Gosanimari excavations

An excavated well at the site
An excavated well at the site
Beautiful green at the mound
Beautiful green at the mound
Huge stone slabs excavated at the site
Huge stone slabs excavated at the site
Inside of a well
Inside of a well
One of the excavated wells
One of the excavated wells
The lady is dwarfed by the size of the well
The lady is dwarfed by the size of the well
The signboard put up by ASI at the mound
The signboard put up by ASI at the mound
Part of the excavated wall
Part of the excavated wall
The Rajpat Mound, Gosanimari, Cooch Bihar
The Rajpat Mound, Gosanimari, Cooch Bihar
Huge stone slab with holes
Huge stone slab with holes
The official signboard at the mound
The official signboard at the mound
The pond at the foot of the mound, probably a part of the ancient moat surrounding the citadel
The pond at the foot of the mound, probably a part of the ancient moat surrounding the citadel
The southern wall
The southern wall
The site where many stone structures have been excavated
The site where many stone structures have been excavated
Up on the mound
Up on the mound

Gosanimari excavations : Reliving the glorious past of Bengal

Gosanimari is near the town of Dinhata in the northern district of Cooch Bihar (also called Cooch Behar), West Bengal, India.

It was the ancient capital of the erstwhile kingdom of Kamta, which was under the ruling of the Pala & Sena dynasty of Gaud-Pandua (11th-12th Century AD) & later ruled by the Khen dynasty from 14th century AD to 1498 AD when the last Khen king Nilambara was defeated by Sultan Hussein Shah of Gaud (now Maldah), & then after some turmoil of indefinite rulers, by the Koch dynasty from early 16th century AD, the first Koch king being Maharaja Viswa Singha. The kingdom of Kamta was later named Cooch Bihar, the term “Cooch” being an Anglicized version of the word “Koch”, and after merger with India in 1949 was made a district of the state of West Bengal.

Gosanimari area of present-day Cooch Bihar is about 35 km from the town of Cooch Bihar, the district headquarters. It boasts of the ancient temple of the goddess Kamateswari, the present temple being established by the king Maharaja Pran Narayan in 1665 AD. The original temple is believed to be buried under earth at a place called RAJPAT about 1 km from the present temple.

The word Rajpat is derived from the Bengali word “Rajbati” meaning King’s Palace. The area is actually a huge mound or better be called a small hillock, now surrounded by a wire fence & under care of ASI (Archaeological survey of India). ASI has carried over two excavations in the area & discovered some medieval structure buried under the soil.

The important findings are two huge brick-built wells, a long brick-built wall which was probably a part of the fortification of a fort or citadel, some stone structures & few stone idols which were transferred to Cooch Bihar museum located in the Palace in the town of Cooch Bihar.

The undulating hillocks are covered with green grass & present a view pleasant to the eyes. There is a pond on one side, which was most probably a part of a moat surrounding the citadel.

The place has nothing more to offer to the visitors now, but after getting there you will feel a strange urge to look under the soil for more of the ancient relics. It was like standing in front of a close door, behind which the history is beaconing.

Gosanimari definitely deserves a more prominent place in the tourism map of West Bengal.

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