Ask DJ Lyons: Interpretive Center at Tallulah Gorge State Park

Visitor Center at Tallulah Gorge State Park

On Thursday, March 3, 2011, I drove nearly five hours to perform stories at Findley Oaks Elementary School in Johns Creek, Georgia near Duluth. It was a beautiful day. If it hadn't been for the fact that I wanted to get to my storytelling gig in plenty of time, I would have loved to stop and explore.

To make up for this, I decided in advance to drive the longer more scenic route on the way back to my home in Tennessee. I would drive through north Georgia, cut through North Carolina, and then back to my home in East Tennessee. I intended to stop at at least two parks on the way home.

Knowing that I would be buoyed by an adrenaline rush after the evening performance, I decided to drive about 1 1/2 hours toward home that night. This way, I would have that extra time to explore places to my heart's content. So I drove to Clayton, Georgia and stayed in a hotel there.

Friday morning, March 4th, was drizzly and overcast. I did not intend to let that stop me from enjoying the parks and vistas I intended to see. After eating my free continental breakfast, I checked out of my hotel and drove 12 miles south of my location to get to Tallulah Gorge State Park. This park is located in a little town called Tallulah Falls, Georgia.

When you drive into the park, you see that you need to pay a $5 parking fee. I get out and visit the visitor center first. Their official title is Interpretive Center. In this hub, you can see pictures of some of the displays they had set up. You will also see a photo of the map I took. Finally, you will see three pictures of some of their beautiful waterfalls that I took with an umbrella perched in such a way I could take pictures and protect my camera from the rain.

In another hub, you will be able to watch a video of the waterfalls and see even more pictures. I will include a link when that one gets published.

So, for your viewing pleasure, here are pictures of some of the displays at the Interpretive Center at Tallulah Gorge State Park. 

Interpretive Center at Tallulah Gorge State Park

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Visitor Center at Tallulah Gorge State Park in Tallulah Falls, GA display

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Bobcat

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Ground Hog

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Red Foxes

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White-Tailed Deer

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Raccoon

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Vulture

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Visitor Center at Tallulah Gorge State Park in Tallulah Falls, GA display #2

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Beaver

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Black Bears

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Coyote and Crow

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Gray Fox

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Gray Squirrels

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Great Horned Owl

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Mink on left; River Otter on right

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Pileated Woodpecker

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Sign for Tallulah Gorge State Park

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Map of Tallulah Gorge State Park in Tallulah Falls, Georgia

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View of Waterfall #1

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View of Waterfall #2

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View of Waterfall #3

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Wildlife and Waterfalls

Amphibians and Reptiles of Georgia
Amphibians and Reptiles of Georgia

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National Audubon Society Regional Guide to the Southeastern States: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, ... (National Audubon Society Field Guide)
National Audubon Society Regional Guide to the Southeastern States: Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, ... (National Audubon Society Field Guide)

Filled with concise descriptions and stunning photographs, the National Audubon Society Field Guide to the Southeastern States belongs in the home of every resident of the Southeast and in the suitcase or backpack of every visitor. This compact volume contains:

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Forest Plants of the Southeast and Their Wildlife Uses
Forest Plants of the Southeast and Their Wildlife Uses

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* 650 color photos

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Waterfall Hikes of North Georgia
Waterfall Hikes of North Georgia

Waterfall Hikes of North Georgia includes 60 hikes to more than 200 waterfalls, all on public land in the mountains of north Georgia. Each hike entry lists a general route desciption, mile-by-mile hiking directions and how to get to the trailhead, GPS coordinates, map and elevation profile, and photographs of the waterfall(s) to be seen. Waterfalls range from popular destinations like Anna Ruby Falls to major rapids like Bull Sluice and the remote cascades at Three Forks. Hike distances range from a few footsteps to 12+ miles; casual strollers and experienced hikers alike will find walks with waterfalls to suit their style, all within about an hour of metro Atlanta.

 

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Comments 2 comments

Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 5 years ago from Wales

Wow Debbie what a brilliant hub and definitly one that I am bookmarking.

It's a treat with all those beautiful photos to compliment the whole theme.

I love reading your hubs,

Take care

Eiddwen.


Ask_DJ_Lyons profile image

Ask_DJ_Lyons 5 years ago from Mosheim, Tennessee Author

Thanks, Eiddwen, so much! I love taking photos of the things that I see. With storing my photos on-line like this, I don't have to keep things in photo albums. I can simply post them and then delete them from my camera.

Have a happy day! Love ya,

Debbie

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