Travel The Arkansas Heritage Trails

Arkansas Heritage Trail(s) - Signs to look for while on your trip

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Arkansas Parks & Tourism Heritage Trail sign - Trail of Tears, East Main, Russellville, ARArkansas Parks & Tourism Heritage Trail sign - Trail of Tears, East Main, Russellville, ARArkansas Parks & Tourism Heritage Trail sign - Civil War Trail, Hwy 7S near ATU, Russellville, ARArkansas Parks & Tourism Heritage Trail sign - Civil War Trail, Hwy 7S & Main Street, Russellville, ARArkansas Parks & Tourism Heritage Trail sign - Civil War Trail, Hwy 7S & Main Street, Russellville, AR
Arkansas Parks & Tourism Heritage Trail sign - Trail of Tears, East Main, Russellville, AR
Arkansas Parks & Tourism Heritage Trail sign - Trail of Tears, East Main, Russellville, AR | Source
Arkansas Parks & Tourism Heritage Trail sign - Trail of Tears, East Main, Russellville, AR
Arkansas Parks & Tourism Heritage Trail sign - Trail of Tears, East Main, Russellville, AR | Source
Arkansas Parks & Tourism Heritage Trail sign - Civil War Trail, Hwy 7S near ATU, Russellville, AR
Arkansas Parks & Tourism Heritage Trail sign - Civil War Trail, Hwy 7S near ATU, Russellville, AR | Source
Arkansas Parks & Tourism Heritage Trail sign - Civil War Trail, Hwy 7S & Main Street, Russellville, AR
Arkansas Parks & Tourism Heritage Trail sign - Civil War Trail, Hwy 7S & Main Street, Russellville, AR | Source
Arkansas Parks & Tourism Heritage Trail sign - Civil War Trail, Hwy 7S & Main Street, Russellville, AR
Arkansas Parks & Tourism Heritage Trail sign - Civil War Trail, Hwy 7S & Main Street, Russellville, AR | Source

Heritage Trail - The Trail of Tears in Arkansas

The State of Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism, has sponsored The Arkansas Heritage Trail.

As of 2011, signage marking The Heritage Trails; The Butterfield Trail, Civil War Trails, The Southwest Trail, and The Trail of Tears have been placed along Arkansas roadways. Signs show the different trails as they occurred historically and geographically throughout the State of Arkansas.

In Central, Arkansas, I have seen the Trail of Tears signs, such as in Little Rock, along Stagecoach Road, University Avenue, down Markham, over the Broadway Bridge, into Hwy 365, traveling into North Little Rock, through Maumelle, Mayflower, and Conway, AR.

I see the Heritage signs on Scenic Hwy 7 South, and North, down Hwy 64, ending at Point Remove at Morrilton, AR where there is a museum at the railway station where the Cherokee and four other civilized tribes were removed from their own property.

It is one thing reading about the plight of our original hosts, the Native Tribal Peoples of North America, it is another to see the evidence and enormity of such an undertaking.

There were thousands of human beings, woman, children and men. There were so many who were made to walk over 1,000 miles. In freezing weather they trudged through a wilder Arkansas, in the winter it had to be a nightmare that none of us can imagine.




The Trail of Tears Is a Sad Reminder

The Southern way of the past, was of keeping dirty secrets.

Christian people have been known to look the other way when other humans were being mistreated. They should have stood up and spoke out, but they did not want to make waves, or stick out like sore thumbs.

It was a way of life, back in the 1800s to demand silence about the violation of innocents. This silence was kept within families, communities and on.

Secrets have a way of getting out.

The truth about what was visited on Native American human beings in North America in the early 1800s is as bad as the Holocaust suffered by the Jews. Indians stood in the way of gold, and land grabs, and the theft which occurred is rising to the surface and cannot be ignored.

Justice cries out.

The Native Tribal People. deserve to be treated like humans who have had their very existence threatened and almost destroyed.

Thanks to the Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism for the hard work, and effort in posting signs on the Heritage Trails.



Along the Trail of Tears, East of Russellville, AR

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A long, and sorrowful walkheading East from Russellville, toward Point Remove, Morrilton, AR Some of these photos are just road. The Trail of Tears happened in a time when Arkansas was more of a wilderness. This long walk was on dirt.Along the Heritage Trails, there are many cross-roads. Routes 363 N, and 247 S are accessible from Hwy 64Hwy 64, used to be a highly traveled road. I-40 takes the largest traffic, and so it is a welcome, and slower pace to travel 64Arkansas Heritage Trail - Trail of Tears, and the Butterfield Trail.Reflection of how long this leg of the walk was. Toward Pottsville, AR on Hwy 646 miles to Atkins, 19 miles to Morrilton, AR and Point Remove
A long, and sorrowful walk
A long, and sorrowful walk | Source
heading East from Russellville, toward Point Remove, Morrilton, AR
heading East from Russellville, toward Point Remove, Morrilton, AR | Source
Some of these photos are just road. The Trail of Tears happened in a time when Arkansas was more of a wilderness. This long walk was on dirt.
Some of these photos are just road. The Trail of Tears happened in a time when Arkansas was more of a wilderness. This long walk was on dirt. | Source
Along the Heritage Trails, there are many cross-roads. Routes 363 N, and 247 S are accessible from Hwy 64
Along the Heritage Trails, there are many cross-roads. Routes 363 N, and 247 S are accessible from Hwy 64 | Source
Hwy 64, used to be a highly traveled road. I-40 takes the largest traffic, and so it is a welcome, and slower pace to travel 64
Hwy 64, used to be a highly traveled road. I-40 takes the largest traffic, and so it is a welcome, and slower pace to travel 64 | Source
Arkansas Heritage Trail - Trail of Tears, and the Butterfield Trail.
Arkansas Heritage Trail - Trail of Tears, and the Butterfield Trail. | Source
Reflection of how long this leg of the walk was. Toward Pottsville, AR on Hwy 64
Reflection of how long this leg of the walk was. Toward Pottsville, AR on Hwy 64 | Source
6 miles to Atkins, 19 miles to Morrilton, AR and Point Remove
6 miles to Atkins, 19 miles to Morrilton, AR and Point Remove | Source

Can We Heal The Broken Paths?

How can we help heal the broken paths?

  • Acknowledge the horrors of disfranchisement, removal, and genocide of the Native American Tribal People's
  • Vow that you will never, in your lifetime, stand by and allow this type of injustice to occur again.
  • Pray for the healing of the heart-break of the Native American Peoples
  • Face the truth about what 'truths' the Americas are founded on.
  • Send love, be compassionate, and understand where Native American People are coming from.

If you care about human rights, and justice, perhaps it would be a good idea to gather the family, and check out the hundreds of miles of The Trail of Tears, in Arkansas, and the surrounding States.

When you do see a Heritage Trail sign, say a prayer. Sing a healing song. Burn some sage, help spread awareness, that the wounds may heal.

Along the Butterfield Trail, and Trail of Tears

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Hwy 64 crosses Jct 105, and routes to I-40At Atkins, AR Junction 105 N, and I-40 are crossroads.Atkins, Arkansas, along the Trail of TearsAtkins, The Trail of Tears, and the Butterfield TrailDid some of the walkers verve off of the Trail of Tears, and survive in the wilderness of Arkansas?Consider, in 1830, there were dirt trails. Human beings were herded like animalsThe remnants of structures along Hwy 64, Arkansas Heritage Trail.A long walk, from the Tribal Land, to Point Remove, Morrilton, AR
Hwy 64 crosses Jct 105, and routes to I-40
Hwy 64 crosses Jct 105, and routes to I-40 | Source
At Atkins, AR Junction 105 N, and I-40 are crossroads.
At Atkins, AR Junction 105 N, and I-40 are crossroads. | Source
Atkins, Arkansas, along the Trail of Tears
Atkins, Arkansas, along the Trail of Tears | Source
Atkins, The Trail of Tears, and the Butterfield Trail
Atkins, The Trail of Tears, and the Butterfield Trail | Source
Did some of the walkers verve off of the Trail of Tears, and survive in the wilderness of Arkansas?
Did some of the walkers verve off of the Trail of Tears, and survive in the wilderness of Arkansas? | Source
Consider, in 1830, there were dirt trails. Human beings were herded like animals
Consider, in 1830, there were dirt trails. Human beings were herded like animals | Source
The remnants of structures along Hwy 64, Arkansas Heritage Trail.
The remnants of structures along Hwy 64, Arkansas Heritage Trail. | Source
A long walk, from the Tribal Land, to Point Remove, Morrilton, AR
A long walk, from the Tribal Land, to Point Remove, Morrilton, AR | Source

Trail of Tears, Butterfield Trail, and Civil War Trails

show route and directions
A markerTrail of Tears, Heritage Trails, Arkansas USA -
Arkansas, USA
[get directions]

B markerPoint Remove, Morrilton, AR -
Point Remove Road, Morrilton, AR 72110, USA
[get directions]

C markerTrail of Tears -
Trail of Tears, Franklin, AR 72536, USA
[get directions]

D markerHwy 365, North Little Rock, AR -
Highway 365, North Little Rock, AR, USA
[get directions]

Butterfield Trail, Civil War Trail, Trail of Tears

E markerHwy 7, Arkansas -
Highway 7, AR, USA
[get directions]

Civil War Trail, Trail of Tears

F markerHwy 64, Arkansas -
U.S. 64, AR, USA
[get directions]

Trail of Tears markers, Hwy 64 westward to Morrilton, AR - Point Remove

Native American History - A Comanche Tech Production by Julian Guerrero Jr.

© 2013 Lori J Latimer

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Comments 6 comments

always exploring profile image

always exploring 3 years ago from Southern Illinois

I have never seen ' The trail of tears ' althought i visit Ak. frequently. ( My son lives in Ak. ) This is a wonderful article. America treated the Indian nation badly, just as we did the Blacks. May it never be repeated. I shared this on Google+ Thank you...


LillyGrillzit profile image

LillyGrillzit 3 years ago from The River Valley, Arkansas Author

always exploring, thank you for reading this, and commenting. Thank you for sharing this too. I will be adding photos of some of the Trails soon. Thank you!


torrilynn profile image

torrilynn 3 years ago

Hi LillyGrillzit,

thanks for this hub. it was very

informational and detailed . I learned

a lot.

Voted up


LillyGrillzit profile image

LillyGrillzit 3 years ago from The River Valley, Arkansas Author

torrilynn, Thank you for the read, and up votes!


JKWriter profile image

JKWriter 2 years ago from Right in the middle.

I grew up (mostly) in Arkansas. You are making me homesick. Love your articles! Voting up!


LillyGrillzit profile image

LillyGrillzit 2 years ago from The River Valley, Arkansas Author

@JKWriter thank you for the complement. Thanks for the vote up. Like everybody knows; once you have lived here more than a decade, you are "from here." Nice to make your acquaintance.

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