Madison County, Iowa: More Than Just Covered Bridges!

Somewhere in Winterset.

I have no idea now where this house was in Winterset.  It simply looked like Small Town Iowa, so I snapped a pic as we drove by.
I have no idea now where this house was in Winterset. It simply looked like Small Town Iowa, so I snapped a pic as we drove by. | Source

A hub with un-touristy photos too good not to share from four trips to Madison County, Iowa, and the county seat, Winterset, in the fall of 1994, plus a Youtube video from the annual Covered Bridge Festival which truly captures the spirit and boundless enthusiasm of Madison Countians.

But first, how Winterset got its unusual name.

Madison County was named for James Madison, fourth president of the United States. Until 1848, for election and taxation purposes, it and Warren County, its next-door neighbor on the east, were part of Marion County. In April 1849, Madison County finally was "set off" - came into its own as a separate county - at which point a site for the county seat had to be chosen. This honor was bestowed on a parcel of land on John Guiberson's farm.

The next order of business was choosing a name for the new town that would arise.

The favorite was "Summerset", which may've been a play on the name of Pennsylvania's Somerset county and town. However, that July day happened to be unseasonably cold, prompting one shivering committee member to put forth "Winterset" instead.

So now you know... Winterset got its name purely by a fluke of nature.

A video that captures the spirit of Madison Countians.

NOTE: The video above is by WayneD8 at Youtube. But all of the still photos in this hub were made by me, JamaGenee, before camera crews and Clint and Meryl arrived to film the movie "The Bridges of Madison County"...i.e. before Winterset turned into just one more stop for tour buses and souvenir hunters.

You won't see this shot of Roseman Bridge on postcards...

Source
Source

...Or the one at right.

In 1992, Madison County spent over $100,00 renovating the 107-foot Roseman Covered Bridge.

Barely two years later, producers of the movie "The Bridges of Madison County" declared the Roseman "didn't look old", as it would have in the 1960s when Francesca Johnson and Robert Kincaid rendezvoused there.

So what you see here is part of work to "un-spiff" the bridge for its film debut.

Much of the new paint from 1992 had already been scraped to look "weathered". (The movie company would repaint after filming finished).

The gaps in the siding and planks on the protruding support beams on the side were so camera crews could shoot scenes inside the bridge.

And you didn't see THIS in the movie!

More of what it took to get Roseman ready for the big screen.
More of what it took to get Roseman ready for the big screen. | Source

Or THIS!

Some enterprising soul didn't let drop cloths, ladders and a bulldozer deter him from opening a "Bridges" souvenir shop a stone's throw from the approach to Roseman!
Some enterprising soul didn't let drop cloths, ladders and a bulldozer deter him from opening a "Bridges" souvenir shop a stone's throw from the approach to Roseman! | Source

Madison County, Iowa

For accuracy's sake, St. Charles is only the "gateway to the bridges" if you're coming into Madison County from Interstate 35 (see map above) at the eastern edge of the county.
For accuracy's sake, St. Charles is only the "gateway to the bridges" if you're coming into Madison County from Interstate 35 (see map above) at the eastern edge of the county. | Source

The bridge behind (and depicted in) the rustic sign above is the Imes Covered Bridge located one mile off I-35 near St. Charles, Iowa. Built in 1870, Imes is the oldest of Madison County's remaining covered bridges. In 1877, it was moved from its original location to a spot over Clanton Creek near Hanley, Iowa, where it remained until 1977 when it was moved again to its present location. Somehow I think moving a 117-year-old wooden bridge would be much easier than moving a two-story house the same age, but then residents of Madison County have quite a bit of practice in bridge moving. Very few of its famous bridges haven't been moved!

Clanton Creek, of course, was named after the first families to settle on it headed by three brothers of Ruth (nee Clanton) Clark, wife of Caleb. Clark Memorial Tower at the far edge of Winterset City Park was built in Ruth and Caleb's memory by four of their grandsons.

Source

Cedar Covered Bridge

The photo at right is my youngest pretending to be supporting the original Cedar Covered Bridge located north of Winterset over Cedar Creek.

Back then, pretending to hold up large structures like bridges and distant farms with one hand was his idea of Cutting Edge Photography. (Whatever....)

Although I'm sure we took more conventional photos of the top side of Cedar, this is the only one can find in the pile. A real shame, because the bridge you see here was destroyed by arsonists in 2002 and a new version built to replace it in 2004.

Cedar is the only Madison County covered bridge which vehicles can use. The county installed security cameras on the new bridge to deter further vandalism.

The BACK of John Wayne's birthplace in Winterset.

A shame that ramp to the Gift Shop cuts across such a lovely back yard.  Even so, I have NO problem imagining Winterset's most famous resident playing out there as a boy.
A shame that ramp to the Gift Shop cuts across such a lovely back yard. Even so, I have NO problem imagining Winterset's most famous resident playing out there as a boy. | Source
At 6' 6", the full-grown Duke most likely had to bend his head to get inside his boyhood home!
At 6' 6", the full-grown Duke most likely had to bend his head to get inside his boyhood home! | Source

What?

You never snapped a photo of the back of some famous person's childhood home?

Okay, as a rule I don't either.

But in the photo at right of the front of the Morrison home, the building to the right and behind it housing the Gift Shop looks to be just another, more modern house on the same block.

Just wanted to clarify that is isn't.

Have a great day!!

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Comments 58 comments

Peggy W profile image

Peggy W 4 years ago from Houston, Texas

Hi JamaGenee,

That does it! The Winterset Chamber of Commerce should be signing you up soon to be on their membership committee with all of the free publicity that you are giving them. Enjoyed reading about the history of the name Winterset and all the other info. in this latest hub of yours. Up, useful and interesting votes.


sandrarosen42 profile image

sandrarosen42 4 years ago from Texas

Great information - loved the photos!


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

Peggy, I'd just be happy to have a guaranteed - NOT comped, only guaranteed - room at a local hostelry if I ever go back. On the second or third of those four trips, the closest vacancy was 50 miles away in Corning. Luckily it was a clear, late summer evening which made for a pretty (starlit) drive back from dinner at the Northside Cafe. But I do have another stack of pix of places in Winterset that aren't there any more or went from being the typical stores you'd find around the square in any small, Midwest town to shops selling little else but movie souvenirs.

Thanks, sandrarosen42! Glad you enjoyed the hub and the photos. My goal is to inform as well as entertain!


christopheranton profile image

christopheranton 4 years ago from Gillingham Kent. United Kingdom

Interesting, and enjoyable article, with some great photos. One thing I must ask however. Why did they have covered bridges?


Huntgoddess profile image

Huntgoddess 4 years ago from Midwest U.S.A.

Hey, very nice, JG. I've never seen the movie, actually.

My city has also had the miserable misfortune of having been in "the movies", because there was some sort of legislation that gave tax breaks to Hollywood movie-making moguls --- for some strange reason.

But, the legislation was revoked after the making of "Public Enemy" --- the making of which cost the state quite a bit in damaged infrastructure, among other things. It certainly did not create any new jobs, or bring new tourists. We already have way too many tourists in Wisconsin.

Take care. Great Hub.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

Thanks, christopher! Back when bridges were all (or mostly all) wood, they were built with roofs and side walls to protect the most important part, the floor, from damage by the elements. They also provided emergency shelter for travelers unlucky enough to be caught in a storm.

Huntgoddess, if you ever come across the DVD, DO see "Bridges". Hopefully, you won't have to see it twice, as I did, to get past Meryl Streep's portrayal of Francesca, Italian war bride. The movie was made in the days when Streep was known for using what she thought were appropriate accents for foreign or immigrant roles, and usually they were, but not in "Bridges".

I grew up in Kansas, which has a rather active state film commission to lure Hollywood filming bucks. However, it tries to steer location scouts to structures or infrastructure already scheduled for demolition (if that's part of the story). Otherwise the policy is "You break it, you fix it" once filming is finished.

Winterset DID get a lot of new tourists from its movie. But I think that's partly because it was also John Wayne's birthplace, so after the movie, it was a natural two-fer for tourists.

As for creating jobs, in my hometown at least, at one point it got to be a joke that yes, a location movie DID create jobs...sort of. Film crews would hire students from the local college's theater department as extras, then take favorites back to Hollywood when they left town! One student waited until after graduation to move to L.A., but kept having a recurring nightmare that he'd finally land a role, but in a movie shot in Kansas. And that's exactly what happened! ;D


Arlene V. Poma 4 years ago

I read the book a long time ago, and I'm so slow when it comes to viewing movies. I recently saw Clint and Meryl as the lovers who come together, then break up forever once the husband comes home from the fair. I am drawn to small towns because I grew up in one. I would not mind visiting. Lots of stories about John Wayne/Marion Morrison. One nutritionist told me that Wayne was strictly a man who lived on the "Caveman's Diet." Otherwise, he would still be alive or at least lived a little longer. Voted up and everything else. Bookmarked for "someday."


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

Arlene, a super-macho GUY of all people recommended the book to me, but failed to mention it was fiction, so I cried buckets the night I stayed up til the wee hours to find out if Francesca ever saw Robert Kincaid again. There's a lesser-known sequel to the first book in which Robert returns to Winterset to see Francesca, but I forget the name of it. (And I won't tell you how IT ends.)

I once lived in a "quad" (four bedrooms around a common kitchen-dining area) near UNLV, and one of the quad-mates was an older gentleman, a photographer, who was a good friend of the Duke. He spent many weekends on Wayne's converted (PT boat?? Navy destroyer?) off Catalina, so I heard all about JW's "Caveman Diet". A pity "livin' large" isn't as *healthy* as it's cracked up to be.


robie2 profile image

robie2 4 years ago from Central New Jersey

Oh boy Jama-- I am really enjoying your " Winterset series" here on Hubpages and this one is just the best best best. The bridges, how the town got its name and that video-- we are talking fabulous. I hit all the buttons on voting it up.


christopheranton profile image

christopheranton 4 years ago from Gillingham Kent. United Kingdom

That makes sense. Thanks for taking the time to tell me.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

You're most welcome, christopheranton. I, too, used to wonder why they were covered.

Thank you muchly, robie2. Actually, it should be the "WIN--- Series". The next hub will be about WINdsor, the castle and the town. ;D


Huntgoddess profile image

Huntgoddess 4 years ago from Midwest U.S.A.

Thanks for the comment, JG. Yes, I do plan to see it --- someday. I've been a little disgusted with Clint Eastwood since I've heard what he did to his former girlfriend. I used to be madly in love with him before that, though. (Just like everybody, right?)

Well, I certainly do like Kansas' philosophy better than ours --- regarding the movies. I really hope we don't have any of that nonsense again. PE wasn't even a good movie.

Oh, man, that's weird about that student who moved to L.A.

Thanks for the great --- as always --- info.

PS: I've always been curious about your profile pic. It's a painting, right? Is it of you? Or, did you make it? Just nosy. None of my beeswax, of course.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

Huntgoddess, my profile pic isn't a painting per se, only part of a travel poster that struck my fancy. Another hubber had found a Flapper-era image that looks uncannily like her. My original avatar was in the same vein but looked *nothing* like me. But the girl in the poster DOES, so I've been using a scaled-down version ever since. It has become my "brand". Thanks for asking. You're the first to do so in the almost 4 years I've been at Hubpages! ;D


Billrrrr profile image

Billrrrr 4 years ago from Cape Cod

I first watched the movie this weekend. I don't know how I missed it all this time, but I did. Then by coincidence I spotted this great hub after reading your response to a cat question that I also responded to.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

Ah, yes...the ridiculous cat question ("Can cats be trained?"). Loved your reply to that one!

As for the movie, considering the hype when the book came out and THEN the movie, I don't know how you missed it, either. You DO get extra points, though, for choosing to watch (albeit 20 years after the fact) what's essentially the epitome of tear-jerker "chick flicks". Glad you enjoyed the hub! ;D


klanguedoc profile image

klanguedoc 4 years ago from Canada

My wife and I watched this movie several times since it was first released. It was and still is a great movie and a wonderful story. Winterset and Madison County look really charming.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

klanguedoc, Winterset and Madison County are even more charming in person than what you see in the movie...or in photos and Youtube videos. If you ever have a chance to go there, you won't be disappointed! ;D


klanguedoc profile image

klanguedoc 4 years ago from Canada

We would to trek across the US, someday. Madison County would definitely be on the list.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

klanguedoc, since Madison County is so close to Des Moines, you could plan to stay overnight in DM and make Winterset and Madison County a day trip. However, to get the full impact of Madison County's charms, I definitely recommend staying in Winterset! A Friday through Saturday if possible. Fri night seems to be the evening the town is at its liveliest. Enjoy!


pinto2011 profile image

pinto2011 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

Quite enthralling and well covered.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

pinto2011, thank you for dropping in and reading! I consider it high praise, indeed, that you found this hub "enthralling and well covered"! ;D


Nell Rose profile image

Nell Rose 4 years ago from England

Hi, I loved the film Madison county, and I remember the bridges, because we don't have these at home here, I never knew where it was filmed though, I know, duh! lol! really interesting, thanks!


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

Thanks, Nell! You may not have covered bridges on your side of the Pond, but you DO have houses and buildings 500 (or more) years old. And, of course, the royals with the pageantry that comes with. I find all that infinitely more interesting than a wooden bridge that happens to have a roof! ;D


Perspycacious profile image

Perspycacious 4 years ago from Today's America and The World Beyond

How far from Cedar Rapids? My 6 grandchildren could really enjoy a mystery ride, if the mystery isn't how far it is?


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

Perspycacious, it looks like Cedar Rapids is approx 150 from Winterset. South from CR on 380 to I-80, then west on I-80 all the way around Des Moines metro to Exit 110 (De Soto), then south on 169 to Winterset.

Or if you want the scenic route, when you're past Des Moines, go south on I-35 to Exit 52 (St. Charles) and west through St. Charles where you'll see the Imes Covered Bridge. Follow signs from St Charles into Winterset.

159 miles may sound like a lot, but my experience on the interstates in central Iowa was that the miles seemed to go by more quickly. Perhaps because it's so flat there. One time we went to Winterset, the only available rooms were in Corning, approx 50 miles away, but the drive back after dinner seemed a lot shorter.

Anyway, it sounds like a great Mystery Ride for your grandkids! Have fun! Maybe do a hub about it after???


Marcy Goodfleisch profile image

Marcy Goodfleisch 4 years ago from Planet Earth

I love the photos you included here! I have visited Iowa a few times, and I've always wanted to return. The countryside is charming, and the bigger cities have all the amenities you'd want. Very nice hub! Voted up, interesting and beautiful.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

Thanks, Marcy! And thank YOU for pointing out that Iowa has something for everybody...big city life AND charming small towns only a short drive from one another. It doesn't get much better than that! ;D


Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

I loved this one ad vote up plus bookmark into my Armchair Travelling slot.

Take Care And Enjoy your day.

Eddy.


Keri Summers profile image

Keri Summers 4 years ago from West of England

I really enjoyed this Hub. It's great to have some local insights and photos to an area, especially when we think we know the place through movies. Was glad to read the answer about why the bridges were covered, 'cos I was wondering that too.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

Eiddwen, it never occurred that this hub could be an addition to anyone's Armchair Traveling file, but of course it would! Thanks for the heads up!

Keri, you are so right that one doesn't necessarily "know" a place from what's shown in movies. Seeing Madison County being prepped for its debut on the silver screen was quite an eye opener! I was especially tickled to see the movie people undoing the county's recent (and expensive) restoration of Roseman Bridge just for a few minutes on film...and then re-restore it after! I only wish the owners of the Northside Cafe had opted to have it returned to the way it was before filming began. It had MUCHO more charm before it was "spiffed up".


billybuc profile image

billybuc 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

Maybe I'm missing something! Maybe I should read more of your hubs! But the easy way out is to simply ask why a girl in Oklahoma writes about Iowa so often? My family is from Iowa so this one got my attention quickly. I agree with one of the other comments that you should be getting paid by the Chamber of Commerce for this excellent article.

Here's to many more fascinating hubs by both of us and a continued friendship.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

Bill, the "easy" answer to your question about why a girl in OK writes about Iowa is that my maternal gr-gr-grandparents followed a daughter and her preacher husband from SW Pennsylvania to Adams Co IA in the early 1860s. Other family members followed THEM and settled in Corning, but "Grandma" and "Grandpa" are buried at Mt Etna.

My first visit to Iowa is recounted in my "Wild Weekend" hub. It was on that trip I totally fell in love with Iowa. Have been back several times and still love it!

By now you probably know I've been researching family history for about 30 years, so of course I had to check if I have anybody in my database named Holland. I have one, a Leona born in 1885 in Polk Co, Iowa; married a Willoughby. If you're related to Leona or the Willoughbys that went to KS and then to Washington state, we'll **definitely** have to continue this conversation by email! ;D


billybuc profile image

billybuc 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

Jama, not my family; the Hollands were mostly from Missouri; my mother's side of the family was from Charles City, Iowa and my dad's mother ended up living there. My mother's side were O'Dowds so if you ever do a random search and come up with anything let me know and I would appreciate it.

I visited Iowa several times when I was young and fell in love with the farming communities and the tall rows of corn and different lifestyle. If I were to ever live in the Midwest it would be in Iowa.

Thank you my friend! Oh, all I know about Oklahoma is they now have our professional basketball team; not a ringing endorsement by a long shot. :) Now, however, I have a growing friendship with an Oklahoman so things are looking up.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

Bill, I must say, on the one hand I'm relieved the Hollands were from Missouri so I don't have to email yet another set of family history to a new "cousin". On the other hand, I'm rather disappointed. (Confusing, huh?) I was quite looking forward to having you as a "shirttail" cousin! Oh, well (sniff..sniff).

O'Dowd, huh? Nope, no O'Dowds in the d-base, only Doud. But now I WILL keep my eyes peeled for O'Dowd and let you know if I find anything.

Have a good evening!

Joanna


Dolores Monet profile image

Dolores Monet 4 years ago from East Coast, United States

Love the pictures! Well your youngest may have had fun pretending to hold up bridges in photographs but I have several pix of my own self (in my 40's) pretending to be hanging from cliffs or tall trees. Now that was some trick photography. But most of the pictures were really stupid. Oh well....


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

Thanks, Dolores! I think those of us who grew up with Kodak Brownies took a lot of "trick photos" before the novelty wore off! My favorite was always the 6-inch fish hung close to the camera with the person who caught it standing several feet back so it would appear they were holding a record-breaking whopper. Half the fun was arranging such shots..."fun" the younger generation knows nothing about because the same results can now be achieved with a couple of mouse clicks and image-editing software... ;D


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 4 years ago from Orlando, FL

Just this morning I posted a comment on another hub about the Bridges Of Madison County and now I see your hub. Very interesting about the bridges needing to be weathered for the movie! Which by the way the book was so much better than the movie. I didn't know where John Wayne grew up, but I do now. UP! Awesome!


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

Thank you, Sunshine! I agree - although the movie "Bridges" followed the book more faithfully than some book-to-movies do, in this case the book was WAYYYYYY better than the movie! (Maybe because I had a much different idea of what Francesca should look like, and it wasn't Meryl Streep!) ;D


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 4 years ago from Orlando, FL

And Robert was not Clint Eastwood in any way, shape or form!!:)


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

LOL! My choice would've been Robert Redford, but I thought Clint did a DECENT job as Robert considering who he was paired with. Clint and Meryl had NO on-screen chemistry, let alone the sizzling attraction the book chronicled. I literally cried buckets while I was reading the book, but could barely squeeze out one tear watching the movie. Perhaps if Meryl had concentrated more on the attraction she was supposed to have for Robert and less on her ridiculous "Italian-in-Iowa" accent, I might've been more weepy. ;D


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 4 years ago from Orlando, FL

I would have opted for Jack Nicholson (think Postman Always Rings Twice with Jessica Lange) WOW! I also cried a LOT with the book and I was so excited for the movie. Epic fail.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

Jack Nicholson has never struck me as the Nat'l Geographic photographer, travel-the-world type, but okay, if you say so.

As for the movie being an "epic fail", it wasn't a total fail for me simply because I'd been to Winterset and Roseman Bridge and mainly went to see how many places I'd recognize. But my fellow theater-goers probably weren't thrilled when Robert/Clint walked into the Northside and my friend and I yelled in unison "There's our booth!". lol!


Sunshine625 profile image

Sunshine625 4 years ago from Orlando, FL

Hahaha that must have been cool for you to see familiar sites in the movie:)


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

It was! But I wish they hadn't "spiffed up" the Northside for the movie. It had a LOT more charm and personality the way it was before. ):


Lady Guinevere profile image

Lady Guinevere 4 years ago from West Virginia

Wow take a trip without leaving my desk here in WV. My husband is a big fan of John Wayne. This was really cool to read. Almost made me feel like I was there myself.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

LG, isn't cyber travel FUN? I do it all the time! An in-person visit to Winterset and John Wayne's boyhood home, though, will definitely give fans of the Duke a different perspective. I wasn't what you'd call a "big" fan at the time, but after being inside the tiny home he grew up in, I sure liked him a whole lot more! ;D


Lady Guinevere profile image

Lady Guinevere 4 years ago from West Virginia

Our area was spiffed up too for the filming of I think the title ws Gentlemen and Generals for something like that. It was another Civil War movie. I might have mentioned it in my hub about my area. I have changed the name of that hub so many times I don't remember the exact name.


Lady Guinevere profile image

Lady Guinevere 4 years ago from West Virginia


2patricias profile image

2patricias 4 years ago from Sussex by the Sea

I love the photos! I only wish more hubbers used their own photos. Yours are far more interesting than "professional" type photos. I mean, I don't think I've ever seen a photo in a travel mag of the back of a famous person's birthplace.

By the way - we live in an area frequently used for filming and we've seen a lot of spiffing up/ spiffing down/ artificial rain, etc - but never got a chance to take pictures (or inspired). Well done you.

Voted up.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

2pats, it never consciously occurred to me that most people don't snap pix of the back side of a famous person's birthplace! It was there and so was I with a camera, so I took it. But then I do tend to take "uncommon" shots...like the man on the ladder inside the bridge. Just the way I'm wired, I guess. lol!

In London, though, it was difficult to take anything BUT "postcard" pix of famous landmarks. Sometimes I didn't even bother and just bought the postcards instead!

I'll bet you HAVE seen a lot of spiffing up/down, etc! Most movie contracts will specify whatever was spiffed up/down has to be put back to its original state. I only wish that had been the case with the Northside Cafe.

Have you considered doing a hub about what movie makers do to make a place old or new, or make rain fall on a clear day? Even without photos - only your personal observations - I'm sure it'd be a GREAT hub!

Thanks for the UP vote! ;D


JanMaklak profile image

JanMaklak 4 years ago from Canada

Thank you for a great article. I tweeted it and posted it on Facebook.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 4 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

Thank YOU, JanMaklak, for the tweet and posting it to FB! Glad you enjoyed it! ;D


ologsinquito profile image

ologsinquito 2 years ago from USA

It looks like a charming place to visit. Great photos.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 2 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

ologsinquito, thanks so much for stopping by and leaving a comment! Yes, Winterset is a "charming" place to visit, albeit not quite as charming as my friend and I found it before the "Bridges" movie transformed it into a tourist mecca of souvenir shops and such. ;D


B Lucy profile image

B Lucy 2 years ago from Podunk, Virginia

Not only do I love the information included in this hub (I had no idea bridge moving was a thing) but I especially enjoyed the pictures. The workmanship of those old bridges is incredible and the houses are so charming!!


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 2 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

@B Lucy, glad you found this hub interesting and the pics enjoyable! I had no idea, either, that bridge moving was a "thing"! Perhaps it's confined to covered bridges because of the workmanship, and the wood used withstood the ravages of time so well. Rural Iowans are a frugal lot. 'Waste not, want not'. ;D


old albion profile image

old albion 2 years ago from Lancashire. England.

Hi Joanna. A really top class hub as is all your work. A great film we think, we have watched it several times, it is so bittersweet. We are always hoping for a different ending but not to be of course. Well done. lovely presentation and photographs.

Graham.


JamaGenee profile image

JamaGenee 2 years ago from Central Oklahoma Author

@old albion: Thank you for the kudos, Graham! I think anyone who sees the film even once hopes for a happier ending. Such a sad, sad story. At least I didn't cry buckets watching the film like I did reading the book before I found out it wasn't a true story. A pity the author's other books didn't grab a reader's heart like "Bridges" did. Or maybe it's good that they didn't. ;D

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