Discovering Dry Tortugas National Park

Dry Tortugas, one of the most remote and least-visited parks in the national park system, lies 70 nautical miles west of Key West on an archipelago of seven islands. Although it's difficult to get there, this fascinating park is worth the trip for any history buff, nature lover or outdoor adventurist.

With a strategic location in a deepwater harbor near the Gulf of Mexico's main shipping lane, Dry Tortugas' storied past includes pirates, shipwrecks, and Union soldiers. An underwater complex of coral reefs serves as home for abundant marine life, and tiny coral and sand islands are the nesting grounds for hundreds of thousands of birds and turtles each spring and summer. While only about 40 acres of the park's 100 square miles are above water, there's plenty to see and do in a day. A massive Civil War-era masonry fort awaits exploration, and tranquil beaches invite relaxation. For those who want experience life on a desert island Gilligan-style, a small primitive campground is available for longer stays.

The author (right) and friend at Dry Tortugas in February 2011
The author (right) and friend at Dry Tortugas in February 2011 | Source
Aerial view of Garden, Bush and Long Keys
Aerial view of Garden, Bush and Long Keys | Source
The lighthouse on Loggerhead Key
The lighthouse on Loggerhead Key | Source
The lighthouse at Fort Jefferson
The lighthouse at Fort Jefferson | Source

History of Dry Tortugas

The islands were first discovered in 1513 by Ponce de Leon, who named them for the turtles he found teeming in the clear blue water. Nautical charts later used the adjective "dry" to warn travelers that the islands lack fresh water.

Turtles provided a food source to the pirates who roamed the waters around the islands in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In 1825, a lighthouse was built on Garden Key to warn sailors of the treacherous coral reefs and shoals that have claimed at least 200 ships over the years. A second lighthouse was built on Loggerhead Key three miles to the west in 1857.

The United States Army Corps of Engineers began construction of Fort Jefferson on Garden Key in 1846 as a way to control navigation in the Gulf of Mexico. Construction continued for 30 years, but the fort was never finished. Designed to hold 420 guns and 1,500 men, Fort Jefferson never fired a hostile shot. Instead, it served as a prison for Civil War deserters and other criminals. Its most famous inmate was Dr. Samuel Mudd, who was convicted for conspiracy in the murder of President Abraham Lincoln after he set the broken leg of John Wilkes Booth. Dr. Mudd served four grueling years in a damp cell at Fort Jefferson until President Andrew Johnson pardoned him.

Conditions at the fort were harsh. Fresh water and food were scarce, construction work in the blazing tropical sun was grueling, and disease like yellow fever and scurvy was common. Advances in weapons technology rendered the fort obsolete by 1862 and the Army abandoned it in 1874.

The U.S. Navy later used the fort as a coaling station until 1907. In 1908, the area was designated a wildlife refuge. President Franklin Roosevelt declared it a national monument in 1935, and in 1992 it became a national park.


Getting to Dry Tortugas

The only way to reach Dry Tortugas is by boat or seaplane. The high speed Ferry Yankee Freedom II provides daily service to the public, as does Key West Seaplane Adventures. Private fishing and dive charters also may be arranged. Private boats are allowed, but must be self-sufficient, permitted, and anchor in designated areas only. While there is small gift shop at the fort, there is no food, water or fuel sold anywhere on the island. Bring everything you will need for the length of your stay.


Fort Jefferson rises into view from an expanse of blue water as the ferry approaches
Fort Jefferson rises into view from an expanse of blue water as the ferry approaches | Source
The Yankee Freedom III offers high speed ferry service daily from Key West to Dry Tortugas
The Yankee Freedom III offers high speed ferry service daily from Key West to Dry Tortugas | Source
Seaplanes make multiple daily trips to Dry Tortugas from Key West
Seaplanes make multiple daily trips to Dry Tortugas from Key West | Source
Arriving at the dock at Garden Key
Arriving at the dock at Garden Key | Source

Getting there by boat

The Dry Tortugas Ferry, the Yankee Freedom III, departs daily from the Key West harbor at 8:00 a.m., returning at 5:30 p.m. The fare, $170 for adults, includes breakfast and lunch, park entrance fee, a guided tour of Fort Jefferson, and complimentary snorkel equipment. Additional food and drink are available for purchase from the boat's galley.

The boat trip takes about two hours and 15 minutes each way. On the way out, an on-board guide will point out the Marquesa Islands, the Atocha wreck site, and any wildlife encountered along the way. Take Dramamine before departure if you are prone to motion sickness or the sea is choppy.

Getting there by seaplane

Key West Seaplane Adventures offers half- and full-day trips to Dry Tortugas. At 40 minutes each way, this is the fastest way to reach the park. Book early as flights fill up, especially during the spring months when the weather is optimal. The price is $265 for adults for a half-day excursion (2 1/2 hours of island time) and $465 for a full-day trip (6 1/2 hours on the island). Complimentary soft drinks, snorkel gear, and coolers with ice are provided. You must provide your own food and $5 park fee.


Planning your visit to Dry Tortugas National Park

What to bring on a day trip:

  • Wind breaker
  • Walking shoes
  • Sunglasses
  • Hat
  • Sunscreen
  • Swimming suit
  • Towel
  • Change of clothes
  • Camera
  • Binoculars
  • Small cooler with food and drinks



Exploring Fort Jefferson

 The moat and entrance to Fort Jefferson
The moat and entrance to Fort Jefferson | Source

Fort Jefferson is architecturally significant as the largest masonry structure in the Western Hemisphere. An estimated 16 million bricks were used in its construction. The fort is a six-sided, three-tiered structure that stands 45 feet high and features eight-foot thick walls, a moat and 2,000 archways.


A row of arches connecting the casements on the bottom tier of the fort
A row of arches connecting the casements on the bottom tier of the fort | Source
Visitors in awe of the workmanship
Visitors in awe of the workmanship | Source


There is impressive masonry work on display throughout the fort, particularly in the vaulted ceilings and arches. The arches were constructed with wooden frames built by carpenters over which skilled masons laid bricks and mortar. Look carefully at the vaulted ceiling in the chapel on the fort's second tier and you will see a brick signed by master bricklayer J.N.O. Nolan in 1859.


The master bricklayer's signature on the ceiling of the chapel
The master bricklayer's signature on the ceiling of the chapel | Source

Years of exposure to saltwater and wind have caused significant deterioration to the fort. In places, the brick walls have crumbled into the moat. A restoration project is underway.


Evidence of deterioration
Evidence of deterioration | Source
After restoration
After restoration | Source

The parade grounds in the center of the fort held living quarters for the officers and soldiers, gunpowder magazines, storehouses, and other buildings required to maintain the fort. During its peak years, close to 2,000 people lived at the fort. The soldiers' barracks were destroyed in a fire in 1912; the ruins are still visible on the parade grounds.


Ruins of the officers' barracks (right) and kitchens
Ruins of the officers' barracks (right) and kitchens | Source
The fully-restored hot-shot furnace, with one of the fort's 37 powder magazines behind it
The fully-restored hot-shot furnace, with one of the fort's 37 powder magazines behind it | Source
A big gun on display on the parapet
A big gun on display on the parapet | Source
A guide explains how the guns worked
A guide explains how the guns worked | Source

The fort was designed to hold 420 guns. The guns were mounted inside the walls in a string of open casemates, or gunrooms, facing outward toward the sea through large openings called embrasures. The largest guns weighed 25 tons each, took seven men to fire, and could launch a 432 pound projectile at ships up to three miles away. Several big guns remain on display throughout the fort.

The fort's plans called for 37 gunpowder magazines to be located throughout the fort and grounds. Most were built right into the walls of the fort for easy accessibility but five were designed to be freestanding buildings.


Inside a powder magazine
Inside a powder magazine | Source
Birds nesting on Bush Key
Birds nesting on Bush Key | Source
Marine life at Dry Tortugas
Marine life at Dry Tortugas | Source

Things to do at Dry Tortugas

  • Take a self-guided tour of the fort. As you explore, imagine the harsh conditions experienced by the soldiers and prisoners who lived there.
  • Walk the .6 mile seawall and look for marine life, including the endangered green sea turtle and threatened loggerhead turtle.
  • Snorkel and swim off the white sand beach. Look but don't touch, as coral is delicate and easily damaged.
  • Have lunch in the picnic area outside the fort or in a shady spot on the parade grounds.
  • Explore the visitor's center and book shop inside the fort.
  • View thousands of sooty terns nesting on Bush Key. While the island is closed during nesting season, the birds are easily observed by binocular from the fort's parapet.
  • Dive the Windjammer wreck off Loggerhead Key (by private charter).
  • Camp on Garden Key.


Locating the Dry Tortugas

A markerDry Tortugas National Park -
Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida, USA
[get directions]

Camping on Garden Key
Camping on Garden Key | Source

More by this Author


Comments 13 comments

Arlene V. Poma 4 years ago

Never heard of the place, but thanks for taking me there with your writing and photographs. Other than catching a cruise ship, I don't know the area. Wouldn't mind exploring. Voted up and everything else.


DeborahNeyens profile image

DeborahNeyens 4 years ago from Iowa Author

Thanks, Arlene. Glad I could take you somewhere new. By the way, I'm loving the new profile pic. You look like a super hero. : )


Arlene V. Poma 4 years ago

Hahahahaha. Thanks, Deborah. My hubby quit watching the WWE wrestling a long time ago, and I remember this wrestler on there who always wore a mask. He was little--like me. A little pudgy man who took on the guys that were probably around 6'4". About my husband's size. Yeah! His name was Ray Mysterio. Hahahahaha. I'm dying!


alocsin profile image

alocsin 4 years ago from Orange County, CA

Never even heard of this place, but it sounds intriguing. Thanks for the headsup. Voting this Up and Interesting.


DeborahNeyens profile image

DeborahNeyens 4 years ago from Iowa Author

Thank you, alocsin. I love being able to share new places with people. I hope you get there some day.

Arlene, you are cracking me up. You need to write a WWE hub.


Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

Hi Deborah,

What a wonderful hub about visiting the Dry Tortugas! Your information and photos should encourage more people to visit this off the beaten track national park. That fort is really something to view! I just added a link from this hub to my latest...The Water World of the 3 National Parks in Florida. Hope that many people read this hub of yours! Voted up, useful, interesting and will share.


DeborahNeyens profile image

DeborahNeyens 3 years ago from Iowa Author

Thanks, Peggy! And I added a link right back to your excellent hub.


PegCole17 profile image

PegCole17 3 years ago from Dallas, Texas

Fantastic tour through this fascinating place. Wow. I felt as if I were there with you through the pictures and explanations. I lived in Key West for many years but never visited this attraction. Now I want to take the tour! This is absolutely amazing: the brick work, the sea life and the history of the place being used as a prison. Incredible.


DeborahNeyens profile image

DeborahNeyens 3 years ago from Iowa Author

Thanks, Peg. I had been to Key West many, many times but never made the trip out to the Tortugas until 2011. I went with a friend while my husband and her husband were off on a fishing charter. But I know I will go back because now my husband wants to see it, too!


truthfornow profile image

truthfornow 3 years ago from New Orleans, LA

Looks very beautiful. I have been to Key West, but never to this place. It looks so cool. The fort is very interesting and seems to be in good condition. I liked the video, it was a nice touch.


DeborahNeyens profile image

DeborahNeyens 3 years ago from Iowa Author

Thanks, truthfornow. It's an adventure just getting to Dry Tortugas but definitely worth the trip. Glad you liked the video. I just found it on the National Park Service website and added it to the hub this week.


Dwight Phoenix profile image

Dwight Phoenix 21 months ago from Jamaica

Great hub..I must go there one day.


DeborahNeyens profile image

DeborahNeyens 20 months ago from Iowa Author

Thanks, Dwight. I hope you make it there some day. It's pretty awesome.

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