Dreams. Thanks for leaving such a HEARTFELT comment!

@Hi billy, Yeah we try to get better... and we love to test new horizons that can move us all. Thanks for your feedback and support! You always prasing our work. We feel confident in our writing, and we appreciate so much your input!

@Tammy, that mom putting her daughter crying under her own danger , show us how far a mom can go in order to save her kids' lives. Action and more action can bring us back commenting and interesting reactions. Thanks for checking on us! You always so supportive!

@Martie dear, hope we didn't scare you. This ordeal was real, because we felt lots of turbulence when we fly, and we know the deal. Will check on your hubs real soon!

@Aw! Josh! Your comments really touch our heart. A young man praising his friend's work. Writing in HP has more than just monetary reward. This community is so awesome. Thanks for being here with us!

@Debbie is just inspiration and lots of reading. Connecting the final storyline takes its time, and I think is worth the wait. Thanks for being such a loving friend!

@Hi Faith, Well yeah! We connected the lose ends with our own creative mind. scenes came to us and we did the final cut. Your example sounds down to earth. I think everyone prays at the horrifying moment, that seems an eternity. Gob bless you Faith!

@Rubi, to be honest we don't even know how a story is going to end. Everything flows naturally like a mind with zero gravity. We love to dramatize. We did cry a couple of times... seeing the list of lost souls. Sometimes we wonder, why some have to die, and some are spared. Thanks!

@Hi Carly Sullen, you did leave a beautiful comment for us to read. If you love to write and cannot stop, then you have something to work with from the very start. You are just too kind at times. We just do what we like to do. Much appreciated!

Lord


Gypsy Rose Lee profile image

Gypsy Rose Lee 4 years ago from Riga, Latvia

WOW Boy I was sure bracing myself for the impact. This was like 3D writing. I'm scared of flying as is but have flown quite a few times. You really know how to put someone right into the action.


Lord De Cross profile image

Lord De Cross 4 years ago Author

Hi Rasma, 3D writing? Lol! That was so kind of you. Thanks for the typo corrections and your wonderful comment. We came so close as you said. Been on air quite a few times, and the picture is not so fun, when turbulence goes above 25-35 mins non stop. Thanks again from Riga!


tillsontitan profile image

tillsontitan 4 years ago from New York

It is amazing to realize you were NOT on that plane! What a fantastic piece of writing this is. I am just flabbergasted at how real the whole thing felt! Your impeccable research led to a truly moving and riveting story.

Voted all the way across (I left funny in just to give you a grand slam) and sharing.


Lord De Cross profile image

Lord De Cross 4 years ago Author

Thanks Mary! Glad you liked it. did a thorough research, and eneded up crying at the field of dreams...actually we loved the trip! You have a wonderful day, and thanks for your input.


B. Leekley profile image

B. Leekley 4 years ago from Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA

What caused engine #2 to disintegrate? Was human error in its production or maintenance a factor? Were any of the deaths caused by toxic fumes caused by the choices of materials, such as for seating? What was learned from the accident to make commercial flying afterward safer?


Lord De Cross profile image

Lord De Cross 4 years ago Author

Bleekley, NTSB attributed the cause of the accident to a failure of United Airlines maintenance processes and personnel, failing to detect an existing fatigue crack. So it could've happened to any turbine around those years. Today maintenance is rigorous and with better results. We are not experts on fabrics but, industry patterns did change afterwards.

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