Camel Rides, Outback Safari Tours, Beach Camel Rides in Australia

While camels are not endemic to Australia there are many opportunities to enjoy short camel rides in many location in Australia and longer safaris in the Outback. The first Camels in were imported into Australia from the Canary Islands in 1840 and additional animals were brought in for the tragic Bourke and Wills expedition in 1860. Camel rides are very popular with tourists to Australia. Camels were the obvious choice for the exploring the many deserts in the heart of Australia and many early explorers used camels. It is estimated that about 10,000 Camels were brought into Australia between 1860 and 1907 to be used as draft and riding animals by early settlers and the explorers and their pioneering journeys through the dry interior. Camel teams generally consisting of 70 Camels, together carrying between about 20 tons travelled between 20 to 25 miles a day in desert country. Camel studs were first established in 1866, and additional studs operated for about 45 years and provided good breeding stocks and racing camels for the general population. The introduction of the railways and truck transport in the 1920 saw the end of the camel trains and large herds were released and they have established herds in the semi-arid desert areas of Australia.

Source
Camel Rides have alsways been very popular in Australia
Camel Rides have alsways been very popular in Australia | Source

There is a limited market for camel meat, and many camels have been exported, primarily racing camels. The wild camels have now become a pest and over $5 million dollars has been committed by the Australian Government to reduce their numbers.


The large range of outback camel safaris and adventures, located in the interior desert areas of Australia, offer unique eco-tourism adventures for experiencing the Real Outback. You will have a wonderful experience learning about desert ecology and the fascinating cultural history of the area. These fascinating treks are usually completely self-contained and genuine outback adventures. The camels carry everything your group needs including food, water, camping equipment and sleeping gear and of course you the rider. The camels will provide a relaxed, gentle and quiet ride though spectacular and pristine desert landscapes in outback South Australia and the Northern Territory near Alice Springs in the centre of Australia. You and be truly amazed and astounded by the beauty, ruggedness, remoteness, silence and pristine wilderness of the bush.

Australia has some of the best beaches in the world and there is always a wide range of recreational and tourist activities for the visitor to enjoy.

Camel safaris are much quieter and slower-paced than a 4WD adventure - with a lot more to hear, see, enjoy, feel, do and experience out in the open air rather than inside the cabin of a vehicle. You can also enjoy shorter ride camels near to the major towns and cities on day trips and beach treks from Broome (WA), to Noosa (South-east Queensland) and Cairns (tropical Northern Queensland). The famous camel rides along the magnificent Cable Beach in Broome, Western Australia are not to be missed. You can choose a sunset, pre-sunset and early morning camel ride in beautiful Broome. These camel train rides are also offered at several other locations along the coast of Australia, including Cairns. The rides are led by experienced guides who will look after you and the camels. The camel's wonderful easy gait and the comfortable designer saddles ensure a safe and pleasant ride. Generally you can use loading platforms or other aids to help you get up onto the camel and off safely, and avoid the stressing the camel. Camel ride and racing events are also on offer at several locations.

© janderson99-HubPages

© 2010 Dr. John Anderson

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