South African holidays offer "a world in one country" and treats for all the senses

A rainbow for the "Rainbow Nation". Scene at Storms River Mouth on the Garden Route. Photo by Tony McGregor
A rainbow for the "Rainbow Nation". Scene at Storms River Mouth on the Garden Route. Photo by Tony McGregor

A world in one country

South Africa is a country of great natural beauty, with wonderful people and a climate that is for most of the year quite idyllic. From the Mediterranean climate of the Western Cape to the sub-tropical climate of kwaZulu-Natal, from the lush mountain gorges of the north east corner of the country to the semi-desert of the West Coast and the Karoo, it is indeed, as the old tourism slogan would have it, “A world in one country” and a wonderful holiday destination.

Anyone wishing to find entertainment from sophisticated night life to rugged river safaris, from game lodges to extravagantly opulent hotels, the country can offer it all.

This Hub is just a brief overview of the amazing possibilities South Africa can offer to those wanting a holiday with a difference. South African holidays hold promises of fun, sun and even education making travel to South Africa great value for money.

The country has had its gut-wrenching moments of violence to vistas of peace, from mining gold in the depths of the earth to finding art of great beauty hidden in rocky overhangs in the mountains. The country boasts the highest bungee jumping site in the world and the deepest mine. It is a country of contrasts in both experience and ambience.

The recent history of the country has brought out the best and the worst in people, but over it all the blue skies and warm sun make it a place of welcome, a place where the sports lover and the music lover can both find their fill, where food and wine bring people together, where literature celebrates life and the fulfilling of dreams.

Besides the vibrant and lively present, South Africa also has a rich and varied history, dating back many millennia to the emergence of the first humans on the planet.

The fossil nick-named "Mrs Ples" who was actually more likely to have been "Mr Ples" is about 3.15 million years old an was discovered in the Sterkfontein Caves in 1947 by Dr Robert Broom
The fossil nick-named "Mrs Ples" who was actually more likely to have been "Mr Ples" is about 3.15 million years old an was discovered in the Sterkfontein Caves in 1947 by Dr Robert Broom
The first settlement in what became Johannesburg - Ferreira's Camp in 1886, soon after the "gold rush" began
The first settlement in what became Johannesburg - Ferreira's Camp in 1886, soon after the "gold rush" began
Bree Street in downtown Johannesburg, 2010. Photo by Tony McGregor
Bree Street in downtown Johannesburg, 2010. Photo by Tony McGregor

Johannesburg

Most people coming to South Africa will have their first taste of the country at the very modern O.R. Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg, the largest and busiest airport in Africa. The airport buildings have recently been upgraded and modernised to cope with the massive influx of fans who came for the Fifa 2010 Soccer World Cup and is now also connected to Sandton, in the north of Joahannesburg, by the high-speed train service known as the Gautrain. From O.R. Tambo to Sandton takes just a little more than 15 minutes on the Gautrain.

There are also several hotels close to the airport, including the luxury Sun International within the airport complex itself which offers a 24-hour service for meals and checking in and out.

Johannesburg is known in English as the “City of Gold” and in the Nguni languages as “eGoli” and in the Sotho languages as “Gauteng”, both names being synonymous with the English, as it is the centre of the gold mining industry. Gold was discovered there in 1886 and very quickly Johannesburg began to grow from, dusty mining camp to the huge metropolis it is today.

Something of the atmosphere and feel of old time Johannesburg can be found at the theme park known as Gold Reef City in the south of Johannesburg.

Close to Gold Reef City is the Apartheid Museum, a world-class exhibition focusing on the history of apartheid. “The museum is a beacon of hope showing the world how South Africa is coming to terms with its oppressive past and working towards a future that all South Africans can call their own.” (From the Apartheid Museum website.).

There are tours to Soweto (South Western Township) where in 1976 students rose up against the system of Bantu education, to the Sterkfontein Valley in which is found the World Heritage Site the Sterkfontein Caves where some of the world's most important fossil finds have been made, and within the city itself. One of the most famous of these is the Australopithcus africanus skull popularly known as "Mrs. Ples".

A markerKruger National Park -
Kruger National Park, Kruger Park, South Africa
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Kruger National Park

If game watching is your thing, then Kruger, as it's commonly known, is like heaven on earth, especially in the drier months when the vegetation is sparser, making game viewing easier.

Kruger is one of the biggest game park in Africa. It is about 360 kilometres in length (north to south) and about 65 kilometres wide (west to east). It is part of the larger Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park, which incorporates the Gonarezhou National Park in Zimbabwe, and with the Limpopo National Park in Mozambique.

The 20 parks managed by South African National Parks, (SANParks) number 20, including Kruger, and range from lush coastal parks to semi-desert areas. Bookings for any of the parks can be made through the centralised booking system at the SANParks website.

Kruger is home to 147 species of mammals (including the famous “Big Five”), more than any other game park in Africa. In addition about 517 species of birds are found there, of which about 253 are permanent residents.

The “Big Five” of game are lions, elephants, black rhinos, leopards and Cape Buffalo.

One of the biggest threats to Kruger's wildlife, especially rhinos, is poaching.

Within the park 21 rest camps provide accommodation with different levels of luxury. Anyone wishing to stay in one of the camps is advised to book well in advance as bookings are generally very popular.

The park can be accessed by road or by air. There are daily scheduled regional flights from O.R. Tambo to the Kruger Mpumalanga International Airport (KMIA) near Nelspruit. From there it is an easy drive in a hired car to one of the gates of the park.

A markerDurban -
Durban, South Africa
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The Grey Street Mosque in Durban. One of the largest mosques in the southern hemisphere. Photo by Tony McGregorMap of Port Natal by Francis FarewellHenry Francis FynnKing Shaka of the amaZulu
The Grey Street Mosque in Durban. One of the largest mosques in the southern hemisphere. Photo by Tony McGregor
The Grey Street Mosque in Durban. One of the largest mosques in the southern hemisphere. Photo by Tony McGregor
Map of Port Natal by Francis Farewell
Map of Port Natal by Francis Farewell
Henry Francis Fynn
Henry Francis Fynn
King Shaka of the amaZulu
King Shaka of the amaZulu

Durban

In December 1497 Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama sailed along a beautiful coastline with green grassy hills rolling down to pristine white sandy beaches. He named the area “Natal” or Christmas in Portuguese, in honour of the season of the Church calendar.. He and his crew were the first whites to see what has since become a popular holiday destination both for South Africans and for visitors from other parts of the world. The holiday capital of South Africa, Durban, developed in the lovely bay, becoming the biggest city on the east coast of Africa.

While not much is known about the early inhabitants of the area, by 1824 whites began to settle on the shores of what became known as Durban Bay. Among the first settlers there was one of the many colourful characters of South African history, the adventurer Henry Francis Fynn. Soon after arriving at what was then known as Port Natal in April 1824, Fynn and some of his men went to find the great King of the amaZulu, Shaka at his Royal place kwaBulawayo (not to be confused with the city of the same name in Zimbabwe), some 120 miles away.

During his stayat the Royal residence, an attempt was made on the King's life. A visiting warrior had stabbed Shaka with an assegai so severely that he was coughing blood and was at death's door for several days. Fynn, who had had some medical training at Christ's Hospital in London before coming to South Africa, was able to nurse the King back to health, and thus gained Shaka's trust. Shaka granted Fynn and his partner Francis Farewell occupation rights to an area around Port Natal, though it is doubtful that he meant them to set up a colony.

The natural harbour made Port Natal, renamed Durban in 1835, an excellent embarkation point for exports and the importance of it as a trading centre soon led to the town flourishing.

Durban today is the third largest city in South Africa with a unique character. Part of that uniqueness comes from the large concentration of people of Indian descent living there. Indentured workers were brought to Natal in from 1860 onwards to work in the growing sugar plantations along the North Coast, where conditions were almost perfect for the growing of sugar cane.

The harbour is the busiest in Africa. A new airport was opened just before the Fifa 2010 Soccer World Cup, the King Shaka International.

The Wilderness. Photo by Tony McGregor
The Wilderness. Photo by Tony McGregor
Kaaimans River Mouth with the highly unusual curved railway bridge. Photo by Tony McGregor
Kaaimans River Mouth with the highly unusual curved railway bridge. Photo by Tony McGregor
The Toll House at the foot of the Montagu Pass over the Outeniqua Mountains. The pass was completed in 1847. Photo by Tony McGregor
The Toll House at the foot of the Montagu Pass over the Outeniqua Mountains. The pass was completed in 1847. Photo by Tony McGregor
A markerKnysna -
Knysna, South Africa
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Outeniqua and the Garden Route

Possibly the most beautiful area in South Africa is the aptly-named “Garden Route” of the South Western Cape between the towns of Humansdorp to the east and Swellendam to the west. It lies in the area between the Outeniqua Mountains and the Indian Ocean, and is verdant, with rainfall all year.

The centre of the route is the ever-popular Wilderness on the mouth of the Kaaimans River with a string of lovely lakes to the east – the Langvlei, Rondevlei, Swartvlei and Ruigtevlei. These lakes stretch almost to the next popular part of the route, the scenic and historic town of Knysna.

Knysna is situated on what was the farm of one George Rex, reputed to have been the son of King George III and his mistress Hannah Lightfoot, though this is not certain. Rex lived on his farm, the called Melkhoutkraal, from 1804 to 1839, the year of his death. The town of Knysna was formed in 1882 by the amalgamation of two villages which had drown up in the area. The name Knysna is thought to be derived from the Khoi word for “ferns” or “fern leaves.”

Knysna is built on a lagoon which was for many years a thriving port for both commercial and defence purposes, though it is now only used for cruising and pleasure craft.

The town was built on the timber trade because of the lush and rich forests which flourished in the high rainfall area. Indeed one of the biggest trees in South Africa is found near Knysna, the so-called “Big Tree”, also known as the “King Edward VII Tree”, a yellow wood which grew to more than 40 metres in height with an eight metre circumference. It is believed to be more than 1700 years old.

George Bernard Shaw stayed five weeks in Knysna while writing The Black Girl in Search of God in 1932.

The Outeniqua Mountains were originally called the Serra de Estrella by the Portuguese explorers. The range runs more or less parallel to the coastline at a distance of some 16 to 32 kilometres. The area is rich in indigenous forests and abundant wild flowers because of the high rainfall.

Tble Mountain looks down onto the V and A Waterfront. Photo by Tony McGregor
Tble Mountain looks down onto the V and A Waterfront. Photo by Tony McGregor
Looking down from Table Mountain. Photo by Tony McGregor
Looking down from Table Mountain. Photo by Tony McGregor
Map of the Fynbos region from the book "A Fynbos Year" by McMahon and Fraser.
Map of the Fynbos region from the book "A Fynbos Year" by McMahon and Fraser.
Scene in the West Coast National Park. Photo by Tony McGregor
Scene in the West Coast National Park. Photo by Tony McGregor

Cape Town and the West Coast

Cape Town is known as the “Mother City” of South Africa and has a long and varied history from its foundation in April 1652 when Jan van Riebeeck landed there until now. The city is rich in cultural activities and historical places.

From the heights of Table Mountain to the bustling Victoria and Alfred Waterfront Cape Town is a tourist heaven, offering extreme sports and great shopping, as well as wonderful sights and places of interest, ranging from the Houses of Parliament to the Cultural History Museum, District Six and the Bo-Kaap.

To the south of the city is the Cape Peninsular and Kirstenbosch National Botanical Gardens. The Peninsular on which Cape Town is built has the richest floral kingdom in the world, with as estimated species count of almost 2300. Most of these are part of the so-called “Fynbos” Biome, which extends far beyond Cape Town to the north and east.

Artist Liz McMahon and photographer Michael Fraser produced a remarkable and beautiful book on fynbos called A Fynbos Year (David Philip, 1988) which is a collectors' item. It is richly illustrated with beautiful drawings and photographs.

Up the west coast there are many fascinating places with interesting histories and attractive old buildings.

One of these is the hamlet of Mamre, called after the Biblical village mentioned in Genesis 13: 18: “So Moses moved his tent and settled by the terebinths of Mamre at Hebron.” The settlement dates from 1701 when the Dutch East India Company set up a military post there. It became a centre of farming and Merino sheep were imported from the Spanish Royal stud and established there. The area around was settled by remnants of Khoi people. The mission at Mamre was started by Moravian missionaries and the church they had built in 1817 is based on German double-ended church style.

The West Coast National Park on the promontory between the Atlantic and Langebaan Lagoon is of particular interest. Inside the park is the little fishing village of Churchhaven.

Langebaan Lagoon is off Saldanha Bay, a huge, safe natural harbour which handles the export of iron ore from the Sishen iron mines in the Northern Cape Province.

Further up the West Coast are the villages of Paternoster, St Helena Bay, Elandsbaai and still further north the fishing town of Lamberts Bay.

Inland from the coast is the aptly-named Sandveld, a rather sandy and often dry stretch of land which has spring flowers which rival those of the more famous Namaqualand. The Sandveld economy is based on wheat, and there are also large herds of cattle and sheep, as well as potato farms.

The West Coast is also known for the character of its people, who are renowned as story tellers and cooks. West Coast cuisine has a particular character based on its largely sea-based economy and the rich cultural heritage of its people, a mixture of Dutch, German and Khoi. Even the language they speak is unique in South Africa. Colourful and interesting, to say the least!

Sunset over the Wilderness. Photo by Tony McGregor
Sunset over the Wilderness. Photo by Tony McGregor

Envoi

To close this Hub I quote a section from a wonderful book by Thomas Chalmers Robertson called A South African Mosaic (C.Struik Publishers, 1978):

“From the nature of their environment many South Africans have become intensely aware of the succession of natural and man-made events, which from the Earlier Stone Age to the Space Age transformed the landscape in which they live. They can follow the spoors of events on the veld of the great inland plateau, in the Bushveld savannah and even in the groves of forest giants that cower in mountain valleys where they have escaped the axe. The first diamond diggers sifted stone tools out of the terraced river gravels and the steel mouldboard plough tore them from the topsoil of the new maize fields; in a limestone quarry miners' dynamite exposed the fossil skull of a hominid child that played there more than a million years ago; a clay furnace, once stoked with goatskin bellows, has been excavated near where the coke ovens of a steelworks smoke today; and the stone circles stacked round living sites by people of the Uitkomst culture, the first men to use iron weapons and tools in their onslaught on the environment, have given place to the city of Gold – iGoli, as the blacks named Johannesburg. To the south, where the first whites came in their wagons, there was a natural wonder as remarkable as the prairies and the pampas – the sweetveld grasslands on which lived the greatest biomass of wild animals in the world. Soon it was fenced and grazed and ploughed under to become Africa's largest granary.”

Copyright Notice

The text and all images on this page, unless otherwise indicated, are by Tony McGregor who hereby asserts his copyright on the material. Should you wish to use any of the text or images feel free to do so with proper attribution and, if possible, a link back to this page. Thank you.

© Tony McGregor 2010

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Comments 42 comments

vaidy19 profile image

vaidy19 6 years ago from Chennai, India

Hi Tony,

Had a quick read. Would love to visit. Will read again.

Vaidy


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Wow - that was quick, Vaidy! Thanks for coming by and reading. Appreciated.

Love and peace

Tony


De Greek profile image

De Greek 6 years ago from UK

Right. I hope you have an extra room, because you talked me into it. I'll send you the arrival details so that you can pick me up :-)))


jandee 6 years ago

Hi Tony,me as well esp.after watching Morgan freeman in invictus and reading about lost ships and bounty of gold by Robben Island,thanks from m


Dim Flaxenwick profile image

Dim Flaxenwick 6 years ago from Great Britain

Oh What a wonderful country it seems to be. Absolutely beautiful hub. Thank you. It certainly makes one want to visit.

love and peace

Dim x


Mentalist acer profile image

Mentalist acer 6 years ago from A Voice in your Mind!

Thanks for the Tour of your exotic land TonyMac!;)


cameciob profile image

cameciob 6 years ago

What a wonderful hub for a great country. Thank you for posting it. I would like to travel and see it's cities and eat the local food.

Your pictures are great.


MartieCoetser profile image

MartieCoetser 6 years ago from South Africa

Ons vir jou Suid-Afrika! Excellent hub, Tony. Wonderful to know I’m right here!


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Dimitris - the carpet is vacuumed and there are flowers in a vase on the shelf for you and the lovely lady! Just pop me an email and I'll pick you up at ORT!

Maxine - you can have the other room. I'll put flowers in there for you also!

Dim - you can never know really how woderful this country is without a visit. So shall I try to fit you in somewhere between Dimitris and Maxine?

Mentalist - thanks for the comment. Appreciated!

Camelia - thanks for your kind words also. The food is great and the cities vibrant, so come on over!

Martie - ja, ons land is so mooi en ons mense so vriendelik en ek is ook bly jy's hier! Dankie vir jou woorde.

Thanks again all for participating on this tour!

Love and peace

Tony


mulberry1 profile image

mulberry1 6 years ago

This would be fascinating. Loved the photos too. Now, if I could just talk my husband into getting out of the house...


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Christine - I'm sure you can persuade him! Wives have their ways, don't they?

Thanks for the read and the comment.

Love and peace

Tony


LillyGrillzit profile image

LillyGrillzit 6 years ago from The River Valley, Arkansas

Very informative and I like the photos and National Park! Thank You.


Teresa Schultz profile image

Teresa Schultz 6 years ago from East London, in South Africa

This a wonderful overview of a lovely land - and you've taken and displayed some awesome photos - they're beautiful. Sadly, I haven't travelled around much here in South Africa, even though I love this country so much, but your hub has inspired me to maybe do a little overview of at least my hometown, then, (East London,) in SA, maybe this weekend. Thanks.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Lilly - thanks for the comment and you are most welcome!

Teresa - thanks for the kind words. I really love travelling around South Africa. East London is a lovely place too. Just didn't have enough space to include it here. Maybe sometime I will write about it also. Looking forward to reading your's!

Vikas - thank you so much for your kind words and glad you enjoyed!

Thanks again everyone - your comments make it all worthwhile, really!

Love and peace

Tony


killrats profile image

killrats 6 years ago from Cape town South Africa

TonyMac,

We do have a great country with amazing people, beauty, animal;s etc. We may be miles form no whee buy once people have been here the African dust will never be washed off.


always exploring profile image

always exploring 6 years ago from Southern Illinois

Very interesting and beautiful country. I would love to visit and pan for gold.

Great writing

Cheers, peace


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Thanks for the visit and comment, Killrats. This country of ours is indeed lovely and I am always so happy to share it! Love that bit about the dust!

Love and peace

Tony


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Ruby - not much panning for gold anymore, it's mostly deep level mining now! But a visit is also a good idea for many other reasons.

Thanks for stopping by.

Love and peace

Tony


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 6 years ago from Dallas, Texas

Amazing country where you live. Quite a tour, Tony. Almost as good as a visit. Very educational and interesting. The pictures are stunning. Thanks so much!


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Peg - thanks for your kind comment. It is always a pleasure to share this wonderful country with other people. So when can we expect you?

Love and peace

Tony


amillar profile image

amillar 6 years ago from Scotland, UK

Tony I'm jealous, it's midsummer here in Scotland, and I still have to switch what Billy Connelly calls 'the big slipper' on, to keep my feet warm; it might be my age though.

Another gem Tony.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Amillar - thanks for the visit and for your kind words. I appreciate your stopping by very much.

It's pretty cold here at the moment, but guess that's normal since it's midwinter!

Love and peace

Tony


lorlie6 profile image

lorlie6 6 years ago from Bishop, Ca

Ah Tony, people have such a negative impression of South Africa due to Apartheid. Thank you for sharing the beauty and being an ambassador of good will!

Lovely hub.


Storytellersrus profile image

Storytellersrus 6 years ago from Stepping past clutter

You could open a B&B with all the folk who wish to visit your exotic country. And photography classes as well. All that is missing is background music, lol. But I believe you provide that elsewhere, so I'm good.

Thanks for all the work you put into helping us understand the stunning landscape, history and people of South Africa. Kaaimans River Mouth catches my eye in particular.

Are there storytelling classes on the West Coast?


Loves To Read profile image

Loves To Read 6 years ago

Wonderful informative hub Tony. Yes it surely is a beautiful part of Gods Earth. I have always loved the documentaries made on South Africa and would love to be able to visit some day.

How beautiful to see Gods wildlife roaming in it's native habitat. You are a very lucky man to have all this at your fingertips.

Thanks for the very detailed travel guide and all the research so that we can see a slice of your wonderful country.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Laurel - thanks for the visit and the comment. I love to share with others the beauty and diversity of this lovely land.

Barbara - Kaaimans River Mouth is indeed a most gorgeous place. My mother's parents lived in George, which is now a journey of about an hour or less from the Mouth. They owned a cottage there and would go down to spend time at the mouth by ox-wagon, a journey of some days! Don't know wht happened to the cottage.

LTR - thank you and I do appreciate very much the richness of living here. It is indeed a privilege.

Thanks again everyone for your visits and kind words.

Love and peace

Tony


Micky Dee profile image

Micky Dee 6 years ago

You got room for me over there Tony? How's the cycling?


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Come on over, Micky, my buddy! The cycling's great and the people too! Thanks for stopping by.

Love and peace

Tony


Polly C profile image

Polly C 6 years ago from UK

Hi Tony, South Africa looks beautiful, and a really varied and interesting place to visit. I really would like to go there, but for the time being the airfare, for the whole family, remains too expensive. My sister visited Cape Town recently and showed us her lovely photos - unfortunately her stay was extended somewhat due to the volcanic ash (unfortunate because she didn't have any money left to do anything else!). She had photos of Table Mountain, but the photos I liked best were of the little penguins comically wandering past as her and her friend sat near the beach. Great hub anyway, maybe one day I'll get there!


equealla profile image

equealla 6 years ago from Pretoria, South Africa

Tony, it is always "lekker" in S.A. You know how I feel about Africa! Nice photos!


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Polly - yes, this country is amazing in so many ways. The penguins I guess were at penguin beach near Simonstown, were they? They are lovely little birds and very comical looking.

Francis - local is lekker, indeed!

Thanks to both of you for the visits and the comments which I really appreciate!

Love and peace

Tony


KoffeeKlatch Gals profile image

KoffeeKlatch Gals 6 years ago from Sunny Florida

My daughter visited South Africa the beginning of this year for a couple of weeks. She loved it. I believe she said Cape Town was awesome. Your pictures are beautiful.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

KKG - thanks so much for the visit and the comment. I really appreciate it that you took the time. I'm also glad your daughter enjoyed Cape Town - it is the best place in the world, in my totally unbiased (of course! LOL) opinion!

Love and peace

Tony


jroot2187 6 years ago

I just got back from South Africa. I was taken back with how beautiful it was (is) and how incredibly friendly the people are. I definitely preferred the area around Cape and the ocean (compared to Jo-burg and the area up north). Unfortunately I did not have time to go to Durban, but that would be another place I'd like to go to. Safaris, swimming with the sharks, Table Mountain, etc--overall it was just an incredible and memorable experience. Would/will definitely go back.


msorensson profile image

msorensson 6 years ago

Wow..they should appoint you an Ambassador..:-)

Who would not want to visit your country after reading such a beautiful and inviting hub?

I loved the hub and what wonderful pictures, Tony.

I think I will just go to two places if I were to go now. Cape Town and Johannesburg.


funny jokes 6 years ago

It's a great country. Thank you for posting it. I would like to travel and see it's cities and eat the local food.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Jroot - so glad you had such a good time here in South Africa. The Cape is my favourite place also!

Melinda - thanks for your very kind words!

Funny jokes - it's a lovely country to visit and the food is great too!

Thanks all for visiting and ledaving such great comment.

Love and peace

Tony


Tatjana-Mihaela profile image

Tatjana-Mihaela 6 years ago from Zadar, CROATIA

South Africa is very beautiful, especially nature. Thank you for sharing with us piece of its beauty.

Peace and love


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

Tatjana - thanks for coming by and commenting. Will be sharing some more very soon!

Love and peace

Tony


James A Watkins profile image

James A Watkins 6 years ago from Chicago

Thank you for publishing this lovely tour of South Africa. The photos are great, and I learned alot of historical facts as well. I enjoyed it a lot.


tonymac04 profile image

tonymac04 6 years ago from South Africa Author

James - thank you for reading and making such lovely comments. I am rreally gald that you enjoyed my little "guided tour" of this fascinating and beautiful country!

Love and peace

Tony


MelChi profile image

MelChi 4 years ago from Cape Town, South Africa

Living in Cape Town is almost like having a world in a city. Table Mountain, beaches, forests, city life, open green spaces - we are blessed to have it all.

Thanks for a great article, and for sharing the positive aspects of South Africa.

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