My Italy Travel Blogs - Pictures of Venice

Like a city out of a fairy tale, Venice seems like a figment of a child's whimsical daydream. Streets of water? Boats instead of cars? Colorful plastered walls—now faded—and chipped statues of Grecian women carrying pitchers line the water of the Grand Canal. Every narrow alleyway glitters with liquid moonlight, intricate stone bridges spanning the gap between buildings.

Venice is the city that raised Marco Polo. Caressed by the sea, Venice must have given Marco the feeling that the sea equaled opportunity, not danger. Boats and canals were his cradle; ships and seas would be his life.

Pictures of Venice

One of the many water "streets" in Venice.
One of the many water "streets" in Venice. | Source
A gondola docked between traditional posts.
A gondola docked between traditional posts. | Source

Venice, Italy blog

Our band of five travelers, including my brother and I, were exploring Venice for the first time. We drove across the bridge (Via Liberta) from mainland Italy to Venice, and parked our car in the Piazzale Roma, in the San Marco garage. Because we were just outside the busiest tourist season (we visited in May), this garage was not the crowded nightmare that many have experienced, but was highly convenient for us. After a drive up the seemingly-endless spiraling ramp to the top floor of the garage, we saw our first view of Venice: tiled roofs in salmon-orange competing for space, almost piled on one another, with not a bit of the low-lying water visible between the buildings.

Picture of Venice: my first view

Source

Once we were down on the cobblestone walkway outside the parking garage, a flurry of decisions had to be made. The hotel we had booked for the night was Hotel Mercurio, near the Piazza San Marco, which was on the other side of Venice. The cheapest transport option were the vaporettos, (bus-like boats) that weren't terribly fast or romantic, but would get us there and give us a good view of Venice from the water of the main "highway," the Grand Canal. Winding like a backwards S-shaped snake through the heart of Venice, the canal was full of speed boats, black gondolas, bus boats, and bridges. To get a better view, we stood outside, on the deck of our vaporetto.

Pictures of Venice from the Boat

First view of the water from our bus boat.
First view of the water from our bus boat. | Source
A beautiful building on the canal
A beautiful building on the canal | Source
A view of the smaller waterways between buildings from the canal.
A view of the smaller waterways between buildings from the canal. | Source
Bridge over the canal
Bridge over the canal | Source
View of buildings from canal.
View of buildings from canal. | Source
The canal.
The canal. | Source
Gondoliers on the canal.
Gondoliers on the canal. | Source

Venice, Italy: Gondola Rides vs. Bus Boat Rides

I had done some research on gondola rides and rates before I arrived, and knew the 80 Eu. rate for a 40 minute gondola ride was too much for my slim Europe-in-two-weeks budget. I also had read that the more picturesque waterways, in quiet little streets winding between frescoed walls, were not a part of the gondolier's route unless requested—or bribed. So, we drank up all the sights and sounds to be had on the deck of our vaporetto for only 7 Eu, and when we hopped out to drop off our luggage at our hotel, we planned to see the rest of Venice on foot. If we could have rented a gondola for an evening and paddled it ourselves, we certainly would have, but only Venice residents are allowed to apply for a license.

Venice on foot was not disappointing! We started with a walk along the Grand Canal to find an Italian restaurant with outside dining. My carbonara pasta was delicious, and as the lowering sun tinted our world golden, a paunchy Venetian with an accordion and a rich voice directed his sonnets to us.

Pictures of Venice: Dining on the Grand Canal

Carbonara in Venice
Carbonara in Venice | Source
Source

After dinner, we walked across the Piazza San Marco (St. Mark's Square, in English). This long stretch of tile was bordered by live bands seeking to draw in passers-by. Charismatic and vivacious, the musicians and band leaders called out to the audience with jokes and folk stories, then ramped up a foot-tapping melody. From the center of the plaza, the contradicting music from so many different performances created a cacophonous competition for our attention, but what really amazed us was the flat, stretched-out plaza itself. Venice was built on a series of 118 islands, many of which were formed by pulling dirt out of the lagoon. The spots where the dirt was lifted became canals. This long stretch of stone tile was built on silt and pond scum!

Photos of Venice: St. Mark's Square

The Piazza San Marco
The Piazza San Marco | Source
Source
West facade of St. Mark's Basilica
West facade of St. Mark's Basilica | Source
In 2007 and 2008, St. Mark's Square flooded. Much of Venice floods in the winter and springtime during the "high water" time, so it isn't unusual for locals to go about their business in high top rain boots.
In 2007 and 2008, St. Mark's Square flooded. Much of Venice floods in the winter and springtime during the "high water" time, so it isn't unusual for locals to go about their business in high top rain boots. | Source

Travel Blog: Exploring Venice on Foot

Though St. Mark's Square is the historic center of economic and church activity and the current center of tourism, the smaller alleyways and canals with their delicate Gothic bridges were what we really wanted to see. I was enchanted by the colors of the buildings. Each was unique. Bold pinks and oranges traded off with frescoed yellows and creams. Then a bright turquoise door or window flowerpot would stand out. Even the architecture of each building was different. Sometimes a flat-fronted building would have four or five balconies looking out over the water, other times just a railing across a window. Statues and trim in an Eastern Orthodox style would suddenly light up another building, and an occasional dome-topped church and steeple would contrast with the flat tile roofs.

Source
Source
Source
Source
Source
Source
Source
Source
Bridge in Venice
Bridge in Venice | Source

Often when I visit a new place, I wonder, "Could I live here?" I'd like to think that by the grace of God, any location could be a place to build a happy home. Though beautiful and intriguing, and though surrounded by boats and boating (which I love), Venice would be a difficult place to live. An average of 50,000 tourists each day added on to the city's 271,000 residents make for a very crowded city. I know we visited the most touristy spot in Venice, and that any other place besides St. Mark's Square has a more local, and thus more stable, culture.

However, the cost of living in Venice is fairly high, and Venice is losing its population due to taxes and the cost of rent. The average foreigner who moves to Venice spends only a few years there before moving away again.

Another thing that I noticed was the dank and musty smell when in the city itself. The footpaths are so narrow and the buildings so close, that I can't imagine a wind ever touches it. Venice is surrounded by water, crisscrossed by water, and subject to almost yearly flooding. It's no wonder that mold and mildew are a way of life for Venice. In our hotel, where we stayed for one night in May, my window was so hemmed in by neighboring buildings that it was impossible to open it all the way, and even if it could open all the way, I don't think I could get so much as a thin little breeze into our stuffy room. For someone who grew up in dry and open Colorado, Venice felt almost claustrophobic. It's no wonder that the Venetians put so much care into their potted plants and patio gardens, because that's the only bit of freshness this stone-and-water city can produce.

View from my hotel window.
View from my hotel window. | Source

A night and half-a-day later, and we were on our feet again, winding our way through narrow streets to find our way out of Venice. In the morning light, Venice was a cheerful and productive place. We saw less of the touristy nightlife and more of the normal locals going about their day. Boats loaded with basil and tomatoes glided up to the sidewalk with fresh bounty for sale from the farmland outside Venice. Street merchants arranged their Gucci bags on their mats to tempt our eyes. An old man opened a window above me and generously doused his flowers, the water overflowing and trickling down the wall, across the sidewalk, and trickling into the canal lapping at my feet.

Produce water-market
Produce water-market | Source
Source

More by this Author

  • EDITOR'S CHOICE
    Facts About the Tower of London (with Photos)
    61

    Planning a visit to the Tower of London, or just curious about its history? I've compiled a list of odd and curious facts about the tower of London, along with some fantastic photos of the inside.

  • EDITOR'S CHOICE
    Why We Love William Wallace: "Freedom!"
    33

    William Wallace's battle cry, "Freedom!" resonates a deep chord in Americans' hearts. Perhaps it is the powerful war-voice of the bagpipes, the poetic thunder of a thousand hooves of Highland-bred horses, the...

  • EDITOR'S CHOICE
    Scottish Castles for Sale in Scotland
    78

    Scotland's castles are a wealth of history, drama, and culture. Now, many castles in Scotland are for sale. Here are a few of the finest castles for sale in Scotland, available at a range of prices.


Comments 8 comments

Eiddwen profile image

Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

Oh what a wonderful hub and I now look forward to so many more by you.

Eddy.


Jane Grey profile image

Jane Grey 4 years ago from Oregon Author

Thank you, Eddy! It was fun to relive the Venetian memories.


bridalletter profile image

bridalletter 3 years ago from Blue Springs, Missouri, USA

Fab hub of my dream vacation. I hope you will sell your pictures on redbubble so I can buy them!


daisydayz profile image

daisydayz 3 years ago from Cardiff

Wow it looks amazing! Venice is on my 'to visit' list so I hope I will make it there one day!


donnah75 profile image

donnah75 3 years ago from Upstate New York

Beautiful pictures. I love Venice! I have been there a few times. I remember talking with a Venetian man who did say that it isn't as romantic and glamorous to live there as it is to visit, as you stated in your article. It is one of my favorite places on the list of places I have been though. Voted up.


Jane Grey profile image

Jane Grey 3 years ago from Oregon Author

Hi BridalLetter! Thanks for your comment. I haven't thought about selling my photos on redbubble before. Is it fairly easy to use? I'd be happy to sell you some and just email you a paypal invoice for them if you're serious. :)

-Jane


Jane Grey profile image

Jane Grey 3 years ago from Oregon Author

DaisyDayz, I hope you will find your way over there sometime too! It's truly a magical place.


Jane Grey profile image

Jane Grey 3 years ago from Oregon Author

Donnah75, thank you! Yes, I loved it too. I didn't have the pleasure of talking to any local Venitians, but I've read some of their comments and articles about living in Venice. It sounds like an adventure, with the constant flooding during the rainy season. But very romantic! I could imagine living there for a year and selling paintings on the streets, or something like that... :)

-Jane

    Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No HTML is allowed in comments, but URLs will be hyperlinked. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites.


    Jane Grey profile image

    Ann Leavitt (Jane Grey)615 Followers
    75 Articles



    Click to Rate This Article
    working