Maluti, an Endangered World Heritage

Palanquin in terracotta; Maluti
Palanquin in terracotta; Maluti
Goddessaraswati, the Goddess of Learning in terracotta; Makuti
Goddessaraswati, the Goddess of Learning in terracotta; Makuti
Matsyavatar (Lord Vishnu as a Fish); Terracotta, Maluti
Matsyavatar (Lord Vishnu as a Fish); Terracotta, Maluti
The temple of Goddess Mauliksha
The temple of Goddess Mauliksha
Nat Mandir; Temple of Goddess Mauliksha,. Maluti
Nat Mandir; Temple of Goddess Mauliksha,. Maluti
Temple of Goddess Mauliksha,. Maluti
Temple of Goddess Mauliksha,. Maluti
Broken stone idols at the base of a Neem (Margosa) tree; Maluti
Broken stone idols at the base of a Neem (Margosa) tree; Maluti
Shiva temple inside the temple complex housing the temple of Goddess Mauliksha
Shiva temple inside the temple complex housing the temple of Goddess Mauliksha
A solitary Charchala temple; Maluti
A solitary Charchala temple; Maluti
Two Charchala temples; Maluti
Two Charchala temples; Maluti
Another solitary temple; Maluti
Another solitary temple; Maluti
Temples; Maluti
Temples; Maluti
Temples; Maluti
Temples; Maluti
Terracotta decoration; Maluti
Terracotta decoration; Maluti
Hunter in terracotta; Maluti
Hunter in terracotta; Maluti
A man with a musket; terracotta; Maluti
A man with a musket; terracotta; Maluti
Three men with musket; terracotta; Maluti
Three men with musket; terracotta; Maluti
Elephant; terracotta, Maluti
Elephant; terracotta, Maluti
Terracotta work; front facade of a temple showing the battle between Lord Rama & Ravana; Maluti
Terracotta work; front facade of a temple showing the battle between Lord Rama & Ravana; Maluti
Ravana, King of Lanka; terracotta, Maluti
Ravana, King of Lanka; terracotta, Maluti
Goddess Durga in terracotta; Maluti (Please note the decay)
Goddess Durga in terracotta; Maluti (Please note the decay)
Lord Ganesha in terracotta; Maluti (Please note the decay)
Lord Ganesha in terracotta; Maluti (Please note the decay)
Kurmavatar (Lord Vishnu as a Tortoise) in terracotta; Maluti (Please note the decay)
Kurmavatar (Lord Vishnu as a Tortoise) in terracotta; Maluti (Please note the decay)
Terracotta panel showing battle scene from The Ramayana; Maluti
Terracotta panel showing battle scene from The Ramayana; Maluti
The road to Maluti
The road to Maluti
Crop (paddy) in the field of Maluti
Crop (paddy) in the field of Maluti
Crop (mustard) in the field of Maluti
Crop (mustard) in the field of Maluti
Crop (paddy) in the field of Maluti
Crop (paddy) in the field of Maluti
Crop (mustard) in the field of Maluti
Crop (mustard) in the field of Maluti
Terracotta pillar; Maluti
Terracotta pillar; Maluti
Vegetative decoration in terracotta; Maluti
Vegetative decoration in terracotta; Maluti
A scene from the Ramayana (Lord Rama killing the demon Maricha who came in the form of a golden deer) in terracotta, Maluti
A scene from the Ramayana (Lord Rama killing the demon Maricha who came in the form of a golden deer) in terracotta, Maluti
Lord Krishna killing Bakasura the Bird demon; in terracotta; Maluti
Lord Krishna killing Bakasura the Bird demon; in terracotta; Maluti
Flower design in terracotta; Maluti
Flower design in terracotta; Maluti
Scene from Krishna Leela (Vastraharan); Terracotta, Maluti
Scene from Krishna Leela (Vastraharan); Terracotta, Maluti
Battle of the Ramayana; terracotta panel; Maluti
Battle of the Ramayana; terracotta panel; Maluti
A horse drawn chariot; terracotta, Maluti
A horse drawn chariot; terracotta, Maluti
A cluster of temples; Maluti
A cluster of temples; Maluti
Another cluster of temples; Maluti
Another cluster of temples; Maluti
A solitary temple; Maluti
A solitary temple; Maluti

Maluti , the neglected temple-village

Maluti is a fantastic place to see, & is a perfect example of how we neglect our heritage. A village only 18 km from Rampurhat, an important town & railway station in the Birbhum district of West Bengal, & extremely rich in history & architecture apart from being an important centre for Shakta worship, it is surprisingly sparsely visited by tourists.

Maluti has a long history. Even some pre-historic stone tools found in the river bed of Chila which flows by the village confirm that Maluti used to be inhabited by our pre-historic fore-fathers, though the area was never excavated.

Maluti came into limelight in the 15th century as the capital of the kingdom of King Baj Basanta, which was a tax-free (NANKAR) kingdom. It is said that Baj Basanta , originally a poor village boy, got his kingdom as a gift from Sultan Alauddin Hussain Shah of Gaur (1495–1525) as a token of gratitude when Basanta managed to catch the pet hawk (BAJ in Bengali) & gave it to the sultan.

King Baj Basanta & his descendants were all very pious, & they constructed temples after temples in the village, thus making Maluti a temple village.

Maluti is well known for the temple of Goddess Maulikha (or Mauliksha). The word Mauliskha comes from two words — mauli (head) and iksha (to view).

Around 1857, Swami Bamdev (or Bamakhyapa), one of Bengal’s greatest spiritual leaders stayed here at the temple of Goddess Maulikha before he migrated to Tarapith a few miles away. It is said that Swami Bamdev considered Goddess Maulikha as the elder sister of the Goddess Tara of Tarapith & used to call Goddess Maulikha as “Baro Maa” (Elder Mother). But now Tarapith has flourished as a pilgrim centre, while Maluti is almost totally neglected.

Maluti was a part of Birbhum district of Bengal till 1855, but after 1855 it became a part of Santhal Pargana, Bihar. It is now in the district of Dumka, Jharkhand. In 1981, Jharkhand government has given the village the status of historically important “Temple Village”. Later ASI has taken up the care of the temples. In 2010, Maluti is included in the “ Endangered Heritage of the World” - list by the Global Heritage Fund of USA.

The importance of Maluti today is for being a “temple village”. The temples can be grouped into two distinctly separate groups :

A) The temple complex of Goddess Maulikha which is just outside the village; &

B) The temples inside the village proper.

The temple complex of Goddess Maulikha:

This complex is situated just outside the village & is surrounded by a wall. Inside, there are 4 temples : 1) The main temple of the Goddess, which is a Dochala or Ek Bangla type with triple entrance. The temple now is coated with white colour. Inside, there is the idol of the Goddess (The deity does not have a body, only a red-coloured head sculpted out of laterite stone fixed on the temple wall). There is a Nat Mandir in front of the temple. 2) A tall Charchala type temple dedicated to Lord Shiva. There are some terracotta decorations on the front façade of this temple. 3) Two other smaller temples, one of which is dedicated to Swami Bamdev, & is said to house his trident.

There is a big Neem (Margosa) tree at one corner with some broken stone idols at its base.

The temples inside the village :

The whole village is dotted with temples. But a grand view jumps to the visitor at a particular area where 72 temples are located in around a radius of 350 metres! It is simply stupefying. Temples, almost all Charchala type with single entrance of Bengal style, are standing there in several clusters. Some of the temples have Pirha-type design at the top. There are examples of places with more than this number of temples at one place (eg. Kalna or Nababhat of Barddhaman district where one can see 109 temples at one place), but the grandeur is definitely more here. Temples of different sizes & of different colours, with or without terracotta decorations, solitary or in clusters, stand there in grand silence. The scene is really awe inspiring.

Some of the temples show signs of decay & neglect, but many are in good shape. ASI is definitely doing some good job here.

The temples mostly contain Shiva Lingams. Some seem abandoned. Some are plain without decorations, some are with terracotta decorations on the front façade. The terracotta plaques display scenes from Hindu epics & mythology, mainly scenes from the Ramayana. Standard Dashavatars (Ten Incarnations of Lord Vishnu) & scenes from Krishna’s life (Krishna Leela) are also seen.

Maluti can be reached from Rampurhat town by hired car/trekker. Rampurhat is well connected with Kolkata by road & rail.

Maluti, with its beautiful temples, awaits for visitors. It really deserves much more attention than it is getting now.

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